© 2022 South Carolina Public Radio
Radio Website Header-Waves 6 3.0.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
WRJA-FM, 88.1, Sumter, is currently off the air. Streaming is not affected.
WEPR-FM, 90.1, Greenville/Spartanburg, is operating at low power during tower maintenance. There may also be interruptions of the signal. Streaming is not affected.

civil rights

  • Police in South Carolina have arrested a man who allegedly sent dozens of threats to civil rights attorney and former state lawmaker Bakari Sellers. Grant Edward Olson Jr., of Asheville, North Carolina, is also accused of intimidating Sellers for exercising his civil rights as an attorney, television commentator and lobbyist. Authorities say Olson sent dozens of messages to Sellers on Instagram that included racial slurs and indications that Olson was armed. Police said Olson admitted to sending the messages. Sellers, who's Black, thanked the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division for last week's arrest and said the the threats affected not just him but his family.
  • Orangeburg photographer Cecil Williams has captured thousands of images of African Americans' fight for equal rights over decades and is now set to unveil a wall art series that depicts their history in the state. It is a story which he hopes will reach middle and high schools.
  • A shuttered bowling alley at the center of a 1968 integration protest where state police killed three Black students is being remade into a civil rights center. State troopers shot into a crowd of students on the historically Black campus of South Carolina State University almost 54 years ago. Protesters were trying to pressure the white owner of the All-Star Bowling Lanes into letting Black patrons use the lanes. The National Park Service is helping a non-profit group renovate the All-Star Bowling Lanes, remaking it into a fully-functional bowling alley with a civil rights theme. Tuesday marks the official anniversary of the shootings.
  • The Education Department says it's investigating five Republican-led states that have banned mask requirements in schools, saying the policies could amount to discrimination against students with disabilities or health conditions. The department's office for civil rights sent letters to education chiefs in Iowa, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. Those states have barred schools from requiring masks among students and staff, a move that the department says could prevent some students from safely attending school.
  • This week on Walter Edgar's Journal, we offer another in our series of encore broadcasts celebrating The Journal at 21, with a 2004 conversation with the late U. S. District Judge Matthew Perry. Perry takes us on a journey from his humble beginnings in a segregated South Carolina to his part in helping to break down the color barrier. In between he spins some delightful stories about the people who helped shape South Carolina throughout the turbulent 60’s and 70’s.
  • This week on Walter Edgar's Journal, we offer another in our series of encore broadcasts celebrating The Journal at 21, with a 2004 conversation with the late U. S. District Judge Matthew Perry. Perry takes us on a journey from his humble beginnings in a segregated South Carolina to his part in helping to break down the color barrier. In between he spins some delightful stories about the people who helped shape South Carolina throughout the turbulent 60’s and 70’s.
  • On this edition of the South Carolina Lede for August 17, 2021, journalist Claudia Smith Brinson joins us to discuss her book Stories of Struggles: The Clash Over Civil Rights in South Carolina (2020, USC Press)
  • On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for August 14, 2021, we're joined by Stephen Lowe to discuss his book, The Slow Undoing: The Federal Courts and the Long Struggle for Civil Rights in South Carolina (2021, USC Press). Lowe argues for a reconsideration of the role of the federal courts in the civil rights movement, and places the courts as a central battleground at the intersections of struggles over race, law, and civil rights.
  • On February 12, 1946, Sergeant Isaac Woodard, a returning, decorated African American veteran of World War II, was removed from a Greyhound bus in…
  • After World War I, Black South Carolinians, despite poverty and discrimination, began to organize and lay the basis for the civil rights movement that…