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Piccolo Spoleto Festival/City of Charleston

Spoleto Backstage: Piccolo Spoleto; 'Pay No Attention To The Girl'; 'Letter To A Friend In Gaza'

On this episode of Spoleto Backstage , we learn about this year's Piccolo Spoleto Festival from Scott Watson, director of the Office of Cultural Affairs for the city of Charleston, and violinist Yuriy Bekker, concertmaster for the Charleston Symphony Orchestra. Host Adam Parker speaks with stage director David Herskovitz about his innovative new play, "Pay No Attention to the Girl." And filmmaker Amos Gitai joins us with a preview of his multimedia performance "Letter to a Friend in Gaza."

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A Life Of Anxiety Documented

Aug 12, 2014

When photographer John William Keedy was first diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, he says he had a hard time coping. It was difficult to accept. It was difficult to explain to friends and family. He felt utterly alone.

"I hate to say it, but I was embarrassed by it," he tells Shots.

Reflecting unanimous agreement from a panel of experts, the World Health Organization said in a statement today that it is ethical to offer unproven drugs to treat or prevent the spread of the Ebola virus.

For all you teachers out there contemplating the August calendar with dismay, watching, powerless, as the days of summer vacation dwindle down to a precious few, I have some consolation to offer: a hilarious academic novel that'll send you laughing (albeit ruefully) back into the trenches of the classroom.

Comedian and actor Robin Williams says a woman once came up to him in an airport and said: "Be zany."

"Pardon?" he asked.

"Be zany," she insisted.

"It's that thing — they want you to be that thing," he told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in 2006. "And it's like, 'No.' Sometimes it's fun, and I'll play if the moment's right, if there's an opportunity. And if not, I'll talk straight with you."

Actor Robin Williams hanged himself in his California home Monday, police officials said today.

He was discovered by his personal assistant in Williams' bedroom, "unresponsive with a belt secured around his neck," according to Marin County Sheriff's Lt. Keith Boyd. (You can read his prepared statement here.)

From the aerospace sector to Silicon Valley, engineering has a retention problem: Close to 40 percent of women with engineering degrees either leave the profession or never enter the field.

Conventional wisdom says that women in engineering face obstacles such as the glass ceiling, a lack of self-confidence and a lack of mentors. But psychologists who delved deeper into the issue with a new study found that the biggest pushbacks female engineers receive come from the environments they work in.

If there's one thing Tiger Mothers have in common with those bringing up Bébé, it's that they both show us just how varied parenting styles can be.

Argentine parents let their kids stay up until all hours; Japanese parents let 7-year-olds ride the subway by themselves; and Danish parents leave their kids sleeping in a stroller on the curb while they go inside to shop or eat.

Citing safety concerns, police in Ferguson, the St. Louis suburb where an officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager Saturday, say they won't release the name of the officer who fired the shots. The department reportedly received threats against the officer.

"If we come out and say, 'it was this officer,' then he immediately becomes a target," Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson said, according to the AP. "We're taking the threats seriously."

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. A press release from the NBA says a California court has confirmed the authority of Shelly Sterling to sell the team.

Shelly Sterling had arranged to sell the franchise to Ballmer in May for $2 billion, but her husband, Donald Sterling, sued to block the deal.

When the Federal Communications Commission asked for public comments about the issue of keeping the Internet free and open, the response was huge.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Is your phone listening to you?

May 17, 2019

It's a spooky feeling: You're discussing a TV show or a pair of shoes or whatever with a friend, then you open Instagram and see an ad for the exact thing you were just talking about. But it's not like your phone is listening ... right? Plus: How delivery apps are changing the restaurant business and the legacy of Grumpy Cat.

Donald Trump says auto imports from Japan and the E.U. threaten the U.S.'s national security. SAT participants will now get an "adversity score," but they won't know what it is. Plus, we travel to Denmark, where top chefs are developing the foods of the future. Rollie pollies, anyone?

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

The age of fraud

May 17, 2019

Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio kicks off the special series "Brains and Losses," which looks at the financial vulnerability of an aging population. Then, more than 40 states are now suing Oxycontin maker Purdue.

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

Spoilers are good for you

May 17, 2019

From the BBC World Service... Facebook has banned an Israeli company it believes was behind hundreds of fake accounts, mostly targeting elections in six African countries. Then, we explain why climate change is a major issue in Australia's upcoming elections. Plus, do story spoilers necessarily spoil stories?

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

It's the final installment in our kickoff week of "How We Survive," an ongoing series about how technology can help us adapt to climate change. It's controversial to talk about using more money and technology to adapt versus efforts to mitigate, or slow down, global warming. Marketplace's Scott Tong tells us how he's seen the adaptation versus mitigation debate evolve in his years of reporting on climate change.

Today's show is sponsored by Clickshare and Indeed.

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