The World

News & Music Stations: Mon - Fri, 3 - 4 pm | News & Talk Stations: 8 - 9 pm
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

The World brings international stories home to America. Each weekday, host Marco Werman guides listeners through major issues and stories, linking global events directly to the American agenda.

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There were many reasons to leave.

Wajed al-Khalifa talks about what happened to her brother in Homs, Syria’s third-largest city. He was pulled over at a military checkpoint, accused of being an anti-government activist, she says. He was tortured and nearly killed.

Her husband, Gasem al-Hamad also has his reasons — what happened to his brothers. One was killed by a barrel bomb, a crude unguided weapon filled with explosives that fell in his neighborhood. Another brother went missing.

Monica Campbell

No more Syrian refugees. That’s what US President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration makes sure of by blocking, at least temporarily, this group from entering the US. Hours after the news came, lives changed, including the life of one Syrian refugee family I have kept up with since they were resettled in Turlock, California, about two hours east of San Francisco.

The United Nations is condemning itself over its handling of the crisis involving Myanmar's Rohingya minority. Over the past decade, nearly 1 million Rohingya have escaped violence and persecution in Myanmar. The mass exodus attracted worldwide attention and criticism over the UN's role.

When Egyptians poured into the streets of Cairo back in 2011, Hend Nafie was excited.

"I was hoping for personal freedom," she said. "I wanted to be free. I wanted my family to accept me [as] who I am."

Nafie grew up in a conservative family in a village in the Nile Delta. She says her family was strict. Her parents didn’t want her to go to school or make any decisions for herself.

"So, when I participated in the revolution, it was the first time that I feel like I did something I really wanted," she said.

Thousands of women walk off jobs in Switzerland

Jun 14, 2019

Thousands of women across Switzerland held a strike Friday to highlight their nation's poor record on women’s rights. The wealthy country, surrounded by other progressive countries, has long been lacking in women's rights.

Hongkongers wield ‘people power’ to protest extradition to mainland

Jun 14, 2019

Hundreds of thousands took to the streets of Hong Kong this week to protest an extradition bill. The bill, which will cover Hong Kong residents and foreign and Chinese nationals living or traveling in the city, has many concerned that it may threaten the rule of law that supports Hong Kong's international financial status, as well as its legal system.

It’s after sundown, but the woman in a video on Twitter is still wearing a sun hat as she shouts at Hong Kong police officers. 

Holding up a mobile phone in front of her, she asks the cops if they want to send her back to China. When one of them offers her a snack because she may be tired. She refuses. 

“I don’t take things from running dogs,” the woman says. 

Amsterdam, famed for its picturesque canals, Anne Frank museum and Vincent Van Gogh art collection, is facing a challenge many cities can only dream of.

The Dutch capital, with its tolerant attitude to drugs and prostitution, is such a tourist draw that the city is now openly encouraging visitors to go elsewhere.

Sridhar Anandakrishnan and three colleagues watched from an expanse of ice as two prop planes flew off into the blue Antarctic sky on a peaceful day in January. After the planes faded from view, Anandakrishnan, a second scientist and two mountaineers became some of the most isolated humans on Earth.

The planes wouldn’t be back for 10 days.

I started getting into photography when I was 18 and bought my first camera with money I earned waiting tables in a restaurant in Sari, in northern Iran.

After decades in the shadows, Russia's feminists grab their spotlight

Jun 5, 2019

Russian feminists paraded a 13-foot-tall model vagina down the streets of St. Petersburg on May 1, 2018, without getting arrested. It was a big win.

“[Police] arrested only those who they have orders to arrest,” says Leda Garina, director of the Eve's Ribs, a social, artistic, documentary and communication project devoted to the subject of gender discrimination. “But there were no vagina orders, so they didn’t know how to react.”

Australian Federal Police executed a raid at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) offices to search thousands of documents relating to investigative stories that ABC reported in 2017 regarding alleged misconduct of Australian troops in Afghanistan. Authorities say the material was classified, and their search warrant covered thousands of documents, emails, raw footage and broadcast scripts relating to the stories. 

Russia's youth flex their political power

Jun 4, 2019

Is Russia "United” or looking to the “Future?”

For President Vladimir Putin, who leads the “United Russia” party and opposition leader Alexei Navalny, founder of “Russia of the Future,” it's an important question. It's also one the world is increasingly looking toward young people to answer.  

Arina Malinofskaya spends her weekends at animal shelters across Moscow helping dogs and cats get adopted. On a sunny May Saturday, Malinofskaya is in charge of volunteers at the 10th annual WOOF fest, a yearly adoption event run by the NIKA Charitable Foundation.

Toronto fans are going nuts. Their basketball team, the Toronto Raptors, is going to the NBA finals for the first time in the franchise's history.

Superfan Nav Bhatia is even more excited than most. If you've ever watched a Raptors game on TV, you've seen Bhatia courtside, in his characteristic Sikh turban and jersey.

Twitter found out about Bhatia over the past weekend in a viral thread: 

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