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Up First briefing: State of the economy; a possible Trump indictment; difficult bosses

It wasn't too long ago that a lot of experts were fearing a recession. It hasn't quite turned out that way – but that doesn't mean recession fears are over.
Getty Images
It wasn't too long ago that a lot of experts were fearing a recession. It hasn't quite turned out that way – but that doesn't mean recession fears are over.

Good morning. You're reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today's top stories

What is going on with the economy? If you're confused, you're not alone — I am too. Economic forecasters are now more optimistic that the Federal Reserve can get inflation under control and avoid a recession. But we're not out of the woods yet. The Fed is expected to raise interest rates again this week, and a job market downturn is still possible, which could mean more layoffs. These are some key signs to look out for regarding the health of the U.S. economy.

Former President Donald Trump is anticipating a third indictment — this time related to his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.

  • NPR's Carrie Johnson says on Up First that this indictment would, in some ways, be "the most serious criminal case against Trump." Charges could include conspiracy to defraud the U.S. and obstruction of Congress on Jan. 6. Johnson adds Trump made his legal problems "a centerpiece of his campaign," claiming he's been politically targeted.
  • As Trump waits for a decision on this potential indictment, he'll be preparing for the trial for the case related to his alleged mishandling of classified documents, set for May 20, 2024. Here's what to know about this case.
  • House Republicans have advanced a package of bills that could reduce health insurance costs. But the cheaper costs could also undermine protections for patients under the Affordable Care Act. The CHOICE Arrangement Act would allow self-employed people and businesses to band together to buy large group plans. The plans are less expensive because they don't have to meet ACA standards, like covering hospitalization, prescription drugs, and mental health care.

    Spanish residents woke up to an uncertain political future today. The weekend's national elections failed to produce a clear winner, as neither major party won enough support to form a government. Politicians must now wrangle a new deal, or a new vote will take place later this year.

  • Though the far-right Vox party didn't perform well, NPR's Miguel Macias reports that its "toxic" style, which tends to disregard facts, has "certainly changed the tone of political discourse in Spain.
  • Life advice

    One blue and one red wooden figurine leaning into each other under speech bubbles on white surface, purple background
    PM Images / Getty Images
    /
    Getty Images
    One blue and one red wooden figurine leaning into each other under speech bubbles on white surface, purple background

    It's the start of another work week, and many of you may be walking into an environment where you don't get along with your boss. Career coach Brandon Johnson recently helped a Life Kit listener navigate a boss that won't stop talking about politics at work. His advice can be applied to many workplace conflicts:

  • Control what you can, like how much direct contact you have with the difficult person.
  • Request a meeting to discuss healthy workplace boundaries.
  • Consider asking HR for help if the situation is impacting your work.
  • Try to move the relationship toward being more generative rather than negative.
  • I'm really into

    Trying to set up Ant-Man on my controller.
    / Jamal Michel
    /
    Jamal Michel
    Trying to set up Ant-Man on my controller.

    Even as an adult, former NPR intern Jamal Michel still finds value in his toys. He writes that toy photography allows him to tap into his inner child and examine unresolved traumas. His projects explore identity and Black representation while allowing him to hold on to the joys of youth.

    What are you really into? Fill out this form or leave us a voice note at 800-329-4273, and part of your submission may be featured online or on the radio.

    3 things to know before you go

    A trio of rabbits gather on a driveway, in Wilton Manors, Fla., earlier this month. About 100 lionhead rabbits have taken up residence in the suburban Fort Lauderdale community.
    Wilfredo Lee / AP
    /
    AP
    A trio of rabbits gather on a driveway, in Wilton Manors, Fla., earlier this month. About 100 lionhead rabbits have taken up residence in the suburban Fort Lauderdale community.

  • It's the cutest problem ever: Dozens of domesticated bunnies have overrun a community in Florida, prompting a nonprofit to come help catch and rehome them.
  • The Women's World Cup is underway, which means we'll see iconic shots of players victoriously throwing off their shirts to celebrate wins. This wouldn't be possible without the sports bra — a garment that has come a long way from its humble beginnings.
  • U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia thinks that nerds have the power to do great things. He was at Comic-Con this weekend to announce a congressional caucus focused on popular arts.
  • Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.