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South Carolina Public Radio News
  • In the past few weeks, South Carolina has set records for COVID-19 hospitalizations and new cases have approached peak levels of last winter. Classes, schools and entire districts have gone virtual, leaving parents frustrated and teachers quitting weeks into the school year. Republicans backed a provision to ban masks in schools in June when cases were low and have not budged. Now teachers, students and parents are struggling with the fallout as more young people contract the delta variant, forcing nearly two dozen schools and two entire districts back to online learning within a month of returning in person.
  • Some of the biggest names in South Carolina agriculture were on the guest list last Sunday evening in Saluda County, with Aiken-based Jason Tufts putting his culinary creativity into action as a participant in the South Carolina Chef Ambassadors program.Tufts, largely known for his work at downtown Aiken restaurant Malia's, was in gear in the Ward-Nicholson-Asbill House's kitchen, surrounded by thousands of acres of Titan Farms peach territory, with the assistance of fellow chefs Josh Cureton and Brandon Velie.The event, Dinner in the Orchard, featured creations from around South Carolina, starting with pecans and goat cheese and wrapping up, about an hour later, with local peaches (the last of the season), buttermilk ice cream and goat's milk caramel sauce.
  • Starting Monday, every student in South Carolina's second largest school district will have to wear a mask inside schools or have to go to online learning. Charleston County schools passed a mask rule in August, but was working to find a away around a South Carolina budget rule that state money can't be spent to enforce masks in schools. The district will use reserve money so state money from this budget year is not used.
  • A prominent South Carolina lawyer has surrendered to face insurance fraud and other charges in what's described as a failed plot to arrange his own death. Alex Murdaugh was issued a $20,000 bond and released Thursday on his own recognizance to return to drug rehab after the court hearing. State police say Murdaugh tried to arrange his death Sept. 4 so his surviving son could collect a $10 million life insurance policy. The State Law Enforcement Division has now been asked to open six investigations involving the Murdaugh family, including the unsolved killings of Murdaugh's wife and son — and the previous death of their housekeeper.
  • A brief tropical depression or named storm is still likely east of the North Carolina Outer Banks to start this upcoming weekend.
Latest SC Business Review Episodes
  • South Carolina Business Review
    SC Public Radio
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    After the recent announcement from the NCAA that college athletes can now profit from their celebrity status, Governor Henry McMaster signed the Name, Image and Likeness bill and it is scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 2022. Will this turn many of our college athletes into entrepreneurs?Mike Switzer interviews Bobby Robinson, an attorney with Nexsen Pruet in Charlotte, NC.
  • South Carolina Business Review
    SC Public Radio
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    For most of the last two decades, our next guest has been busy helping companies find locations for their factories and offices. What are companies looking for these days, has anything changed since the pandemic, and is our state a good business location state?Mike Switzer interviews Didi Caldwell, president and founding principal of Global Location Strategies in Greenville, SC. Their site selection app is site shepherd.
Latest NatureNotes Episodes
  • Some listeners find a skull at Lake Wateree State Park...
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    Richard Crook
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    Flickr
    Eumorpha fasciatus, the banded sphinx, is a moth of the family Sphingidae. The species was first described by Johann Heinrich Sulzer in 1776.
Latest SC Lede Episodes
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    SCETV
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    SCETV
    This episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 18, 2021, features: a report on families of disabled children and their concerns about an ACLU lawsuit against the state's mask mandate prohibition; a view from the medical frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic; updates about the monoclonal antibody shortage in the state; and more.
  • SC Lede Meg Kinnard Gavin Jackson Houston Texas September 2021.jpg
    Meg Kinnard
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    On this edition of the South Carolina Lede for September 14, 2021, we speak with State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman about school safety amid rising closings, quarantines, infections, and deaths from COVID-19. We're also joined by the Associated Press' Meg Kinnard with updates on her fight against breast cancer.
National News
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Arnold Genthe, 1869-1942
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Library of Congress
A part of our celebration of Walter Edgar's Journal at 21 we present an encore from 2014, with guest John Shelton Reed, talking about his book, Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s.In the years following World War I, the New Orleans French Quarter attracted artists and writers with low rent, a faded charm, and colorful street life. By the 1920s Jackson Square became the center of a vibrant but short-lived bohemia. A young William Faulkner and his roommate William Spratling, an artist who taught at Tulane, were among the "artful and crafty ones of the French Quarter." In Dixie Bohemia: A French Quarter Circle in the 1920s (LSU Press, 2012) John Shelton Reed introduces Faulkner's circle of friends ranging from the distinguished Sherwood Anderson to a gender-bending Mardi Gras costume designer and brings to life the people and places of New Orleans in the jazz age.
Latest SC Public Radio Newscasts
Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.

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Amanda McNulty of Clemson University’s Extension Service and host of ETV’s six-time Emmy Award-winning show, Making It Grow, offers gardening tips and techniques.Making It Grow Minutes are produced by South Carolina Public Radio, in partnership with Clemson University's Extension Service.
Doctors, medical professionals and researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina are featured on Health Focus. Award winning public broadcaster Bobbi Conner hosts this series of health and medical features, covering a wide array of topics. Health Focus is a production of the Medical University of South Carolina in partnership with South Carolina Public Radio.