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SC Features

  • “T” is for Taylor, John (1770-1832). Congressman, governor, U.S. senator. Born near Granby, Taylor graduated from Princeton in 1788. Later he read law in Charleston and established a practice in Columbia. In 1793 he was elected to the first of six terms in the South Carolina House of Representatives. Taylor later served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1807-1810) and the U.S. Senate (1810-1816). A Democratic-Republican, he became a key player in congressional efforts to make economic sanctions an effective deterrent against British and French violations of American neutral trading rights. From 1818-1825 he was a member of the state senate and in 1826 elected governor. As governor, John Taylor used his position to rally opposition against Congress, whose continued sanctions of protective tariffs and internal improvements he denounced as unconstitutional and inequitable.
  • A forest tent caterpillar
    Brian Adams [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]
    /
    Flickr
    This is one of two species of tent caterpillars found in South Carolina.
  • Spring wildflowers blossom early, while they have access to full sun.
  • Spring wildflowers blossom early, while they have access to full sun.
  • “S” is for St. James Goose Creek Parish. A long rectangle extending northwestward from the Cooper River through modern Charleston, Berkeley, and Orangeburg Counties, St. James Goose Creek was one of the ten original parishes created by the Church Act of 1706. By 1672 a group of settlers from Barbados had settled with their enslaved property on Goose Creek, a meandering tributary of the Cooper River. The “Goose Creek Men” were experienced colonists and accomplished planters and they quickly came to dominate the colony both politically and economically. Colonial Goose Creek was the most prosperous and populous community outside Charleston, attributes that are reflected in its ornate parish church that was completed in 1719. With the abolition of the parish system in 1865, St. James Goose Creek Parish became a part of Berkeley County.
  • Theater careers are often incubated in children, either by an interest in TV shows or movies, but also sometimes by in-person town theaters. Founded in 2005, our next guest’s children’s theater is our state’s only professional resident theater for young audiences, i.e. professional adult actors performing for children and families.Mike Switzer interviews Jerry Stevenson, co-founder and artistic director of Columbia Children's Theatre in Columbia, SC.
  • This moth has a large cocoon that is attached to surfaces along its long side.
  • Theater careers are often incubated in children, either by an interest in TV shows or movies, but also sometimes by in-person town theaters. Founded in 2005, our next guest’s children’s theater is our state’s only professional resident theater for young audiences, i.e. professional adult actors performing for children and families.Mike Switzer interviews Jerry Stevenson, co-founder and artistic director of Columbia Children's Theatre in Columbia, SC.
  • “R” is for Rash, Ron (b. 1953). Poet, novelist. A native of Chester, Rash graduated from Gardner-Webb College and received an M.A. in English from Clemson. Since 2003, he has been the Parris Distinguished Professor in Appalachian Cultural Studies at Western Carolina University. Rash’s family has lived in the southern Appalachian Mountains since the 1700s. His fiction and poetry about the people of Appalachia and the mill towns are filled with gentle humor, family strife, and economic problems. Although the people in his work are beset by drought, floods, and layoffs, Rash focuses on their enduring and universal qualities. He tells of their everyday joys and sorrows, of their disappointed religious yearnings, of their strengths, weakness, and foibles. In addition to his poetry and novels, Ron Rash has achieved international acclaim for his short stories.
  • This moth has a large cocoon that is attached to surfaces along its long side.
  • “R” is for Rash, Ron (b. 1953). Poet, novelist. A native of Chester, Rash graduated from Gardner-Webb College and received an M.A. in English from Clemson. Since 2003, he has been the Parris Distinguished Professor in Appalachian Cultural Studies at Western Carolina University. Rash’s family has lived in the southern Appalachian Mountains since the 1700s. His fiction and poetry about the people of Appalachia and the mill towns are filled with gentle humor, family strife, and economic problems. Although the people in his work are beset by drought, floods, and layoffs, Rash focuses on their enduring and universal qualities. He tells of their everyday joys and sorrows, of their disappointed religious yearnings, of their strengths, weakness, and foibles. In addition to his poetry and novels, Ron Rash has achieved international acclaim for his short stories.
  • Lowcountry performing arts organization to perform The Tragedy of Carmen at Hanahan Amphitheater on May 8th