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South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Burt, Armistead (1802-1883). Congressman. After attending Pendleton Academy, Burt married John C. Calhoun’s niece and became his protégé. He supported Calhoun’s opposition to the Tariff of 1828 and was the secretary of the 1832 Nullification Convention. He sat in Congress for ten years (1843-1853). Burt was an accepted spokesman in the House for Calhoun’s prosouthern policy, particularly preserving states’ rights, reducing tariffs, and maintaining the balance between free and slave states in the Senate.

Ghost Shrimp

Aug 15, 2018
A Ghost Shrimp
Ken-ichi Ueda [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

This ghostly-white shrimp burrows in the sand and mud near the edge of the ocean.

Using Kaolin Clay

Aug 15, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Kaolin clay is a nuisance in garden soil; unlike red clay, it’s basically inert, low in electrical charges that hold nutrients and water, and is even more gluey and sticky if you can image that. However, it has a several uses for commercial growers and home gardeners. When kaolin clay is sprayed on plants, it forms a barrier, coating the leaves and fruits with a white film which protects them from damage by certain insects, including thrips and other leaf and fruit eating pests.

Sarah Park
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

You may have heard a recent program of ours that highlighted the difficulties experienced by people with disabilities in finding satisfying jobs.  The youth in our state can find this challenge even more daunting because in most cases, they have never had any job experience of any kind.  Our next guest, however, is working with the local business community to alleviate that situation.

NOAA photos of the US East Coast lights the night before and the night of the August 14, 2003 blackout which left nearly 50 million people without power.
Evan [CC BY-NC 2.0] /NOAA via Flickr

Jeff InglisThe Conversation

On Aug. 14, 2003, a software bug contributed to a blackout that left 50 million people across nine U.S. northeastern states and a Canadian province without power. The outage lasted for as long as four days, with rolling blackouts in some areas for days after that.

That event wasn’t caused by an attacker, but many of the recommendations of the final incident report focused on cybersecurity. Fifteen years later, the stakes of a long-term outage are even higher, as American business and society are even more dependent on electronic devices. 

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Powder Magazine (Charleston). In 1703 the colonial assembly authorized the construction of a storehouse for gunpowder as part of the defenses of Charleston. The Powder Magazine was built on the northern edge of the walled city in 1713. The one-story brick structure has a pyramidal tile roof with cross gables and a single room measuring approximately twenty-seven feet square. The walls are thirty-six inches thick. The National Society of the Colonial Dames in South Carolina purchased the building in 1902 to save it from demolition—and turned it into a museum.

Yellowfin Shiners

Aug 14, 2018
Notropis lutipinnis, Yellowfin Shiner, male.
Georgia DNR Wildlife Resources [CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] via Flickr

A listener spots bright red fish swimming in a school near Lake Jocassee and wonders what kind they are. The male Yellowfin Shiner turns red during spawning season.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z will perform at Williams-Brice stadium on August 21 as part of their On the Run II Tour.
Wikimedia Commons

August 21 will bring the first concert in five years to Columbia’s Williams-Brice Stadium  when Beyoncé and Jay-Z make a stop on their On the Run II Tour.

For Columbia local and Beyoncé superfan Merrell Johnson, this is an especially big event.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Alyssa Rheingold about coping with grief and the importance of staying connected with friends and family.   Dr. Rheingold is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and she is Director of Clinical Operations of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at MUSC.

Most people know that most investing involves some risk.  But our next guest says that he sees some investors going to great lengths to avoid risk at all costs.

Mike Switzer interviews Jeff Wildes, a certified financial planner in Georgetown, SC.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. My new sunscreen has zinc oxide in it; it actually forms a physical barrier to protect my skin from sunburn. Believe it or not, sunburn is a serious issue for many fruits and vegetables, too. Sunburn necrosis occurs when vegetable’s skin or peel which receives direct sunlight reaches a certain temperature and the tissue is killed. It’s the temperature of the fruit’s skin – not the air temperature – that’s critical.

Stefon Harris on Piano Jazz

Aug 13, 2018
Stefon Harris at the North Sea Jazz Festival 2007.
Siebe van Ineveld [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Vibraphonist Stefon Harris is one of the most innovative and impressive artists in jazz, blazing new trails on vibraphone and marimba. While much of his music is on the cutting edge, he has a strong sense of tradition and his technical facility knows no bounds. On this 2002 Piano Jazz, Harris shows off his fresh, clear sound on a number of duets with McPartland, including “Whisper Not,” “Blue Monk,” and “Bemsha Swing.” McPartland solos on her own “Twilight World.”

News & Talk Stations: Sat, Aug 18, 8 pm | News & Music Stations: Aug 19, 7 pm

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

Already during their lifetimes, Antonin Dvorák and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky were among the most famous composers in the world. Their music is extremely sophisticated, the product of highly skilled composers, and their beautiful melodies have always been especially beloved.

"P" is for Poultry

Aug 13, 2018
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Poultry. The humble chicken has risen from the obscurity of the barnyard to the summit of South Carolina agriculture. In the late twentieth century the poultry industry (broilers, turkeys, and eggs) became the state’s leading agribusiness, contributing $500 million annually to the state’s economy. Before chickens and turkeys were cash crops, they were a part of the culture. Native Americans raised turkeys long before settlers came to South Carolina—and chickens arrived with the first settlers.

Vaejovis carolinianus - Southern Unstriped Scorpion.
Glen Peterson [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

The Southern Unstriped Scorpion is commonly found in the piedmont and mountains of the state. The Striped Scorpion seems to be moving north into the state, found in the coastal plain.

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Kevin Gray about teens increasing use of electronic-cigarettes. Dr. Gray is a Professor and Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at MUSC.

John Warner
Concepts to Companies

A weekly update of the entrepreneurial activity in South Carolina.

Mike Switzer interviews John Warner, co-founder of Accessible Diagnostics and the Swampfox Facebook page, based in Greenville, S.C.

Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.
Library of Congress

(Originally broadcast 02/23/18) - Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their citizenship, in hopes of changing things for the better at home.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I spoke with a young mother last week whose husband works for the US Forestry Department. He’s been sent out west to help fight the dangerous and extensive fires that are burning thousands of acres in that part of the country. In addition to the dangers that automatically come to mind, fire fighters are at risk for getting skin irritations from encountering poison ivy. More seriously, they may inhale smoke from burned plants which contains the urushiol compound which causes reactions in most people.

The Waltz

Aug 10, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

When the dance known as the waltz first became popular in Europe in the late 1700's and early 1800's, it was considered by many observers to be the ultimate in lewdness and licentiousness, a corrupter of youth.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Monck’s Corner (Berkeley County, 2010 population 7,755). The village of Monck’s Corner in St. John’s Berkeley Parish derived its name from Thomas Monck’s eighteenth century plantation. A small commercial community grew up near the plantation, located at a fork where the Charleston Road intersected with the Cherokee Path. During the siege of Charleston in 1780, it became a point of strategic importance and the scene of a major British victory. After the Revolution, the completion of the State Road and the Santee Canal caused the village to decline.

Trapdoor Spiders

Aug 10, 2018
Trapdoor Spider Fort Bragg, North Carolina, USA.
Patrick Randall [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

A Southern Trapdoor spider spotted in the Upstate, unusually, walking across a road.

Scott Garvin
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

Our state’s capital city has been experiencing something of a renaissance lately as its downtown area continues to play catch-up with Charleston and Greenville.  Our next guest has been right in the middle of this activity.

Mike Switzer interviews Scott Garvin, president of Garvin Design Group in Columbia, SC.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Many people have trouble telling poison ivy and Virginia creeper apart., Both are native vines in the cashew family, both are deciduous, have compound leaves and produce berries that are an important food for birds in the winter. Poison ivy, however, has three leaflets per leaf, leaves of three –- leave it be -- while Virginia creeper has five leaflets and is actually quite pretty and  planted frequently for beauty and erosion control.

The Clarinet

Aug 9, 2018
A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The clarinet was the last of the principal woodwind instruments to join the orchestra. The modern clarinet evolved from earlier forms in the early 1700's—later than the modern oboe, bassoon, and flute—and it wasn’t until late in the century that orchestral composers included the clarinet in their scores with any regularity.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Molloy, Robert [1906-1977]. Novelist, editor, critic. Malloy was born in Charleston, but at the age of twelve his family moved to Philadelphia. He began his literary career as a publisher’s reader, translator, and book reviewer. Eventually he became the literary editor of the New York Sun and began writing short stories that appeared in national magazines. In 1945 he published his first novel, Pride’s Way—an engaging social comedy of a large Charleston Catholic family.

As we move further into the 21st century, there are still some industries that struggle to attract a diverse population of employees.  One that may not surprise you is the golf business.  And that’s why our next guest’s organization was established and whose work is making an impact in the Carolinas.

A Roseate Sooonbill
Charles J Sharp [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

These birds, in no great numbers, are usually found on the coastal plain of South Carolina.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Recently   I noticed a red spot on my wrist which I attributed to an insect bite. Sadly, that was a misdiagnosis – turns out that in my summer mission to get unwanted vines and such out of established beds, I mistook a poison ivy vine for Virginia creeper and ended up with a bad outbreak on my arms. Both these native vines have hairy stems when mature and climbing on trees.

A Minute with Miles
SC Public Radio/Mary Noble Ours

The harpsichord, the keyboard workhorse of the Baroque period, is an instrument with a problem:  varying the touch on the keys has absolutely no effect on volume or tone quality.  Depress a key gently or pound on it, it doesn’t matter — the note will sound the same. 

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