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Well, NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell is here. She's been listening to that interview, and she's going to talk with us more about this controversy over Brett Kavanaugh. Hey, Kelsey.

KELSEY SNELL, BYLINE: Hi there.

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Copyright 2018 Texas Public Radio. To see more, visit Texas Public Radio.

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Late in the fourth quarter of last weekend's Denver Broncos football game, the Broncos were well-positioned for a win. The team trailed the Oakland Raiders 19-17, but Denver was in comfortable range to score a field goal.

But strangely, for an 18-second period, Denver was a long shot, 750-1 underdog to win the game on the bookmaker FanDuel.

Updated September 19, 6:02 p.m.

The results of a seven-month-long investigation into sexual harassment and workplace misconduct within the Dallas Mavericks organization over a period spanning more than 20 years were released Wednesday.

Investigators gathered information from 215 interviews with current and former employees who worked for the team during the past two decades and evaluated more than 1.6 million documents for the more than 40-page report.

India's government decreed punishments of arrest and jail time on Wednesday for Muslim men who terminate their marriages by simply uttering three words.

The practice of instant divorce, called "triple talaq," happens in person, over the phone, by text and in email. Men can end their marriages by repeating the word "talaq," Arabic for "divorce," three times – and his wife has no say in the matter.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

When an economy needs refugees

12 hours ago

The White House said this week it will cut the number of refugees allowed into the country to 30,000 next year from the 45,000-person limit for 2018. That's a record low for the United States, which worries many local economies that depend on immigrant and refugee labor. Erie, Pennsylvania, is one of those places. The city strategically welcomed and resettled refugees when the population was shrinking and jobs were disappearing.

There was some big news this week in the auto and tech industries, which are increasingly overlapping. The world's largest automotive partnership, the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, which sold more than 10 million cars around the world last year, is going to start embedding Google's Android operating system in its cars starting in 2021.  The promise for consumers?  Infotainment systems that do more and are less, shall we say, buggy. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The bill that gives a nod to federal aviation spending over the next five years passed the U.S. House but has yet to take flight in the Senate. The Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill includes changes to airline ticket fees, and safety upgrades. But critics say the bill falls short in one area: improving the nation's air traffic control system, which they say is under strain as the industry expands to accommodate more and more passengers. Commercial air carriers have been pushing to move the nation's air traffic control system from radar to GPS.

When it comes to tariffs, consider today T minus five. In five days, more than 5,000 types of goods from China will be added to a list of tariffs imposed by the United States. That likely means higher prices for leather handbags. Fruit juice. Rain jackets. We may be surprised by what's on the list. But here's the thing: Lots of American factories will be surprised, too. Because in a world of supercomplex global supply chains, manufacturers don't always know what's in their own products.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

One year ago, on the afternoon of Sept. 19, Wesley Bocxe was at home with his wife, Elizabeth Esguerra, in their eighth-floor apartment in the trendy Mexico City neighborhood of Condesa. Elizabeth was in the kitchen preparing lunch. Wesley was in bed with a fever. Their young daughter, Amara, was at school.

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