Weather Alerts

There IS an end in sight. It’s just not anytime soon for those that need it the most.

Even though all tropical storm warnings have been cancelled, the persistent heavy rain and flash flooding from Tropical Storm Florence will continue for several more hours in portions of North and South Carolina.

The heavy rain and flood risk will then spread across the Mid-State of North Carolina and areas along and north of I-20 in South Carolina Saturday Night.  

Santee Cooper

Reports from Santee Cooper indicated that as of 3:30 p.m. Friday, some 38,900 Santee Cooper retail customers were without power due to early impacts from Hurricane Florence. Earlier in the afternoon outages peaked at 39,200, and crews were able to restore about 9,000 customers today before the outages increased again.

On the transmission side, three lines were locked out, impacting customers of Santee Cooper, Horry Electric Cooperative and Santee Electric Cooperative.

Florence: It's Now All About the Flooding

Sep 14, 2018

Hurricane Florence has slowed and is now crawling to the west at 6 mph. Life-threatening storm surge, inland flooding, and wind damage are imminent along the coast of North Carolina from Wilmington to the Outer Banks and stretching to northern portions of South Carolina through the day on Friday. Florence is forecast to move southwest along the coastline before turning to the northeast on Sunday.

As Hurricane Florence slams North Carolina, the riverfront city of New Bern is already feeling the impacts. Emergency crews are attempting to respond to more than a hundred calls for rescues.

Amber Parker, spokesperson for Craven County, North Carolina, tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson that officials are happy to have daylight on their side Friday.

Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, on Friday morning. The effects of the storm are being felt even further inland, with widespread reports of flooding.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with meteorologist Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp).

Many in the Charleston Area Shelter in Place for Florence

Sep 14, 2018
Charleston area gas station runs out of fuel
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Just hours before hurricane Florence slammed into North Carolina, Dallas Cone and his nearly 1 year-old daughter Hannah sat in the sand on Sullivan’s Island just outside of Charleston enjoying the cool breeze and growing waves.  He admitted his family was poised to leave, but changed their mind at the very last minute.

“We did board up yesterday expecting the worst,” he said.  “But I think it’s going to be north of us right now.”

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

More than 100 people were waiting to be rescued from homes and vehicles Friday morning in New Bern, N.C., after Hurricane Florence brought severe flooding to the area. Officials say more than 100 people have already been rescued in the area overnight.

Six swift water rescue teams have been working since Thursday afternoon to evacuate individuals and families, in some cases, from the roofs of their homes, the New Bern Public Information Officer Colleen Roberts said Friday afternoon.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET Saturday

Tropical Storm Florence is still a slow-moving giant that poses danger to people in North and South Carolina, as its storm surge and intense rains bring high floodwaters to towns both on the coast and inland.

The storm has been linked to at least five deaths, a toll that is expected to climb.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hurricane Florence is now only moving at 5 mph.  This will prolong the risks of life-threatening storm surge and wind damage, which are imminent along the coast of North Carolina from Wilmington to the Outer Banks.  

The first tornado warned cell associated with outer bands of Florence moved through portions of the Inner Banks of North Carolina just after 11 am, with two more following shortly thereafter. Tornadoes are still possible across eastern North Carolina through Friday, where a Tornado Watch is in effect until further notice.

South Carolina Braced for Hurricane Florence

Sep 13, 2018

The South Carolina Emergency Response Team continues to track Hurricane Florence and remains fully dedicated to preparing for the storm's potential impact on South Carolina. Forecasters say that Florence is currently a Category 2 hurricane with the capacity to bring record amounts of rain to South Carolina. The State Emergency Operations Center is fully operational, staffed by emergency personnel from various state agencies and emergency organizations. The SEOC will be operational 24 hours a day until further notice.

Updated at 10:35 p.m. ET

Storm surges of 9 to 13 feet and rainfall up to 40 inches: Those are two of the most dire warnings about Hurricane Florence's effect on parts of North and South Carolina. Thousands have heeded evacuation orders; others are hoping to cope with the storm in their homes or at local shelters.

Florence became a hurricane again Sunday morning, and is forecast to rapidly intensify into a major hurricane by Monday. The storm could be a dangerous, slow-moving and significant threat to South Carolina later this week.

In their 5 pm Sunday advisory, the National Hurricane Center said Hurricane Florence was located 720 miles southeast of Bermuda and had maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. According to Hurricane Specialist Eric Blake earlier Sunday, those wind speeds were likely to dramatically increase in the next 24 hours,

South Carolina Emergency Management Division logo
SCEMD

In coordination with local officials, Governor Nikki Haley on Sunday announced that evacuation orders have been lifted for all residents in Charleston, Dorchester, Berkeley and Colleton counties as of 10:00 AM. At the request of local officials, evacuation orders for zones in Beaufort, Georgetown, Horry and Jasper counties remain in effect as local law enforcement and officials continue to assess areas for potential dangers.

Satellite image from the NOAA Geostationary Satellite Survey, Wednesday afternoon, Oct 5. 2016.
NOAA/NWS

Track Hurricane Matthew and see its projected path, mapped with data from the National Hurricane Center.

John Keefe, Louise Ma and Steve Melendez / WNYC Data News Team. Follow us @datanews, email us here.

Interactive Evacuation Map for Hurricane Matthew

Oct 7, 2016

This interactive map from the South Carolina Department of Transportation will give you the latest information on routes and lane reversals.

Linda O'Bryon / SC Public Radio

Friday morning Governor Nikki Haley said it will soon be too late to evacuate.  During the 11 AM press conference, the Governor said 310,000 residents had already evacuated the coast. That was up from 280,000 yesterday.  She adds anyone who hasn't or can't move inland should find a shelter to wait out the storm.

Officials: Last Chance to Evacuate

Oct 7, 2016
Alexandra Olgin
Cathy Bradberry

Officials say now is your last chance to evacuate. Once the rain and wind gets bad they warn it won’t be safe to drive. North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey says authorities went to low lying areas that are prone to flooding and knocked on doors to encourage people to leave.

“We are going back today to again. We will have our city buses there to transport if they need it. You flood under a major rain we don’t know exactly how high your waters are going to get. But you need to be safe. We will get you back to your homes as quickly as possible.”

Helpline for Shelter Locations: 866-246-0133

Oct 7, 2016

Evacuees seeking refuge from Hurricane Matthew should call 1-866-246-0133 to be directed to the nearest open emergency shelter anywhere in the state. The state’s public information phone system is operational 24 hours a day until South Carolina is no longer in danger.

The S.C. Emergency Management Division website, scemd.org, lists emergency shelter status statewide and is updated in real-time by the S.C. Department of Social Services.

Coastal evacuees currently traveling or without internet access are urged to call the PIPS line if they need assistance.

S.C. PUBLIC INFORMATION PHONE SYSTEM

1-866-246-0133

For more information visit scemd.org or follow @SCEMD on Twitter and Facebook.

Gov. Niki Haley and response team, Thu, Oct 6, 2016.
Russ McKinney / SC Public Radio

Gov. Nikki Haley Announces Evacuation Of Additional Areas In Jasper and Colleton Counties, Zone B

Residents and visitors in Zone B of Jasper and Colleton Counties should begin evacuating effective immediately TODAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6.  This evacuation is in addition to the previous evacuation for the areas of Jasper and Colleton Counties in Zone A, which went into effect yesterday, October 5.

All South Carolina shellfish beds will be closed at 12:00 p.m. on Friday, October 7, 2016 in advance of Hurricane Matthew. This precautionary action is being taken because of the likelihood of the occurrence of heavy rainfall and storm water runoff as a result of the storm.

“All oyster, clam and mussel harvest areas will be closed on Friday at noon and remain closed until evaluated and re-opened by the Department,” said Mike Pearson, manager of DHEC’s Shellfish Sanitation Program. “Individual areas will be opened as soon as conditions are acceptable for the harvest of shellfish.”

Owners and operators of reservoirs in areas potentially impacted by rain and winds from Hurricane Matthew should check their dams and take appropriate steps to safely lower the water levels today and through the next several days in preparation for the storm, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Emergency Shelters Open

Oct 5, 2016

The South Carolina Response Team today announced the opening of shelters across the state for residents and visitors who are evacuating from coastal areas as Hurricane Matthew approaches. Shelters began opening on Wednesday, October 5, and as of 5 PM there are 32 shelters open.

Charleston County Hurricane Matthew Update

Oct 5, 2016

Charleston County Government announces the following shelters are now open:

  • North Charleston High School, 1087 E Montague Ave, North Charleston, SC 29405
  • Stall High School, 3625 Ashley Phosphate Rd, North Charleston, SC 29418
  • A.C. Corcoran Elementary, 8585 Vistavia Rd, North Charleston, SC 29406
  • Midland Park Primary, 2415 Midland Park Road, North Charleston, SC 29406
  • Ladson Elementary, 3321 Ladson Rd, Ladson, SC 29456
  • Edmund A. Burns Elementary, 3750 Dorchester Road, North Charleston, SC 29405 (Pet / Pet Owner Shelter)

Gov. Nikki Haley and other state officials during Tuesday press conference.
Thelisha Eaddy / SC Public Radio

As Hurricane Matthew threatens the southeastern United States, Governor Nikki Haley today ordered an evacuation of coastal areas in and around Charleston and Beaufort, South Carolina  

Residents and visitors in Charleston and Beaufort Counties should begin evacuating no later than 3:00 PM TODAY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5.  Residents and visitors in certain parts of bordering coastal counties – Berkeley, Colleton, Dorchester and Jasper Counties – should begin evacuating no later than 3:00 PM TODAY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5.

South Carolina Emergency Management Division logo
SCEMD

COLUMBIA, S.C. - Governor Nikki Haley today issued an executive order declaring a State of Emergency and asked residents to prepare for a potential evacuation of the South Carolina coast in advance of any impact from Hurricane Matthew.

As state officials continue to monitor weather conditions, the governor will update residents about preparations for Hurricane Matthew, including the need for an evacuation of coastal areas, during a news conference tomorrow, Wednesday, October 5, at 9:00 AM.

National Weather Service Alerts for South Carolina

Oct 2, 2015

A current lists of alerts for South Carolina from the National Weather Service.

South Carolina Prepares for Severe Flooding

Oct 2, 2015

COLUMBIA, S.C. (Friday, October 2, 2015, 11:50 a.m.) – At 12:00 p.m., the South Carolina Emergency Management Division increased the state’s operational condition to Level 3. OpCon3 means a disaster or emergency situation is likely in our state and that state agencies have been notified to staff positions at the State Emergency Operations Center in West Columbia. The SEOC is currently operating on a 24-hour schedule for the duration of the incident.

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