© 2022 South Carolina Public Radio
Radio Website Header-Waves 6 3.0.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
WEPR-FM, 90.1, Greenville/Spartanburg, will be operating at low power during tower maintenance. The transmitter may also be taken off the air periodically. Streaming is not affected.

Meg Kinnard/Associated Press

  • Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is headlining a major gathering of Republicans in South Carolina as he considers a 2024 White House bid. Congressman Jeff Duncan tells The Associated Press that Pompeo will speak Aug. 22 at the Faith & Freedom BBQ in Anderson. The Duncan campaign fundraiser has long been a showcase for possible White House contenders, including South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem. Pompeo has been testing the political waters of South Carolina, home to the first presidential votes in the South. Other possible contenders, including former Vice President Mike Pence, have been making appearances in the state throughout this summer.
  • Joe Cunningham has chosen a civil litigator who flew combat missions in Iraq to be his running mate. Cunningham is trying to become South Carolina's first Democratic governor in 20 years. He previewed his pick of Tally Parham Casey ahead of a formal announcement Monday in her hometown of Greenville. Cunningham told The Associated Press that Casey's military service, legal savvy and the fact that she's a woman make her the right fit. Casey was South Carolina's first female fighter pilot, serving three combat tours over Iraq, and has been an attorney for more than two decades. Gov. Henry McMaster and Lt. Gov. Pamela Evette filed for reelection last week.
  • Gov. Henry McMaster and Lt. Gov. Pamela Evette made history on Wednesday as the first gubernatorial ticket to file for reelection in South Carolina. Evette signed her paperwork with state officials in Columbia. As he sought his first full term in 2018, McMaster became the first governor to run on the same ticket as his pick for lieutenant governor. At the time, Evette was a political newcomer. McMaster said he picked the Greenville businesswoman in part due to her "fresh eyes" when it came to governing, as well as her relationships with the business community.
  • The U.S. Senate on Tuesday confirmed the nomination of South Carolina jurist Michelle Childs — recently under consideration for a slot on the U.S. Supreme Court — to sit on the federal court typically seen as a proving ground for the nation’s highest bench.
  • Attorneys for Sen. Lindsey Graham say he wasn't trying to interfere in Georgia's 2020 election when he called state officials to ask them to reexamine certain absentee ballots after President Donald Trump's narrow loss to Democrat Joe Biden. The arguments came in a court filing Tuesday as Graham challenges a subpoena compelling him to testify before a special grand jury in Georgia that's investigating Trump and his allies' actions after the 2020 election. Graham was one of a handful of Trump confidants and lawyers named in petitions filed last week by Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis.
  • State Rep. Krystle Matthews has won the Democratic nomination to challenge Republican U.S. Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina. Matthews was the second-place finisher in a June 14 primary and defeated author and preservationist Catherine Fleming Bruce in Tuesday's runoff. Matthews said she wants to change a toxic culture she says leads senators and others in power to strip away the rights of minorities and those who are in the most need of protection. Scott has been one of South Carolina's more popular politicians. The Senate's sole Black Republican had no primary opposition and has said this will be his last term if he is reelected.
  • Two days after losing a bitter primary to a rival she once deemed a "sellout" for occasionally working with Democrats, Katie Arrington appeared at a "unity rally" to urge South Carolina Republicans to come together and back Rep. Nancy Mace in the fall general election. Republicans, Arrington said, "may fight like banshees inside the house, but once we walk out that door, it's one team, one fight." The cordial tone is striking in a Republican Party increasingly defined by an absolutist approach to politics. Aware that the coastal congressional district is one of the few places in the state where Democrats have been competitive, Republicans say it is important to move past the party's internal divisions.
  • The third-place finisher in the GOP primary for South Carolina's top education job has endorsed school choice advocate Ellen Weaver, aiming to give the think tank CEO a boost in the Republican runoff.
  • Two Republican U.S. House incumbents in South Carolina who have drawn the ire of former President Donald Trump now find themselves facing tough primary challenges on Tuesday from candidates he has endorsed.
  • South Carolina's Democratic gubernatorial primary has begun to head up in its final week. On Tuesday, one of the candidates, state Sen. Mia McLeod, castigated the chamber's minority leader on Twitter just hours after he endorsed one of her opponents. McLeod said House Minority Leader Todd Rutherford had backed Joe Cunningham, and not her, because McLeod had refused "to appoint his unqualified new wife" as a magistrate. Rutherford told The Associated Press he was frustrated by McLeod's absence from Black Caucus meetings and what he characterized as "no care and concern over Black women, over Democrats, over people in particular." McLeod's campaign didn't immediately return an email message seeking comment. South Carolina's primary is June 14.