Hurricane Warnings continue; Dorian effects increasing later tonight

Sep 4, 2019

Updated 1:20 pm Wednesday:  Maximum sustained winds are still at 105mph, but Dorian could flucuate in intensity over the Gulf Stream. The latest measurement of minimum central pressure is still at 963 mb and the storm is moving NNW at 9 mph, according to the Tuesday 11 am update from the National Hurricane Center.

WATCHES AND WARNINGS

HURRICANE WARNING in effect for Beaufort, Berkeley, Georgetown and Horry counties.

TROPICAL STORM WARNING in effect for inland Marlboro Dillon and Marion Counties in the north, south to Orangeburg, Bamburg, and Hampton Counties.

STORM SURGE WARNING in effect for 3-5ft for the entire coastline.

FLASH FLOOD WATCH: Beaufort, Charleston, Coastal Colleton, Coastal Jasper, Dorchester, Inland Berkeley, Inland Colleton,
Inland Jasper, and Tidal Berkeley.

  • Rainfall amounts of 8 - 10 inches are expected with locally higher amounts to 15 inches possible, especially in urban coastal areas of SC, like downtown Charleston

FLOOD WARNING is in effect for Northeast Cape Fear Near Burgaw.
 

FORECAST UPDATE

Hurricane Dorian, still a category 2 storm, is now heading NNW at 9 mph. Dorian is still forecast to parallel the eastern coast of Florida as it continues to gain latitude. Minimal pressure still sits at 963 mb, and the winds are sustained at 105 mph. The continually growing eye and expanding hurricane and tropical-storm-force winds are due to the gradual weakening of Dorian. Some reorganization is expected as it tracks through warm, uninterrupted waters of the Atlantic, however high vertical wind shear should weaken any gains in wind speed and expand the area of the storm as it approaches the Carolinas. Dorian is expected to collide with a trough as it approaches the Carolinas, and this will likely enhance rain on the western side of the storm. Coastal areas of South Carolina could receive 8-10 inches of rain, with 2-5 inches possible west of the I-95 corridor. 

Update 6:45 AM Wednesday: Dorian remains a category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph. Hurricane Warnings are in effect for the entire South Carolina coast. Tropical Storm Warnings are in effect for most inland areas, including Walterboro, Sumter, Darlington, and Florence.

Tropical storm force winds are likely to arrive in the Hilton Head to Charleston areas on Wednesday evening. They are expected to spread northward to Georgetown and Myrtle Beach during the wee-hours of Thursday morning. The worst of the weather conditions are forecast along the coast on Thursday, gradually diminishing late Thursday night and coming to an end on Friday.

Surge 4 to 8 feet is likely near the coastal areas, along with heavy rain of 5 to 10 inches, depending on the exact track of Dorian. Isolated amounts to 15 inches are possible.

Update 11:25 AM Tuesday: Dorian is now a category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. The National Hurricane Center has issued Hurricane Warnings from north of Edisto Beach to South Santee River, South Carolina. The warning includes Charleston. A Hurricane Watch is in effect from north of the South Santee River to Duck, North Carolina, which includes Myrtle Beach. A Hurricane Watch is also in effect from Edisto Beach southward to Ponte Vedra, Florida, including Hilton Head.

Tropical storm force winds are likely to arrive in the Hilton Head to Charleston areas on Wednesday evening. They are expected to spread northward to Georgetown and Myrtle Beach during the wee-hours of Thursday morning. The worst of the weather conditions are forecast along the coast on Thursday, gradually diminishing late Thursday night and coming to an end on Friday.

Hurricane Watches continue south of the South Santee River to the state line with Georgia. Tropical Storm Watches are in effect for inland areas like Walterboro and Summerville. Surge 4 to 7 feet are possible near the coastal areas, along with heavy rain of 5 to 10 inches, depending on the exact track of Dorian. Isolated amounts to 15 inches are possible.

Update 7:30 AM Tuesday: Dorian is now a category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 45 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 160 miles.

Tropical storm force winds are likely to arrive in the Hilton Head to Charleston areas on Wednesday evening. They are expected to spread northward to Georgetown and Myrtle Beach during the wee-hours of Thursday morning. The worst of the weather conditions are forecast along the coast on Thursday, gradually diminishing late Thursday night and coming to an end on Friday.

Hurricane Watches continue south of the South Santee River to the state line with Georgia. Tropical Storm Watches are in effect for inland areas like Walterboro and Summerville. Surge 4 to 7 feet are possible near the coastal areas, along with heavy rain of 5 to 10 inches, depending on the exact track of Dorian.

Update 11:30 AM: Hurricane Dorian has top sustained winds of 155 mph, making it a category 4 hurricane as of the 11 am advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The forecast track has not changed from the morning update from the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Dorian remains an extremely powerful category 5 hurricane this morning. Based on satellite imagery, it has stalled over Grand Bahama Island and is the strongest storm on record there according to the National Hurricane Center.

Dorian is forecast to begin moving slowly northward, near or just offshore the Florida Atlantic coast on Tuesday. Forecasters say on the storm’s current path, tropical storm force winds are most likely near Hilton Head and Beaufort some time Wednesday morning. Storm force winds should reach Charleston late Wednesday afternoon and spread northward to the Grand Strand region Wednesday night.

The core of Hurricane Dorian is likely to stay just offshore, but the eastern half of South Carolina remains in the cone. For this reason, it is still possible the storm could make a westward jog onshore. At the point of closest approach, Dorian is likely to be a category 2 or 3 storm, but forecasters warn this will not make the storm any less dangerous.

Rainfall amounts of 5 to 10 inches, with local amounts to 15 inches are possible Wednesday and Thursday. Storm surge flooding is likely near the coast, but the exact track will determine how high the surge will be.

Conditions are likely to improve Thursday night in the Palmetto State as the hurricane moves toward the northeast.