Charleston

Updated at 11:10 a.m. EST

The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., today is holding its first Sunday service following a horrific shooting that killed nine members of a Bible study group there.

Updated at 6:46 p.m. EDT

Dylann Roof, the Charleston church shooting suspect, appears to have set up a website that contains photos of himself and a manifesto-like diatribe against non-whites. The author of the rant writes of being motivated by the Trayvon Martin case and concludes that there is "no choice" but to "take it to the real world."

(This post was last updated at 11:24 a.m. ET.)

Just hours after police apprehended 21-year-old Dylann Roof in Shelby, N.C., authorities flew him back to Charleston, S.C., a city that was still trying to comprehend the crime Roof is accused of committing.

NPR's Cheryl Corley reports that many residents stopped outside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Thursday. They laid flowers at the foot of the grand Gothic Revival church originally built in 1891.

She reports:

The nine people who were killed in a mass shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., on Wednesday have been identified by the authorities.

Denmark Vesey
Courtesy National Park Service

  There's a long history to the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., — affectionately known as "Mother Emanuel" — where nine churchgoers were allegedly shot and killed by 21-year-old Dylann Roof on Wednesday night. Part of that history involves Denmark Vesey, a West Indian slave, and later a freedman, who planned what would have been one of the largest slave rebellions in the United States had word of the plans not been leaked.

The revolt was to take place on Bastille Day, July 17, 1822, and was in reaction to the city of Charleston's suppression of the African Church, which boasted a membership of over three thousand in 1820. News of the plan leaked and Charleston authorities arrested the plot's leaders before the uprising could begin.

Dr. Bernard E. Powers, Jr., Professor of History and Director of African-American Studies at the College of Charleston, joins Dr. Edgar to talk about Denmark Vesey and why his name still has resonance today. (Originally broadcast 03/14/08)


In a short speech at the White House, President Obama on Thursday addressed the mass shooting at a Charleston church.

He said that while the investigation constrained what he could say about the facts of case, he was not constrained by emotion.

In the Holy City, it's called "Mother Emanuel." Charleston's Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has a long history in which its existence was threatened — or even banned outright. Every time, the church that was the scene of Wednesday's mass shooting has survived and rebuilt.

Among the nine victims of Wednesday's shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. was its pastor, Clementa Pinckney, who was also a was also a Democratic state senator. He was 41.

According to the church's website, Pinckney "answered the call to preach at the age of 13 and received his first appointment to pastor at the age of 18."

Undated photo of Dylann Roof from his Facebook page
Facebook

  Updated 11:45 am: Area news sources, including WOLO TV in Columbia and WCCB TV in Charlotte, are reporting that 21-year-old Dylann Roof, the suspect in a mass killing Wednesday night at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, has been arrested in Shelby, NC. Authorities identify Roof as the assailant who killed nine people during a bible study at the historic church. WOLO reports that the FBI has confirmed the arrest.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET.

Police in Charleston, S.C., say a man they suspect opened fire and killed nine people during a Wednesday prayer meeting at one of the city's oldest historically black churches has been captured.

A section of "The Space Between" by Alyson Shotz
Wellin Bentham/Halsey Gallery

  The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art presents an exhibition of recent work by Brooklyn-based sculptor, Alyson Shotz. With an artistic practice that examines the properties and interactions of light, gravity, mass, and space, Shotz bridges disciplines in her work, drawing on scientific methods, mathematical principles, and literature, among other diverse fields. Often employing nontraditional materials such as glass beads, linen thread, stainless-steel filaments, and welded aluminum to create large-scale abstract sculptures, Shotz expands upon conventional notions of sculptural space and form.


Charles Ross
Lisa Hebden

  What do "Star Wars" and "The Lord of the Rings" have in common? Charles Ross is presenting both movie sagas as one man shows, part of the Piccolo Fringe theater series.


Charleston Jazz Orchestra
Jazz Artists of Charleston

  Why is Jazz important to Charleston? Leah Suarez of Jazz Artists of Charleston answers that question, and gives us a rundown of this year's JAC Jazz Series, part of Piccolo Spoleto.

Now in its ninth year of presenting, Jazz Artists of Charleston has earned an unprecedented reputation of producing events of the highest caliber that celebrate Lowcountry jazz, with a focus on optimizing the listener’s experience. This year, JAC welcomes Piccolo Spoleto attendees with an intimate Charleston Jazz House edition of its highly acclaimed JAC Jazz Series. Up close and personal performances of an array of repertoire in the jazz canon--from traditional to modern, Latin to funk, and everything in between.


T. J. Dawe in "The Slipknot"
Diane Smithers

  In turns hysterical and heartbreaking, frantic and thoughtful, The Slipknot is a comic monologue in which TJ Dawe takes the audience through a history of dead end jobs he has held. The Slipknot is part of Piccolo Spoleto's PiccoloFringe theater series.


  Brennen Reeves just wanted to be normal. The only problem: the fatal lung disease, Cystic Fibrosis. The only solution: a double lung transplant. Reeves has turned his story into a one-person play called Breathe, and it is playing as part of Piccolo Spoleto's Stelle di Domani (stars of tomorrow) Series. Reeves and co-creator David Lee Nelson talk about bringing such a serious subject to the stage in a play that is often quite funny.


    The Charleston Men’s Chorus presents its annual Memorial Day concert as part of Piccolo Spoleto, Monday at noon in St. Phillips Church. This 70-member, all-male chorus, currently is in its 21st year, will present a somber and celebratory tribute to our veterans and current members of our Armed Forces at its popular Memorial Day concert. This annual event will feature service anthems, patriotic songs, and other inspiring works. Charleston Men’s Chorus is a non-profit organization devoted to entertaining the tri-county area with its striking harmonies. The group is under the direction of Richard Bordas, accompanied by Pamela Nelson on piano.


In the old-time American music tradition of "shapenote" singing, Sacred Harp is both the name of a songbook and a name for a singer's heart. Piccolo Spoleto brings traditional singers from around the South for an old-time all-day singing event from The Sacred Harp on Saturday afternoon from 10:00 am to 3:30 pm in the Gage Hall on Archdale St. in Charleston.

In the old-time American music tradition of "shapenote" singing, Sacred Harp is both the name of a songbook and a name for a singer's heart. Piccolo Spoleto brings traditional singers from around the South for an old-time all-day singing event from The Sacred Harp on Saturday afternoon from 10:00 am to 3:30 pm in the Gage Hall on Archdale St. in Charleston. One of the longest lived musical traditions in America, ‘shapenote’ singing features unaccompanied voices, strong rhythms, powerful poetry, and starkly beautiful harmonies.


"A" is for Allen, William Hervey, Jr.

“C” is for Charleston Ironwork. Elements of decorative iron first appeared on Charleston buildings during the middle decades of the eighteenth century. Crafted by local blacksmiths, they closely followed the designs of British architect and furniture designer, Robert Adam. After the revolution, the designs of local architects and blacksmiths dominated the production of Charleston wrought iron. Among the noted pieces from this era is the much-celebrated Sword Gate, designed by Charles Reichert and forged by Christopher Werner.

 

Many small businesses grapple with succession...who should take over the business if the owner should pass away, become disabled, or just ready to retire.  There's a new trend in dealing with this issue that involves the owner selling the business to someone, oftentimes a young person, who is being mentored by the founder, who agrees to stay on for a few years in an advisory capacity.  This is exactly what has happened recently with an architecture firm in Charleston.

  “H” is for Historic Charleston Foundation [HCF]. The Historic Charleston Foundation sprang from the activities of the Carolina Art Association. In 1944, the association published This is Charleston, a survey of historic buildings. In 1947, HCF was incorporated as a separate organization to preserve buildings still occupied by their owners, instead of museums. To raise money, HCF sponsored its first Festival of Homes and saved important structures such as the Nathaniel Russell House.

“C” is for Charleston Renaissance [ca. 1915-1940]. The Charleston Renaissance was a multifaceted cultural renewal. Artists, musicians, writers, historians, and preservationists—individually and in groups—fueled a revival that reshaped the city’s destiny. The Renaissance benefitted from a large number of books, many illustrated with paintings and prints by local artists. One story, more than any other, brought national attention to Charleston: the tale of Porgy by DuBose Heyward. It appeared first as a novel, then a play, and, in 1935, as the folk opera Porgy and Bess.

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