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Growing up in Baton Rouge, fashion designer Christopher John Rogers attended church with his grandma on Sundays. "There was a big emphasis on head-to-toe monochromatic dressing," Rogers says. "So, if the jacket [was] red the skirt was red, the bag was red, the hat was red — or green, or violet, or marigold. That sense of color and the taking up of space with hue really inspired me."

It is not a secret that the Academy Awards have historically struggled with gender diversity. Though generally critics point to the lack of women nominated in major categories like best director, a critical part of the ceremony itself has also traditionally overlooked women: the Oscars' 42-piece orchestra.

The Relaunch Of XFL

Feb 8, 2020

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The National Portrait Gallery unveiled its official portraits of Michelle and Barack Obama nearly two years ago. Since then, the gallery reports that attendance has nearly doubled.

Next summer, the portraits will hit the road to reach an even wider audience.

In Washington, D.C., dozens of people line up behind velvet ropes every day to admire artist Kehinde Wiley's interpretation of the former president. It features Obama sitting at the edge of a wooden chair, surrounded by lush foliage. Pink and white flowers are dispersed across the canvas.

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The new movie "Birds Of Prey: And The Fantabulous Emancipation Of One Harley Quinn" begins with a breakup.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BIRDS OF PREY: AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN")

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"There are so many ways to get this right, they had to look for a way to get this wrong."

That's author L.L. McKinney's response to Barnes & Noble's "Diverse Editions" campaign. McKinney's most recent book, A Dream So Dark, is a sequel to A Blade So Black, a contemporary retelling of Alice in Wonderland with a black female lead.

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Could the Iowa caucuses be done for? After this week of confusion and muddled results, journalist and comedian Mo Rocca says yes. He has this remembrance.

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In 2016, Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton in Wisconsin by fewer than 23,000 votes. This time, a group that favors Trump is trying to ensure a repeat victory. And it's using something called geofencing to find churchgoing Catholics. For All Tech Considered, I spoke with Heidi Schlumpf of the National Catholic Reporter about what's going on.

Wisteria Island, created by the U.S. Navy nearly a century ago, has been left untouched for decades, except by boaters and campers who make their homes there. It's a valuable piece of real estate that's now at the center of a court battle between a developer and the federal government who both say they own it.

Kirk Douglas, the self-described "ragman's son" who became a global Hollywood superstar in the 1950s and '60s, died on Wednesday. He was 103. Douglas was often cast as a troubled tough guy in films, most famously as a rebellious Roman slave named Spartacus. Off-screen, he was devoted to family and to humanitarian causes.

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