Amanda McNulty

Host, Producer

Amanda McNulty is a Clemson University Extension Horticulture agent and the host of South Carolina ETV’s Making It Grow! gardening program. She studied horticulture at Clemson University as a non-traditional student. “I’m so fortunate that my early attempts at getting a degree got side tracked as I’m a lot better at getting dirty in the garden than practicing diplomacy!” McNulty also studied at South Carolina State University and earned a graduate degree in teaching there.

Ways to Connect

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. In parts of the state where cotton was grown, the fall of the year brought not only color in autumn leaves but also roadsides that were often white with cotton that blew out of the wagons that steadily traveled from the fields to the gins. Farmers had to frequently empty the cotton-picking machines into wire cotton wagons and transport them to the gin, where each one had to be logged in.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Team Making It Grow is working on a segment about the new technology of up-to-date cotton gins. Once a place where accidents were frequent, the new gins are run by computers with minimal human interaction except for constant supervision. We’re trying to film the cotton being harvested in the fields for this video, but the weather won’t cooperate.

Cotton Modules

Nov 19, 2018

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Calhoun County, where I live, has a strong agricultural base. In the Fort Motte area, bordering the Congaree River, farmers know how to manage their clay containing soils to produce outstanding crops. Right now, these growers are waiting for the rains to stop and for sunny days to return so they can finish picking this year’s cotton crop. The unpicked fields are beautiful with white fluffy bolls tightly held on the leafless plants.

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of “Making It Grow” Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Paul Thompson about pruning.

MIG Extra 20

Clemson Extension and Making It Grow Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Paul Thompson about vines. Part 3 (Yellow Jessamine, Clematis, Smilax).

MIG Extra 19

Clemson Extension and Making It Grow Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Paul Thompson about vines. Part 2 (Wisterias, Honeysuckles).

MIG Extra 18

CClemson Extension and Making It Grow Amanda McNulty talks with fellow agent Paul Thompson about vines.  Part 1 (Bignonia, Trumpet Vine, Virginia Creeper).

MIG Extra 17

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Sumter County Hort Agent Chase Smoak grew up roaming the woodlands near his family farm in Pinewood, learning the native trees and perennials found there. He drew upon that knowledge in a recent fact sheet he wrote for Clemson’s Home and Garden Information Center on Black Gum, Nyssa sylvatica, also called tupelo gum.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Chalk maple, Acer leucoderme, is a smaller maple native to the south east which has chalky white bark and is known for consistent good fall color. This is a smaller tree, about 25 feet tall, and is usually multi-trunked unless pruned to a central leader. The leaves tend to hang on in winter which can make for a shaggy appearance.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Trips to New England in the fall must be delightful – you get to wear a sweater in September, lobsters are plentiful and inexpensive, the woodlands are ablaze with color. The sugar maples that are native to that part of the word, Acer saccharum, not only give us maple syrup but reliably develop the red anthocyanin pigments as the rainfall and temperatures in those northern areas are usually just right for that process to occur.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The red maples that thrive in the flood plains of the Congaree and Wateree Rivers are actually more striking in January and February than in the fall of the year. Their flowers and fruits that follow, those seed containing samaras, are often bright red or sometimes a deep burgundy and they are the earliest trees to show any color in the spring.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Last week we got out the wool blankets, fortunately I haven’t seen any new holes since I packed them carefully with moth balls at the end of last winter. One of the delights of cooler temperatures besides snuggling under the cover is the colors that we see in nature. As I drive across the Congaree River floodplain, some of the deciduous trees, including the bald cypress, are beginning to show color.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The farm workers who harvest produce are an important part of making sure that the fruits and vegetables we enjoy are free from contamination. The new federal Food Safety Modernization Act makes worker training and compliance, be they hired laborers or family members, a part of the requirements that covered farms must implement.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The produce safety rules portion of the Food and Drug Administrations’ new Food Safety Modernization act are based on common sense. Some of the rules cover testing water used for irrigation and a higher standard for the water used for worker hygiene, washing produce, and making ice.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Many farmers rolled their eyes when they heard about new requirements from the US Food and Drug Administration’s Food Safety Modernization Act. However, only farms that grow fruits and vegetables that are usually consumed raw are covered by the produce safety portion of the law and there are many exceptions to that category based on annual sales at the farms and where the products are going.

Curbing Food Recalls

Oct 24, 2018

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The South Carolina Department of Agriculture’s Consumer Protection Division has a new responsibility these days. The US Food and Drug Administration has adopted a Food Safety Modernization Act which reflects a more proactive rather than reactive approach towards food safety for both humans and animals.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Recently Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery and I sat down and made recordings about soils, pollinator plants and more. If you go to "On-Demand Listening" at southcarolinapublicradio .org  you’ll find a plethora of podcasts to keep your mind occupied while  weeding the garden or cleaning out your tool shed. There are two options for listening to us if you click on Making It Grow.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The University of Florida Extension factsheet on trees and hurricanes speaks to the issue of properly planting a tree to improve its survivability. We Clemson people say not to amend the planting hole for several reasons -- one being that it can discourage the tree from sending roots into the less hospitable native soil.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The University of Florida’s Extension Service factsheet on trees that do and don’t hold up without serious damage in hurricanes has a suggestion that would make our urban forests

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of  Making It Grow is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how pollinating insects not only need food and host plants during the growing season, they also need a source of nutrients to get them through the winter.

MIG Extra 16

Live Oaks and Wind

Oct 3, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The University of Florida Extension Service has a factsheet titled How to Minimize Wind Damage in the South Florida Landscape. We here in South Carolina who observe the trees that grow near the coast know that live oaks -- hundreds of years old -- still stand in places where hurricanes frequently make landfall.

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how plants are capable of mulching themselves once established. However, providing mulch during their establishment period is critical.

MIG Extra 15

Davis Sanders
Sean Flynn/SCETV

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how retail nurseries are in the business of providing products for consumers and how their job is to satisfy the customers' wants while also educating them as to what they need and why.

MIG Extra 14

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how plant nutrition involves much more than providing nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Minor and micro nutrients and biological additives are equally important.

MIG Extra 13

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty and host of Making It Grow  is joined by Davis Sanders from South Pleasantburg Nursery in Greenville, SC. This chat is about how soil ecosystems are as important to plant nutrition as the nutrients themselves. Proper enhancements of the soil can actually reduce the need for additional fertilizers and nutrients.

MIG Extra 12

Persimmons

Sep 29, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Although persimmons have consistently beautiful and early fall foliage, they aren’t often highly valued by homeowners, but people who plant them as a food source for wildlife and soil stabilization know their importance. The ripe fruits are relished by deer, possums, foxes, and raccoons and people – although you have to wait until they’re so soft you can only eat them with a spoon or they’ll turn your mouth inside out.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Some people fuss about our native catalpas – both species grow here bignoniodes and speciosa – saying they are weedy and then go right and plant a horrible invasive non-native tree that closely resembles catalpa. Paulownia tomentosa, Princess Tree, has similar large heart shaped leaves and a showy cluster of flowers, purple in this case.

Catalpa "Worms"

Sep 27, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  A nearby stand of catalpa trees is kept pruned so that the owners can easily reach catalpa sphinx moth caterpillars that use the leaves as their larval food source. This stout but dully colored caterpillar is actually hard to find – most stands of catalpa I see don’t have them feeding on them. Their infestations seem to be sporadic; many other insects parasitize these creatures and some people actually purchase pupae to inoculate their trees.

The Fisherman's Tree

Sep 26, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Since summer seems interminable this year, I’m desperate for signs of fall. Several catalpa trees on my daily drive have caught my eye recently with their large leaves sporting a yellow autumnal color. Catalpa is known as a fisherman’s tree since it the larval food source for the catalpa sphinx moth. It has large, ten inches or so across, heart-shaped leaves that are yellow-green.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clemson’s Home and Garden Information Center has a dandy fact sheet called Planning, p-l-a-n-n-i-n-g, a garden. You still have time to put out hardier winter vegetables like kale, collards, and turnips. Extension Agent Tony Melton and I have recorded podcasts about how to get a successful garden up and going and you can find those along with all sorts of other cool things to listen to.

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