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invasive plants

  • Clematis terniflora is a vine with opposite, pinnately compound leaves, on climbing stems. The flowers are white, borne in fall. It is considered a Category II invasive plant in Florida (north and central) and some other eastern states, meaning invading native plant communities but not yet seen as displacing native species
  • Clematis terniflora is a vine with opposite, pinnately compound leaves, on climbing stems. The flowers are white, borne in fall. It is considered a Category II invasive plant in Florida (north and central) and some other eastern states, meaning invading native plant communities but not yet seen as displacing native species
  • The State Plant Pest List committee worked with stakeholders and set the ban on this timeline to limit the impact on nurseries or propagation businesses, allow time for the industry and inspectors to receive adequate training, and still try to curb further damage done to our environment by these highly invasive foreign plants.
  • The State Plant Pest List committee worked with stakeholders and set the ban on this timeline to limit the impact on nurseries or propagation businesses, allow time for the industry and inspectors to receive adequate training, and still try to curb further damage done to our environment by these highly invasive foreign plants.
  • Large stands of them taking over fallow fields and roadsides. They crowd out plants that would provide nectar and pollen to a greater variety of beneficial insects over a longer period of time.
  • The first released cultivar of the flowering callery pear was named Bradford and it was easy to grow, pest free, flowered profusely and best of all could not fertilize itself and make viable seeds. But then other cultivars were released into the market resulting in viable pollen being produced and transferred all over the place by insects drawn to those flowers.
  • Large stands of them taking over fallow fields and roadsides. They crowd out plants that would provide nectar and pollen to a greater variety of beneficial insects over a longer period of time.
  • The first released cultivar of the flowering callery pear was named Bradford and it was easy to grow, pest free, flowered profusely and best of all could not fertilize itself and make viable seeds. But then other cultivars were released into the market resulting in viable pollen being produced and transferred all over the place by insects drawn to those flowers.