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A Minute with Miles
A Minute with Miles
All Stations: Mon-Fri, 6:43 am and 8:43 am

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you “reach” a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why—and how do you pronounce “Handel”? These and countless other classical music questions are answered on South Carolina Public Radio’s A Minute with Miles. Hosted by longtime NPR commentator Miles Hoffman, the segments inform and entertain as they provide illuminating 60-second flights through the world of classical music. 

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Latest Episodes
  • George Bernard Shaw began his career as a music critic, and in September of 1890 he wrote these words:“People have pointed out evidences of personal…
  • Continuing this week’s series of things I wish I’d written… this is from a 1934 article by the great English music critic Ernest Newman:“We know rather…
  • Words today from the great writer and critic Jacques Barzun. I’ve combined several related passages:“Music is a medium through which certain unnamable…
  • The words today of Hector Berlioz, writing about Beethoven:“… the thousands of men and women… whom he has so often carried away on the wings of his…
  • Quotations, this week, from great musicians and writers. This is from the composer Ernest Bloch:“Real music goes beyond the intentions of its author for…
  • A Minute with Miles
    Sonata Form 2
    "Sonata” and “sonata form” are not the same thing, and that—in any kind of piece, not just sonatas—a movement composed in sonata form consists of three…
  • “Sonata form” and the musical form known as the sonata are not the same thing. A sonata is a piece—usually for piano or for piano and one other…
  • So here’s the famous riddle: Which came first, the chicken... or the violin? Or the piano? Or the valved horn? By the mid-to-late-1500s the members of the…
  • Franz von Suppé could be the poster child for composers who were extremely prolific and very famous in their own time, but who, if they’re now remembered…
  • Fiddle is an older word than violin – there were instruments called fiddles long before violins. Violino, which is Italian for “violin,” is the diminutive…