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SC Lede: Shining A Light On Conversion Therapy

Oct 9, 2018
Gavin Jackson speaks with Mary Katherine Wildeman (l) and Michael Majchrowicz (r) in The Post and Courier's Charleston offices.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Post and Courier Reporters Mary Katherine Wildeman and Michael Majchrowicz to delve into their enlightening story “Taught to Hate Myself." The piece takes an in-depth look at the controversial practice of gay conversion therapy in South Carolina, where it faces no oversight or regulation.

South Carolina Public Radio's own Statehouse reporter Russ McKinney also stops by to quiz Gavin with South Carolina trivia in this week's Did You Know segment.

Coming Home to Conway after the Flood

Oct 5, 2018
Bill and Diane Parker sit outside their flood ravaged home in Conway.
Victoria Hansen

Two weeks after the president visited their neighborhood in Conway, Bill and Diane Parker sit on a sofa in their front yard, surrounded by furniture.  They’ve just come home for the first time since Hurricane Florence’s flood waters ravaged their Sherwood community, east of downtown.  The damage is worse than they imagined.

“I would lie in bed at night and think about each room,” Diane Parker said.  “What did I leave?  What’s there that is possibly going to be ruined”.

Walks Aim to Highlight Suicide Prevention

Oct 5, 2018
AFSP

Suicide is on the rise in nearly every state (Nevada is the exception), the 10th leading cause of death both in South Carolina and nationally, and for ages 15-34, the second leading cause of death in both state and nation.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that suicide is up a distressing 38 percent in the Palmetto State.  Though it’s too early to know just why the rate is climbing so high, Helen Pridgen, South Carolina Area Director for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, listed some reasons that might suggest an explanation.  Though most people who die by

SC Lede: How Lindsey Graham Got His Groove Back

Oct 2, 2018

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove to talk about about Sen. Lindsey Graham’s newfound respect from conservatives following his heated defense of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh last week. Graham’s lambasting of Senate Democrats over the handling of the hearing involving Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Kavanaugh of past sexual misconduct, has fired up the conservative base that for years has been leery of Graham.

Georgetown Braces for Florence's Final Stop

Sep 28, 2018

The city of Georgetown may get a bit of a reprieve as Hurricane’s Florence’s flood waters make a final push before heading out to sea.  Georgetown County officials now say an updated flood anticipation map from the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources shows a much improved forecast and is encouraging people who have evacuated to take a look and decide if it’s safe to return. That certainly was not the case a couple of days ago.

FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance teams are working in South Carolina areas affected by Hurricane Florence, but survivors with uninsured or underinsured losses should not wait for one of these teams to arrive before they register with FEMA.

DSA teams are equipped with latest mobile technology allowing them to register survivors for disaster assistance, update their records and make referrals to community partners. Team members tailor the information and services they provide to the individual survivor's needs.

  Today at 10:00 a.m. EDT

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, are testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Watch the proceeding live.

SC Lede: Life After Florence

Sep 25, 2018

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier's Joe Cranney and Associated Press' Meg Kinnard to discuss the aftermath of Hurricane Florence and the record flooding that continues to affect us and could result in billions of dollars in damages.

South Carolina Public Radio's own Statehouse Reporter Russ McKinney also stops by to quiz Gavin with South Carolina trivia in this week's Did You Know segment.

Neighborhood near Crabtree Swamp Evacuated by National Guard
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

The day before President Trump visited Conway, Doug and Sissy Owen got a knock on their door.  It was the National Guard advising them to seek higher ground in 48 hours, well before the weekend when the Waccamaw River is  expected to crest.

“Thank God that we had notice and time to move everything out,” said Doug Owen.  “I can’t imagine

how these other people are who didn’t have any time.”

Debbie Long and Morgan Sellers embrace as the street quickly floods
Victoria Hansen

The Waccamaw River has yet to crest and people who fled Conway before Hurricane Florence and returned are now evacuating, either on their own or being forced to go.

Debbie Long helped her mother-in-law move out of a neighborhood east of town near Crabtree Swamp just days before the National Guard moved in, pulling people from their homes.  So how high was the water?

“I don’t know,” she said.  “The fire ants are doing their thing where they float and if you get close to them they will swim to you.  I’ve already been bitten.”

U.S. Air Force Security Forces Airmen assigned to the South Carolina Air National Guard, 169th Fighter Wing, assist Florence County, S.C., Sheriff's Department with evacuation efforts in Florence, S.C., Sept. 17, 2018.
U.S. Army National Guard/Staff Sgt. Jorge Intriago

The South Carolina Emergency Response Team is monitoring and preparing for the water levels of rivers to rise. The forecast is for the Waccamaw, Lynches, Little Pee Dee and Big Pee Dee rivers to crest this weekend and into early next week

The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) continues to be fully operational, staffed by emergency personnel from multiple state agencies and emergency organizations. The SEOC will be operational 24 hours a day until further notice.

Residents should consider the following safety measures:

Updated 11:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Florence weakened to a tropical depression Sunday morning, the National Hurricane Center said, but flooding continued to be a major danger throughout the Carolinas.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said the storm is more dangerous now than when it made landfall. "Flood waters are still raging across parts of our state, and the risk to life is rising with the angry waters," Cooper said in a news conference on Sunday.

"The threat of flooded roads keeps spreading," Cooper continued.

There IS an end in sight. It’s just not anytime soon for those that need it the most.

Even though all tropical storm warnings have been cancelled, the persistent heavy rain and flash flooding from Tropical Storm Florence will continue for several more hours in portions of North and South Carolina.

The heavy rain and flood risk will then spread across the Mid-State of North Carolina and areas along and north of I-20 in South Carolina Saturday Night.  

Hurricane-force winds roared through the cracks around Randy Wood's garage door, shook his house, and stripped his property's pine trees, strewing one limb after the next in his yard. Accompanying the roar of the storm was the steady ticking whirr of Wood's generator and his own matter-of-fact voice, tinged by his Carolinas accent, explaining why he decided to stay in his home in Conway, S.C., directly in the path of Hurricane Florence.

Santee Cooper

Reports from Santee Cooper indicated that as of 3:30 p.m. Friday, some 38,900 Santee Cooper retail customers were without power due to early impacts from Hurricane Florence. Earlier in the afternoon outages peaked at 39,200, and crews were able to restore about 9,000 customers today before the outages increased again.

On the transmission side, three lines were locked out, impacting customers of Santee Cooper, Horry Electric Cooperative and Santee Electric Cooperative.

Florence: It's Now All About the Flooding

Sep 14, 2018

Hurricane Florence has slowed and is now crawling to the west at 6 mph. Life-threatening storm surge, inland flooding, and wind damage are imminent along the coast of North Carolina from Wilmington to the Outer Banks and stretching to northern portions of South Carolina through the day on Friday. Florence is forecast to move southwest along the coastline before turning to the northeast on Sunday.

As Hurricane Florence slams North Carolina, the riverfront city of New Bern is already feeling the impacts. Emergency crews are attempting to respond to more than a hundred calls for rescues.

Amber Parker, spokesperson for Craven County, North Carolina, tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson that officials are happy to have daylight on their side Friday.

Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, on Friday morning. The effects of the storm are being felt even further inland, with widespread reports of flooding.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with meteorologist Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp).

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

In the days leading up to the arrival of Hurricane Florence, North Carolina's governor offered a series of dire warnings.

"Even if you've ridden out storms before, this one is different," Gov. Roy Cooper said.

As Hurricane Florence made landfall, it appeared many North Carolinians had listened.

Many in the Charleston Area Shelter in Place for Florence

Sep 14, 2018
Charleston area gas station runs out of fuel
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Just hours before hurricane Florence slammed into North Carolina, Dallas Cone and his nearly 1 year-old daughter Hannah sat in the sand on Sullivan’s Island just outside of Charleston enjoying the cool breeze and growing waves.  He admitted his family was poised to leave, but changed their mind at the very last minute.

“We did board up yesterday expecting the worst,” he said.  “But I think it’s going to be north of us right now.”

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

More than 100 people were waiting to be rescued from homes and vehicles Friday morning in New Bern, N.C., after Hurricane Florence brought severe flooding to the area. Officials say more than 100 people have already been rescued in the area overnight.

Six swift water rescue teams have been working since Thursday afternoon to evacuate individuals and families, in some cases, from the roofs of their homes, the New Bern Public Information Officer Colleen Roberts said Friday afternoon.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET Saturday

Tropical Storm Florence is still a slow-moving giant that poses danger to people in North and South Carolina, as its storm surge and intense rains bring high floodwaters to towns both on the coast and inland.

The storm has been linked to at least five deaths, a toll that is expected to climb.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hurricane Florence is now only moving at 5 mph.  This will prolong the risks of life-threatening storm surge and wind damage, which are imminent along the coast of North Carolina from Wilmington to the Outer Banks.  

The first tornado warned cell associated with outer bands of Florence moved through portions of the Inner Banks of North Carolina just after 11 am, with two more following shortly thereafter. Tornadoes are still possible across eastern North Carolina through Friday, where a Tornado Watch is in effect until further notice.

South Carolina Braced for Hurricane Florence

Sep 13, 2018

The South Carolina Emergency Response Team continues to track Hurricane Florence and remains fully dedicated to preparing for the storm's potential impact on South Carolina. Forecasters say that Florence is currently a Category 2 hurricane with the capacity to bring record amounts of rain to South Carolina. The State Emergency Operations Center is fully operational, staffed by emergency personnel from various state agencies and emergency organizations. The SEOC will be operational 24 hours a day until further notice.

Santee Cooper line workers stock trucks in Myrtle Beach on Thursday, in advance of Hurricane Florence.
Courtesy of Santee Cooper

Santee Cooper will have approximately 130 line and tree crews –roughly four times the number during normal conditions - working to restore outages on its system caused by Hurricane Florence, including more than 70 mutual aid and contract crews coming from Florida, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana and Missouri.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

Storm surges of 9 to 13 feet and rainfall up to 40 inches: Those are two of the most dire warnings about Hurricane Florence's effect on parts of North and South Carolina. Thousands have heeded evacuation orders; others are hoping to cope with the storm in their homes or at local shelters.

South Carolina writer Mary Alice Monroe is one of the many Palmetto State authors and poets to be featured in the new ETV series "By the River," which can be seen Thursday nights at 8 p.m. beginning Sept. 13.
Courtesy Mary Alice Monroe

South Carolina is blessed with gifted writers. To celebrate this gift, a new program, “By the River,” premieres on ETV Thursday, Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. Produced by ETV and USC-Beaufort, the show will feature in-depth conversations with Palmetto State authors and poets set against the backdrop of the Beaufort River. 

Many seaports and airports along the southeastern U.S. coastline have been shut down, more than 1,000 flights have been canceled, and some highways and bridges in low-lying coastal areas could close soon, as Hurricane Florence gets closer to making landfall.

Authorities in coastal areas that lie in the path of the massive storm are urging residents one last time to evacuate.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster's message is pretty blunt: If you live in an evacuation zone, hit the road soon.

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