Making It Grow

Mon-Sat, throughout the day

Amanda McNulty of Clemson University’s Extension Service and host of ETV’s six-time Emmy Award-winning show, Making It Grow, offers gardening tips and techniques.

Archive: Making It Grow Podcasts, January 2011 - September 2014

Ways to Connect

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clemson’s Home and Garden Information Center has a dandy fact sheet called Planning, p-l-a-n-n-i-n-g, a garden. You still have time to put out hardier winter vegetables like kale, collards, and turnips. Extension Agent Tony Melton and I have recorded podcasts about how to get a successful garden up and going and you can find those along with all sorts of other cool things to listen to.

Battling Webworms

Sep 7, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Back in the day, we took a long bamboo pole with us to the Christmas tree farm be sure a tree would reach our tall ceilings. If I were worried about the fall webworms in my pecan trees, perhaps I could use that pole to break up some of the lower nests.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Many people try to spray insecticides on the nests of eastern tent caterpillars or fall webworms. The webs, however, protect the caterpillars and usually the nests are too high to effectively reach with your sprayer. Trying to burn the nests may start a fire or badly damage the tree. One specialists says that if you can safely reach the nest, use the five-fingered, digital, integrated pest management approach.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The fall webworms are spectacularly visible these days. In spring, adults emerge from overwinter cocoons, females lay eggs and the first generation of this native caterpillar begins feeding in early summer.   They don’t cause much damage as by the time their populations build up towards the end of summer, the deciduous leaves they’re feeding on are ending their life cycle.

Making It Grow Extra: More on Pines

Sep 4, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty and Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium continue their discussion on pine trees with more facts about the Slash Pine, the White Pine and the Shortleaf Pine.
(MIG Extra 11)

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. South Carolina has two noticeable web-building caterpillars, the Eastern tent caterpillar and the fall web worm.

Dr. John Nelson, Amanda McNulty
Sean Flynn/SCETV

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about the Longleaf Pine, the Slash Pine and the Loblolly Pine.
(MIG Extra 10)

Making It Grow Extra: A Trip to Nebraska

Sep 2, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about his recent trip to botanize in Nebraska.
(MIG Extra 09)

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Feel free to bring flowering stems of goldenrod indoors – with insect-disseminated pollen it doesn’t cause allergies. It’s ragweed that makes copious amounts of nose-tickling pollen so light weight that winds blow it far and wide. Our most common ragweed is Ambrosia artesimifolia (no one seems to know why it’s called Ambrosia – the food of the Gods), and usually it tops out at a couple of feet.

Making It Grow Extra: Sunflowers

Sep 1, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore go in depth in the family of sunflowers.
(MIG Extra 08)

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about the importance of botany and taxonomy in today’s world.
(MIG Extra 07)

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  You might enjoy hearing some fun facts about goldenrod since it’s blooming everywhere now. Carolina’s AC Moore Herbarium lists over thirty different species of goldenrod, in the genus Solidago, collected here; some grow all over while others occur in only a few counties.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I found a kindred spirit while reading up on golden rod. Althea Fann wrote a charming article, “Reflections of an Accidental Florist,” you can find online. Printed in Crazyhorse, a College of Charleston publication, it’s available at the site Longreads.com.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clumps of goldenrod are brightening our roadsides and gardens. Garden club ladies don’t want watery eyes or runny noses, so you can bet they did their homework before encouraging our General Assembly to name goldenrod as the state wildflower. Plants with showy colorful flowers are usually trying to attract insect pollinators to carry their relatively heavy pollen from one flower to the next, and that’s exactly what happens with goldenrod.

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Clemson Agronomy Agent and SC Statewide Coordinator for the Industrial Hemp Program David DeWitt. They explain the challenges of growing, processing and marketing this new crop for South Carolina.

Healing Goldenrod

Aug 27, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Although it doesn’t feel like fall, with temperatures in the 80’s and 90’s, many plants we associate with autumn, especially in the aster family, are coming into flower. The roads I travel   from St.

Host of “Making It Grow” and Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Tony Melton about applying preemergent to your lawn in the Fall to prevent Spring weeds.

Host of “Making It Grow” and Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Tony Melton about the best practices for maintaining your Fall turf grass.

Making It Grow Extra: Contoling Nematodes

Aug 24, 2018

Host of “Making It Grow” and Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and fellow agent Tony Melton discuss nematodes and the best ways to control them.

Host of “Making It Grow” and Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and fellow agent Tony Melton discuss the best practices for insect control in your Fall vegetable garden.

Tony Melton and Amanda McNulty
Sean Flynn/SCETV

Host of “Making It Grow” and Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and fellow agent Tony Melton discuss tips for planting your Fall vegetable garden.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Blueberries, figs,  and muscadines are plants good for  backyard orchard s–   you don’t have to do much as far as insect or disease control goes. Elderberry is another plant you might add to your backyard if you have some room. In other parts of the country, there are lots of both commercial and home orchards of elderberry but for some reason we haven’t used them much in the south. But Dr.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. In the New World, the first kaolin clay mined for shipment back to England to be used in fine china came from the colony of South Carolina, and today we are second only to Georgia for kaolin extraction. We spoke about how kaolin clay sprayed on vegetables and fruits helps prevent insect feeding, but it also can prevent sunburn. Just like zinc oxide protects my nose from the sun, a coating of this white clay film protects tomato fruits from sunscald and tissue necrosis.

Why No Fruit?

Aug 16, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Lots of calls are coming to   Extension offices about vegetable plants that have lush and plentiful foliage    but are not setting fruits, especially beans and tomatoes. There are several factors at play. One is high night time temperatures. Tony Melton explains that plants cool themselves by a process called transpiration – basically sweating.

Using Kaolin Clay

Aug 15, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Kaolin clay is a nuisance in garden soil; unlike red clay, it’s basically inert, low in electrical charges that hold nutrients and water, and is even more gluey and sticky if you can image that. However, it has a several uses for commercial growers and home gardeners. When kaolin clay is sprayed on plants, it forms a barrier, coating the leaves and fruits with a white film which protects them from damage by certain insects, including thrips and other leaf and fruit eating pests.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. My new sunscreen has zinc oxide in it; it actually forms a physical barrier to protect my skin from sunburn. Believe it or not, sunburn is a serious issue for many fruits and vegetables, too. Sunburn necrosis occurs when vegetable’s skin or peel which receives direct sunlight reaches a certain temperature and the tissue is killed. It’s the temperature of the fruit’s skin – not the air temperature – that’s critical.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I spoke with a young mother last week whose husband works for the US Forestry Department. He’s been sent out west to help fight the dangerous and extensive fires that are burning thousands of acres in that part of the country. In addition to the dangers that automatically come to mind, fire fighters are at risk for getting skin irritations from encountering poison ivy. More seriously, they may inhale smoke from burned plants which contains the urushiol compound which causes reactions in most people.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Many people have trouble telling poison ivy and Virginia creeper apart., Both are native vines in the cashew family, both are deciduous, have compound leaves and produce berries that are an important food for birds in the winter. Poison ivy, however, has three leaflets per leaf, leaves of three –- leave it be -- while Virginia creeper has five leaflets and is actually quite pretty and  planted frequently for beauty and erosion control.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Recently   I noticed a red spot on my wrist which I attributed to an insect bite. Sadly, that was a misdiagnosis – turns out that in my summer mission to get unwanted vines and such out of established beds, I mistook a poison ivy vine for Virginia creeper and ended up with a bad outbreak on my arms. Both these native vines have hairy stems when mature and climbing on trees.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. My two- and-a half acre yard is getting to be more than I can handle. When we moved here, thirty-three years ago, most of it was an old field, with just two large beds of camellias and an island of pines. We hired someone to bush hog it several times each summer and had just a small area to cut with a push mower. With youthful enthusiasm, I changed that by planting beds of assorted shrubs and trees, large and small.

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