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South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Praise houses. “Praise houses” (sometimes called “prayer houses”) functioned on antebellum South Carolina plantations as both the epitome of slave culture and symbols of resistance to slaveholders’ oppressive version of Christianity. Generally simple, clapboard structures built by the slaves themselves, praise houses were erected with the knowledge of the master class. Meetings in the praise house usually occurred on weeknights, rather than Sunday mornings. The simple architecture of the praise house mirrored the style of slave religion.

Photographing Veterans after Capturing Combat

Aug 21, 2018
Elizabeth Barker Johnson holds her 1943 Army portrait
Veterans Portrait Project images by Stacy L. Pearsall

Stacy Pearsall's office is tucked away in an upstairs bedroom of her Charleston area home.  Her service dog Charlie checks in occasionally, tail wagging, making sure she's alright.  Above her desk, hangs a collection of spoons; small, some silver, simple and ornate.  Stacy says she handpicked them for a loved one during her travels overseas, someone who has since passed away.  They reflect her love of service and a discerning eye.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Like many 19th-century composers, Robert Schumann often gave his works picturesque titles. Schumann’s Scenes from Childhood, for example, a set of pieces for solo piano, includes pieces with titles such as “Pleading Child,” and “Frightening.”  How literally should we take these titles – and perhaps the picturesque titles of other composers’ works? 

The larva for the Rustic Sphinx moth, Manduca rustica.
homie00001 [CC BY-SA 2.0] via Flickr

A listener finds a caterpillar for a Rustic Sphynx Moth.

Sharing Family Assets

Aug 21, 2018
Eddi Kramer
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

Young children are often reminded by their parents of the importance of sharing, especially with their brothers and sisters.  Our next guest though, says that adult siblings can find sharing a little more difficult, when there’s a beach house or some other property involved.  Not to mention if there are in-laws, nieces and nephews involved, as well.  What should the rules be for sharing family assets?

Mike Switzer interviews Eddie Kramer, a certified financial planner with Abacus Planning Group in Columbia, SC.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Montgomery, John Henry (1833-1902). Manufacturer, merchant. In the late 1850s Montgomery farmed and entered into general merchandising business. After service in the Civil War, he continued his farming and mercantile activities. In 1874 he moved to Spartanburg joined a firm that was largest cotton buyer in the county. He and his partners organized the Pacolet Manufacturing Company that began operations in 1884. Montgomery was president and treasurer of the company. Under his leadership, the company expanded to three mills.

Suicide Prevention

Aug 21, 2018

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Tracy Stecker about help and treatment available for people who suffer from suicidal thoughts. Dr. Stecker is a Psychologist and Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing at MUSC.

Marlene VerPlanck on Piano Jazz

Aug 20, 2018

This week, Piano Jazz remembers Marlene VerPlanck (1933 – January 14, 2018), who died from cancer this year at age 84. One of the finest interpreters of American Popular Song, VerPlanck’s artistic sensitivity made her a favorite of songwriters and listeners alike. As a studio singer, she was sought out by everyone from Frank Sinatra to KISS, and she also had a dynamic career as a solo performer. She was McPartland’s guest in 1999. In this session, VerPlanck joins McPartland to sing “Skylark” and “Our Love is Here to Stay.”

Scherzo 2

Aug 20, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Beethoven replaced the minuet in his four-movement pieces with the scherzo. Scherzo means “joke,” in Italian, but in Beethoven’s scherzos you won’t usually find anything that qualifies as out-‘n-out funny. What you usually will find is a certain playfulness, with lots of fast notes, abrupt accents, surprises, and quick changes of musical direction. 


John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner is co-founder of Concepts to Companies and founder and CEO of Swampfox, an entrepreneur-centric social media company, based in Greenville, S.C.

The Dobsonfly

Aug 20, 2018
A female Dobsonfly
Andreas McKay [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

The female Dobsonfly has strong pincers, though they are smaller than the male's.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Montagu, Lord Charles Greville (1741-1784). Governor. In 1766 Montagu was appointed governor of South Carolina. During the first three years he managed to settle differences between backcountry settlers and coastal residents—and supporting an act that established circuit courts throughout the colony. In 1769 he sailed to England and did not return until 1771. He was embroiled in a controversy with the Commons House over its control of funding the colony’s budget. His attempt to relocate the capital to Beaufort created a furor.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Mark Rubinstein about cancer immunotherapy research related to advanced lung cancer.  Dr. Rubinstein is a Cancer Immunologist at Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC.

Written on print: Spartanburg, S.C. Saxon Mills; "Girl workers in the half-time mill school."
Library of Congress/Goldsberry Collection of open-air school photographs.

(Originally broadcast 03/02/18) - There were progressives in South Carolina in 1918. And the progressive movement in this state was different from the movement in the Northeast. However, the United States’ entrance into World War I provided an extra momentum to the movement that led to some fundamental changes the interaction between state and federal authority that lasted through the 20th century.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Blueberries, figs,  and muscadines are plants good for  backyard orchard s–   you don’t have to do much as far as insect or disease control goes. Elderberry is another plant you might add to your backyard if you have some room. In other parts of the country, there are lots of both commercial and home orchards of elderberry but for some reason we haven’t used them much in the south. But Dr.

Former Mayor Joe Riley celebrates the announcement the money needed to build the International African American Museum has been raised
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

The Charleston Maritime Museum was packed Thursday with a who’s who of community leaders, as well as local and state dignitaries.  Former, long time Charleston City Mayor Joe Riley could barely contain his excitement as he stepped up to the podium. 

“Today we’ve asked all of you to join us to tell you that the dream of the International African American Museum shared by so many will be a reality,” he said.  “We have met our $75 million fundraising goal.”

File photo: Soccer balls
Joe Shlabotnik [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Evidence of soccer’s enormous growth in America is the September kickoff of the inaugural season of the Midlands’ new semi-pro soccer team, the Soda City Football Club.  It’s the third team in the state in the 170-plus team United Premier Soccer League, joining Spartanburg and Charleston.  Coach and co-owner Patrick Burnette says soccer is exploding in the U.S., and thanks to small but dedicated clubs around the state, the talent pool is strong.  Player Hunter Haynes says it’s all he’s ever wanted to do, and like teammate Nestor Jaramillo (and the rest of the team, for that matter), he aspi

Richland Library's Tony Tallent displays a newly-dispensed short story from one of three new short story dispensers at the library's main branch in downtown Columbia.
Clayton Sears

During its recent Learn Freely Fest, Richland Library launched newly-acquired short story dispensers for the public to try. The sleek, black and organge device allows people to select a one, three or five minute story to print. Richland Library is one of only four libraries across the country to receive the dispensers. Its a part of a program called Fostering Creative Community Connections, a project to promote reading; community engagement; library programs and services; and creative expression from diverse writers.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Sudie Back about treatment available for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse.  Dr. Back is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Drug Abuse Research Training Program at MUSC, and she is a staff psychologist at the Ralph H Johnson VA Medical Center. 

Scherzo 1

Aug 17, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

During the time of Haydn and Mozart, the third movement of a four-movement piece such as a symphony or string quartet was invariably a stylized dance movement called a minuet. By the end of the 1700's, though, Beethoven, in one of his many innovations, had largely replaced the minuet with a movement he called a “scherzo.” 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Busbee, Cyril B. (1908-2001). Educator. In his early years Busbee was a teacher, coach, and administrator in various schools in Georgia and South Carolina. In 1943 he moved to Brookland-Cayce Schools (later Lexington District Two), where he rose to superintendent. After service in World War II he returned to the district where he remained as superintendent for twenty-one years. As an administrator, he was considered quite teacher-oriented. In 1966, he was elected state Superintendent of Education and was twice re-elected—serving until 1979.

The Pine Snake

Aug 17, 2018
A Pine Snake
Glenn Bartolotti [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons

A listener finds a snake that is seldom seen in South Carolina, though they live throughout the state.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. In the New World, the first kaolin clay mined for shipment back to England to be used in fine china came from the colony of South Carolina, and today we are second only to Georgia for kaolin extraction. We spoke about how kaolin clay sprayed on vegetables and fruits helps prevent insect feeding, but it also can prevent sunburn. Just like zinc oxide protects my nose from the sun, a coating of this white clay film protects tomato fruits from sunscald and tissue necrosis.

If you are a small business owner and have always wanted to work with NASA, you may want to know that they are going to be participating in a business expo (and a STEM expo for students) on August 29th in Charleston, SC.

Mike Switzer interviews Kevin Limehouse with the Charleston County governmentNASA Business Expo and Stem Expo in Charleston, SC.

Mystery Bird's Nest

Aug 16, 2018
A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher nest.
USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab [Public Domain Mark 1.0] via Flickr

The Blue-Gray Gnat Catcher lives here in the warmer months. They build nests of spider silk or caterpillar silk, and cover them with lichens.

Syncopation 2

Aug 16, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Syncopation disturbs the regular flow of rhythm and it shifts the emphasis in music from strong beats to weak beats, or to in-between beats. I’d like to stress, though, that syncopation is a general term: there’s no limit to the number or variety of possible syncopated rhythms or syncopated patterns, and no limit to the ways they may be used. 


South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Burton, Edward Milby (1898-1977). Museum director, naturalist, historian. As a young man Burton had an avid interest in hunting and fishing that led to an interest in natural history. In 1930 he joined the board of the Charleston Museum and two years later was appointed its director. He set out to enlarge the museum’s collections of freshwater fish (personally adding 3,156 specimens). During the late 1930s he secured the historic Joseph Manigault House for the museum, thereby saving it from destruction. During World War II, he served in the U.S.

Why No Fruit?

Aug 16, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Lots of calls are coming to   Extension offices about vegetable plants that have lush and plentiful foliage    but are not setting fruits, especially beans and tomatoes. There are several factors at play. One is high night time temperatures. Tony Melton explains that plants cool themselves by a process called transpiration – basically sweating.

Mike Pope
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans recycle around 66 million tons of plastic bottles, aluminum cans, and scrap metal, etc. each year.  But then China threw a kink into things when they announced last summer that they would no longer accept "foreign garbage" which includes recyclables.  The Solid Waste Association of North America says these restrictions have disrupted recycling programs throughout the United States, and we were wondering how our state is being affected.

Syncopation 1

Aug 15, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

There’s an old joke about the husband who’s been out late drinking, and when his wife asks him where he’s been, he latches onto a word he saw on the cover of a book in the window of a music store, and he says that unfortunately he had come down with a case of… syncopation. 


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