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agriculture

  • A grower-owned peanut shelling company said it plans to set up operations in South Carolina's Orangeburg County. Premium Peanut said it plans a $64.3 million investment that will create 130 new jobs. News outlets report the new facility will provide more capacity and allow South Carolina peanut growers the chance to be a part of a cooperative model. Portions of the new facility are expected to be operational by spring 2022. The company's customers consist of major snack, candy and peanut butter manufacturers.
  • The State Plant Pest List committee worked with stakeholders and set the ban on this timeline to limit the impact on nurseries or propagation businesses, allow time for the industry and inspectors to receive adequate training, and still try to curb further damage done to our environment by these highly invasive foreign plants.
  • The State Plant Pest List committee worked with stakeholders and set the ban on this timeline to limit the impact on nurseries or propagation businesses, allow time for the industry and inspectors to receive adequate training, and still try to curb further damage done to our environment by these highly invasive foreign plants.
  • Large stands of them taking over fallow fields and roadsides. They crowd out plants that would provide nectar and pollen to a greater variety of beneficial insects over a longer period of time.
  • The first released cultivar of the flowering callery pear was named Bradford and it was easy to grow, pest free, flowered profusely and best of all could not fertilize itself and make viable seeds. But then other cultivars were released into the market resulting in viable pollen being produced and transferred all over the place by insects drawn to those flowers.
  • Large stands of them taking over fallow fields and roadsides. They crowd out plants that would provide nectar and pollen to a greater variety of beneficial insects over a longer period of time.
  • The first released cultivar of the flowering callery pear was named Bradford and it was easy to grow, pest free, flowered profusely and best of all could not fertilize itself and make viable seeds. But then other cultivars were released into the market resulting in viable pollen being produced and transferred all over the place by insects drawn to those flowers.
  • It is not and will not be illegal to have Bradford pears growing in your yard. However, they are now on the State Plant Pest list and beginning October first, two thousand twenty-four, nurseries will no longer sell Bradford pears or any other cultivar of the invasive flowering pear, Pyrus calleryanna.