Eyder Peralta

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.

He is responsible for covering the region's people, politics, and culture. In a region that vast, that means Peralta has hung out with nomadic herders in northern Kenya, witnessed a historic transfer of power in Angola, ended up in a South Sudanese prison, and covered the twists and turns of Kenya's 2017 presidential elections.

Previously, he covered breaking news for NPR, where he covered everything from natural disasters to the national debates on policing and immigration.

Peralta joined NPR in 2008 as an associate producer. Previously, he worked as a features reporter for the Houston Chronicle and a pop music critic for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville, FL.

Through his journalism career, he has reported from more than a dozen countries and he was part of the NPR teams awarded the George Foster Peabody in 2009 and 2014. His 2016 investigative feature on the death of Philando Castile was honored by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for News Design.

Peralta was born amid a civil war in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. His parents fled when he was a kid, and the family settled in Miami. He's a graduate of Florida International University.

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After a disputed presidential election, Zimbabwe has cracked down on the opposition. One of its leaders sought asylum in neighboring Zambia, but he was returned, then detained. Now he's out on bail. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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This week in Zimbabwe, there was a vote, then accusations of vote rigging followed by street protests and a military crackdown. At least six people died. Now finally we have results in Zimbabwe's first election since Dictator Robert Mugabe was forced out in November.

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Two days after a historic election and before the results are in, Zimbabwe's military has taken over the streets of the capital city, Harare. They're trying to quell protesters.

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Let's take you now to Zimbabwe, where tomorrow the country will hold its first elections since Robert Mugabe was deposed from power. This is the story of the rise and the fall of a pop song that marked Mugabe's demise. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

Robert Mugabe sat on a green office chair. He wore sunglasses, and he looked small placed at the center of a gazebo in the middle of his huge estate in one of Harare's wealthiest suburbs.

Behind him, there was a pond, and down a sloping hill, his mansion — a sprawling multistory house flanked by granite lions and topped with blue, Chinese-inspired tiles that give it its name — "the Blue Roof."

For 37 years, Mugabe ruled Zimbabwe with an iron fist. But the mansion is where he spends most of his time now, since the military pressured him to resign in November.

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At home in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, Frehiwot Negash was watching history unfold on television.

She watched Sunday as Abiy Ahmed, the young reformist prime minister of Ethiopia, stepped off a plane and hugged the longtime ruler of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki, waiting on the tarmac in Eritrea's capital.

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Sixty thousand people a year die of rabies, mostly in Asia and Africa. NPR's Eyder Peralta traveled to Tanzania to learn about a large-scale scientific experiment trying to keep humans and wildlife safe from the disease.

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One of the first things that you notice upon landing in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, is how clean it is. The city has become a shining example of positive urban transformation. But there is also a dark side, as NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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Now to Uganda's capital of Kampala. Like many African cities, gridlock prevails on the streets. Mass transit is inadequate. So boda bodas, or motorcycle taxis, are indispensable. They're also dangerous. NPR's Eyder Peralta looks at a company trying to change that.

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Ethiopia is a country that venerates tradition. Some customs date back to biblical times - one lasting love there, beer. Here's a postcard from NPR's Eyder Peralta.

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Here in the United States, cars and industry are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases. In Africa, it's different. There, it's agriculture and a lot of it is cows. NPR's Eyder Peralta visited a lab trying to understand cow emissions.

Preparing for a controversial referendum, the central African country of Burundi is on edge.

The Thursday referendum would not only extend the rule of President Pierre Nkurunziza until 2034, but it would also roll back some key aspects of the Arusha Agreement, which paved the way for ending the country's long and bloody civil war in 2005. The fear is that the referendum could spark more violence in the country.

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STEVE INSKEEP, BYLINE: There are more volcanic eruptions in Hawaii, and then there is Kenya, where the earth seemed to crack open recently. NPR's Eyder Peralta investigated.

Updated at 9:40 a.m. ET

As residents of the small town of Solai in central Kenya describe it, the loud boom happened about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Nakuru Gov. Lee Kinyanjui told KTN News that the water rushed out of the dam at an incredible speed, taking with it homes and people.

"When this tragedy occurred, the lights went off, the [electricity] poles were washed away and the whole town was rendered dark," Kinyanjui said.

Editor's note: This post contains some strong language.

Stella Nyanzi walks into court with a broad smile. She is familiar with this place, so she is the first in the door and casually takes a seat on a wooden bench right in front of the judge.

Our series "Take A Number" looks at problems around the world — and the people trying to solve them — through the lens of a single number.

From the boat, Rebecca Kochulem points at the hills surrounding Lake Baringo. It is a spectacular specimen of natural beauty: red cliffs plunging into water, steam rising from gurgling hot springs and the hills, lush and green with acacia trees.

Kochulem, a zoologist, sees this as a perfect habitat for giraffes.

Little Girma had charmed the entire hotel lobby in Addis Ababa. Brad and Niki Huelsman looked at the 3-year-old boy with awe and warmth as he played with one of the waitresses.

"He wins people over with the beautiful eyes and the little cheeks that I just want to kiss," Niki says.

The couple had flown from Morrow, Ohio, to Ethiopia to finish adopting Girma in January. As they describe it, the process was complicated and at times, heart-wrenching — five years of fits and starts.

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Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhinoceros, died in Kenya on Monday, leaving his species one step closer to extinction, even as a group of scientists undertake an unprecedented effort to try to keep this animal from vanishing entirely.

The stands shake as fans break into song. Hundreds jump up and down, setting a much faster tempo than the play on the field.

This soccer stadium is in the heart of political opposition territory in Ethiopia. On a recent Sunday, thousands of supporters are sitting shoulder to shoulder. And surrounding the pitch, dozens of paramilitary police look out at the crowd, some with their guns in hand, others at the ready with tear gas canisters.

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