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Former Mayor Joe Riley celebrates the announcement the money needed to build the International African American Museum has been raised
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

The Charleston Maritime Museum was packed Thursday with a who’s who of community leaders, as well as local and state dignitaries.  Former, long time Charleston City Mayor Joe Riley could barely contain his excitement as he stepped up to the podium. 

“Today we’ve asked all of you to join us to tell you that the dream of the International African American Museum shared by so many will be a reality,” he said.  “We have met our $75 million fundraising goal.”

File photo: Soccer balls
Joe Shlabotnik [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Evidence of soccer’s enormous growth in America is the September kickoff of the inaugural season of the Midlands’ new semi-pro soccer team, the Soda City Football Club.  It’s the third team in the state in the 170-plus team United Premier Soccer League, joining Spartanburg and Charleston.  Coach and co-owner Patrick Burnette says soccer is exploding in the U.S., and thanks to small but dedicated clubs around the state, the talent pool is strong.  Player Hunter Haynes says it’s all he’s ever wanted to do, and like teammate Nestor Jaramillo (and the rest of the team, for that matter), he aspi

Richland Library's Tony Tallent displays a newly-dispensed short story from one of three new short story dispensers at the library's main branch in downtown Columbia.
Clayton Sears

During its recent Learn Freely Fest, Richland Library launched newly-acquired short story dispensers for the public to try. The sleek, black and organge device allows people to select a one, three or five minute story to print. Richland Library is one of only four libraries across the country to receive the dispensers. Its a part of a program called Fostering Creative Community Connections, a project to promote reading; community engagement; library programs and services; and creative expression from diverse writers.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z will perform at Williams-Brice stadium on August 21 as part of their On the Run II Tour.
Wikimedia Commons

August 21 will bring the first concert in five years to Columbia’s Williams-Brice Stadium  when Beyoncé and Jay-Z make a stop on their On the Run II Tour.

For Columbia local and Beyoncé superfan Merrell Johnson, this is an especially big event.

V.C. Summer Units 2 and 3 Aerial View, Jan. 2017.
SCANA

It was the first week of August, 2017 when then SCANA and SCE&G CEO Kevin Marsh told state regulators that the $9 Billion V.C. Summer Nuclear Reactor project was being scrapped before it could produce a single kilowatt of power. The magnitude of the action set off a tumultuous year that has left the futures of SCE&G and its partner in the project, state owned utility Santee-Cooper in doubt.

There are more than 400 different license plate designs for autos in South Carolina.  They range from the standard "While I Breathe I Hope" tags to include colleges, veterans, Parrotheads and vanity plates like this one.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Most, if not all, states offer a variety of license tags for automobiles. South Carolina offers more than 400, many to support causes or organizations, from colleges to gold star families, or wildlife and habitats, from trees to turkeys and elk. Some are offered out of support and respect, such as veterans or POWs. Some are more whimsical features of South Carolina culture, like the shag dance, or even Parrotheads, the fanatical followers of Jimmy Buffett.

U.S. Air Force/Pascual Flores

For the past couple of months a group of state regulators, utility executives, representatives of the state’s fledgling solar energy industry, and environmentalists have been meeting in Columbia trying to come together on a new plan that could determine the future of residential solar energy use in the state.

Korean War Veterans Monument at Memorial Park in Columbia, SC
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Over 100 soldiers from South Carolina are still missing and unaccounted for, from the Korean War. July 27 marks the 65th anniversary of the armistice that ended the war. The war started in June of 1950 and over the span of three years, more than 36,000 American soldiers were killed. Friday, remains believed to be of 55 US troops killed during the War, were returned to the United States by North Korea.

Clyde Gore, Jr. is director of the new legal clinic. He said the work done at the clinic can make a big change in the life of a veteran.
Clayton Sears/SC Public Radio

The Department of Veterans Affairs has identified legal services as one of the most significant unmet needs of homeless and poor veterans. The University of South Carolina's School of Law recently opened a free, veterans legal clinic to address this demand.

 

 

The clinic is located on the third floor of the law school, open from 9am to 5pm weekdays and follows the university's holiday schedule. Walk-ins are welcome, but director Clyde Gore, Jr. recommends making an appointment.

Experts Say Nurse Practitioner Law to Benefit Underserved Communities

Jul 25, 2018
Nurse practitioner Kelli Garber consults with a patient through telehealth at C.E. Murray High School in Williamsburg County.
Tabitha Safdi/SCETV

A new law that went into effect July 1 drastically changed the way advanced practice nurses can provide care in South Carolina.

Senate Bill 345, which Gov. Henry McMaster signed into law earlier this year, eliminated the 45-mile limit for advanced practice nurses (APRNs) to provide care. Prior to the new law, APRNs had to be within a 45-mile radius of a supervising physician in order to practice.

A four-year journey: Jake and Sherry Jaco inside the Olympia Mill school during the construction phase of the museum
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

Columbia has a rich history of being a cotton/textile mill town. The Olympia and Granby Mills are located just outside of the downtown area, next to the Congaree river. Like many places in Columbia, this historic area is growing. The Olympia-Granby Historical Foundation was created in 2014 to promote activities within the Olympia and Granby Mill Villages. Since then, the group has also worked  to bring new life to the building that served as the one-room, Olympia School. Foundation members Sherry and Jake Jaco talk about their four-year journey to preserve history.

The Future of Crab Bank; A Coastal Bird Sanctuary

Jul 24, 2018
The remnants of Crab Bank at the entrance of Mount Pleasant's Shem Creek
David Quick

Chris Crolley wears a long, grey, shirt only those who work in the sun instinctively know to wear.  His blue eyes reflect some of the button-up’s hue, as he looks out beneath his worn, woven hat with a small, winged pin.  He knows what makes tourists and locals alike go “ahhh”.  He’s been giving tours of Mount Pleasant’s Shem Creek for 30 years.

After-School Nutrition Program Reaches Rural Communities

Jul 18, 2018
Students at Hopkins Elementary School gather for after-school nutrition class taught by DHEC nutrition educators through telehealth.
Julia Shillinglaw/SCETV

Dozens of students participate in an after-school program at Hopkins Elementary School in rural Richland County. After most of their classmates have gone home for the day, these kids go to the library. Plates, pasta shells, and measuring cups are scattered across the tables. And they’re focused on the TV.

USC sleep specialist Dr. Antoinette Rutherford says there's a cure for everyone who snores - it's just a matter of finding the right method for each individual.
Nick Wilkes [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Snoring can ruin the sleep of millions of South Carolinians, and it doesn’t do the snorer any good, either.  Sleep expert Dr. Robert Puchalski says vibrations in the throat cause snoring, and by the passing of air through a tight space in the upper airway, in the way that wind instruments create sound.  At least half of people snore, according to USC sleep specialist Dr.

hoto from the University of South Carolina's Motion Image Research Collection.
Photo from the University of South Carolina's Motion Image Research Collection.

At the University of South Carolina, the Moving Image Research Collection has established a reputation as one of the top film archives in the country. Curator Greg Wilsbacher says Newsfilm Collections at USC has received some notable donations over the years—including footage from the United States Marine Corps. But it all started with a donation in 1980 from the Fox Corporation, containing countless hours of newsreels and outtakes from the turn of the 20th Century.

FBI Will Use Another Database For Gun Background Checks

Jul 17, 2018
FBI

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is planning a major change to its gun background check system in an effort to keep  more weapons out of the wrong hands.   

Examiners will be given access to a large, previously untapped database of more than 400 million records as they determine when gun purchases can go through nationwide.  But for the survivors and victims’ families in a Charleston, South Carolina church massacre, the change did not come soon enough.

Katherine Escobar / Escobar Photography

It’s a common plot for an opera: an endangered female character awaits rescue from the male lead.  But Ludwig van Beethoven wasn’t generally one to settle for common.

In his opera Fidelio, it is the female protagonist who saves the day. Disguising herself as a prison guard named “Fidelio,” the courageous Leonore rescues her ailing husband, Florestan, from his imprisonment.

Electronic Medical Records Critical for Telehealth

Jul 16, 2018
Michael Haschker leads discussion around new telehealth equipment at the sixth annual Telehealth Summit of South Carolina in Columbia.
Tabitha Safdi/SCETV

As technology changes the way patients and health care providers see each other, it’s also changing how our doctors document our health records.

More practices in South Carolina are using telehealth equipment, allowing clinicians to connect to patients through video. The South Carolina Telehealth Alliance’s Michael Haschker says integrating an electronic medical records system into that equipment is crucial for the success of any telehealth program.

These vats at Columbia microbrewery Hunter Gatherer yield locally crafted beer popular with Midlands beer connoisseurs.
Clay Sears/SC Public Radio

Small scale brewing operations like River Rat and Hunter Gatherer in Columbia are representative of the growing craft beer industry in South Carolina and nationwide. For this story we spoke with Kevin Varner, founder of Hunter Gatherer Brewing, about the laws he helped pass back in 1995 that gave brewers more freedom to run their operations. We also sat down with River Rat brewmaster Drew Walker, who talked about how brewers work to stay on top of such a rapidly changing industry.

Remembering Friendship Nine Member James Wells

Jul 10, 2018
Friendship Nine member James Wells
SCETV

57 years ago, nine young African-American students of Friendship Junior College in Rock Hill were arrested for attempting to desegregate the all-white lunch counter at the McCrory's variety store. One of those students was James Wells. He died Sunday, July 8th in his hometown of Rock Hill. The decision Wells and the other young protesters made, following their arrests, would help shape the civil rights movement throughout the South. 

Members of a mission team from Chapin United Methodist Church (Chapin UMC) expected to fly back to the United States Monday after being delayed in Haiti for two days because of protests, have safely made it to the airport in Port Au Prince. Jody Flowers is lead pastor of the Lexington County church. Monday morning he said they were cautiously optimistic about the news of the group leaving the country.

pngimg.com

Friday was a special day for lovers of the Southern diet: National Fried Chicken Day!

A Maersk Line container ship approaching the ravenel bridge in Charleston.
SC Ports Authority

  According to a recent analysis by the U.S Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina will be among the state’s hit hardest by the looming trade war, threatening the more than $30 Billion dollars in goods exported from the state each year.  The state exports cars, steel products, refrigerators, soybeans and many other goods putting it in the top three states in the country that relies on exports and imports.

According to the U. S. Chamber, almost 580,000  jobs in the state are tied to trade, and there are more than 6,000 companies operating here that export goods around the world.

Emergency Mental Health Care Benefits from Telepsychiatry

Jul 2, 2018
An EMS and DMH Mobile Crisis Telepsychiatry vehicle.
Julia Shillinglaw

Seconds count when it comes to a suicidal patient and getting them to the care they need. EMS personnel often find themselves dealing with mental health patients. Because they do not have psychiatry expertise, EMS often has to transport these patients to the ER where they will sit until they can get a correct diagnosis. However, this could take hours and leads to the emergency vehicles being tied up while they may be needed for more urgent needs in their county.

Students Create Computer Games and Apps at Girls Go for IT Camp

Jun 29, 2018
Instructor Jaya Gantt, a recent graduate of USC, teaches 6th-grader Kenney Williams and other students at Girls Go for I.T. camp.
Laura Hunsberger

During the last two weeks of June, the University of South Carolina's School of Earth, Ocean and Environment was home to Girls Go for I.T., a camp for middle school-age girls who are interested in learning about computer science and programming. South Carolina Public Radio's Laura Hunsberger and Clayton Sears went to USC's campus to see what the girls are creating and to talk with the professors who started the program, Dr.

State House Week for July 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018
State House Week
SC Public Radio

This year's session of the SC General Assembly has finally ends, as lawmakers pass a wide-ranging plan to address the V.C. Summer nuclear debacle.

SC Lede: Have A Great V.C. Summer

Jun 28, 2018
Gavin Jackson (l) speaks with Jamie Lovegrove and Andy Brown (r) on Thursday, June 28, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

As South Carolina Lede heads into summer hiatus, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier reporters Jamie Lovegrove and Andy Brown to discuss the results of the Republican gubernatorial primary runoff as well as legislation passed by state lawmakers this week dealing with the failed V.C. Summer nuclear project.

President Trump at Airport High School
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

President Trump rallied with Gov. Henry McMaster at Airport High School in West Columbia. The 71-year old McMaster is competing with 39-year old Greenville businessman John Warren for the Republican nomination. Recent polls show the two candidates in a tight race.

Monday night storms delayed Airforce One from landing briefly. The President made his appearance just before 8PM; he referred to McMaster as a friend and joked that storms got so bad, pilots suggested turning around.

Danny Flores (left) and fellow Community Leadership Corps participants took part in training exercises with the Obama Foundation at the Richland Library earlier this month.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

On Saturday, June 16, around 50 young adults, ages 18 to 25, gathered in the Richland Main Library in Columbia. All of them, in some capacity, were activists, hoping to gain the skills to influence change in their own communities with the training of the Obama Foundation as members of its newly minted Community Leadership Corps, or CLC.

SC Lede: Primary Runoff Pregame

Jun 21, 2018
Gavin Jackson (r) speaks with Jamie Lovegrove and Meg Kinnard (l) on Thursday, June 21, 2018.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Jamie Lovegrove, statehouse reporter for The Post and Courier, and Meg Kinnard, South Carolina reporter for The Associated Press, to break down this week's primary runoff debate between Republican gubernatorial candidates Gov. Henry McMaster and John Warren. 

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