Sunday Puzzle: Shuffle A Couple Letters For This Category Challenge

Mar 31, 2019

On-air challenge:

I'm going to give you two words. Change one letter in the first word to name a category of things. And change one letter in the second word to name something in that category.

Example: Inject Wash --> INSECT, WASP

1. Foal Thicken

2. Blower Phony

3. Ration Fiance

4. Allow Bronte

5. Wright Dunce

6. Maternal Pylon

Last week's challenge: Last week's challenge came from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. Think of a well-known brand name in 8 letters starting with H. Change the H to an M and drop the last letter. You'll get another well-known brand name in 7 letters. What commercial names are these?

Challenge answer: Heineken --> Meineke

Winner: Richard Bauman of Golden, Colo.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Joe Krozel of Creve Coeur, Mo. Name something you see when going to the movies, in two words. Change the sixth letter to an R, and you'll get something you might buy at a grocery, in three words. What things are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday April 4, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster.

Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, what was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. I said, think of a well-known brand name in eight letters starting with H. Change the H to an M, and drop the last letter. You'll get another well-known brand name in seven letters. What commercial names are these? And the answer is Heineken and Meineke.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received more than 1,320 responses, and our winner this week is Richard Bauman of Golden, Colo.

Congratulations.

RICHARD BAUMAN: Why, thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So tell me how you solved it.

BAUMAN: I actually - I didn't. My wife came up with Heineken and asked me whether Meineke was a brand name. And I said, of course, it is.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) So you guys kind of did it together.

BAUMAN: Yeah.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's great. I know we reached out to your wife to see if she wanted to come on. But, apparently, she said that she was OK with you playing the puzzle, so there will be marital bliss in the evening.

BAUMAN: (Laughter) Yes, she gets the pin.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: She gets the pin, all right. That's the deal that you came up with. All right, fair enough. And how long have you been playing The Puzzle?

BAUMAN: Oh, we've been playing for a long, long time - back in the postcard days.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, are you ready?

BAUMAN: Yeah, I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK, great. Take it away, Will.

SHORTZ: All right. Richard, I'm going to give you two words. Change one letter in the first word to name a category of things. And change one letter in the second word to name something in that category. For example, if I said inject and wash - W-A-S-H - you would say insect and wasp - one letter in each word. And here's number one - foal - F-O-A-L - and thicken - T-H-I-C-K-E-N.

BAUMAN: Foal and sticken (ph).

SHORTZ: So the first word is F-O-A-L as in the foal of a horse.

BAUMAN: F-O-A-L.

SHORTZ: And thicken. Change the first letter of thicken, what do you get?

BAUMAN: Chicken.

SHORTZ: Yeah. And what's that an example of?

BAUMAN: Fowl. Fowl and...

SHORTZ: Fowl and chicken. Good job. Number two, blower - B-L-O-W-E-R - and phony - P-H-O-N-Y.

BAUMAN: Blower and phony.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

BAUMAN: Flower and peony.

SHORTZ: Oh, that's fast.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: My favorite flower.

SHORTZ: Nice - ration - R-A-T-I-O-N - and fiance - F-I-A-N-C-E.

BAUMAN: Ration - R-A-T-I-O-N.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

BAUMAN: And fiance.

SHORTZ: Change the second letter of fiance.

BAUMAN: France.

SHORTZ: Yes.

BAUMAN: Nation - France and nation.

SHORTZ: That is it. Allow - A-L-L-O-W - and Bronte as in Charlotte - B-R-O-N-T-E.

BAUMAN: Allow and Bronte. Can you help me, Lulu?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You have the different ages when human civilization first started. So you have the...

BAUMAN: Oh.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Iron Age, and then you have another one.

BAUMAN: Bronze.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. What's that an...

BAUMAN: And alloy.

SHORTZ: And alloy is right. How about wright - W-R-I-G-H-T - and dunce - D-U-N-C-E?

BAUMAN: Wright and dunce - maybe bright.

SHORTZ: Yeah. Try changing the R of wright.

BAUMAN: Weight.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

BAUMAN: And ounce.

SHORTZ: That's it. And here's your last one - maternal - M-A-T-E-R-N-A-L - and pylon - P-Y-L-O-N.

BAUMAN: Maternal and pylon. Nylon - material and nylon.

SHORTZ: There you go. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Bring it in strong at the end. How do you feel?

BAUMAN: (Laughter) I feel great.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Great. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin - or rather, your wife will - as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Richard, which member station do you listen to?

BAUMAN: Well, we're members of Colorado Public Radio. And we listen to KCFR, KUNC and KUVO.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Richard Bauman of Golden, Colo., thank you for playing The Puzzle.

BAUMAN: Well, thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, what's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it comes from listener Joe Krozel of Creve Coeur, Mo. Name something you see when going to the movies in two words. Change the sixth letter to an R, and you'll get something you might buy at a grocery in three words. What things are these? So, again, something you see when going to the movies - two words. Change the sixth letter to an R, and you'll get something you might buy at a grocery in three words. What things are these?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle. And click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember; just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, April 4 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.