Civil War

“C” is for Chesnut, James, Jr. [1815-1885]

May 15, 2015

“C” is for Chesnut, James, Jr. [1815-1885]. US Senator. Soldier. A Princeton graduate, Chesnut read for the law law and opened a practice in Camden. He represented Kershaw County in the South Carolina House of 

"S" is for Sherman’s March

Apr 9, 2015

"S" is for Sherman’s March. This Union campaign is controversial because of the damage it wrought to civilian property. As he had in Georgia, General William Tecumseh Sherman hoped to destroy railroads, supplies, and morale. On February 1, 1865, he led his army of 60,000 men into South Carolina. On the 17th, Union forces entered Columbia. That night, one-third of the city was destroyed by fire. The Columbia conflagration was unusual only for its size. Barnwell, Orangeburg and other places along Sherman’s thirty mile-wide-path also suffered.

Dr. John Marzsalek
Mississippi State University

--- All Stations: Fri, Apr 10, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Apr 12, 4 pm ---   In his book, Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion for Order (Free Press, 1992) John F. Marszalek presents general William Tecumseh Sherman as a complicated man who, fearing anarchy, searched for the order that he hoped would make his life a success.

Dr. Marszalek talks with Dr. Edgar about Sherman as a military commander who came to abhor what he saw as the senseless slaughter of the War, and who sought a different strategy to bring the South to surrender.

Dr. Heather Andrea Williams
Steve Exum

- All Stations: Fri, Apr 3, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Apr 5, 4 pm -

  Dr. Heather Andrea Williams of Pennsylvania State University joins Dr. Walter Edgar for another "Conversation on the Civil War, 1865." The subject: emancipation and freedom. Williams is one of the world’s leading historians of the experience of slavery in the 19th century. Her award-winning first book, Self-Taught: African-American Education in Slavery and Freedom (University of North Carolina Press, 2005), argued that education was inseparable from the fight against slavery.

---All Stations: Fri, Mar 20, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Mar 22, 4 pm ---In a remarkable reappraisal of Lincoln, the distinguished historian O. Vernon Burton shows how the president’s authentic Southernness empowered him to conduct a civil war that redefined freedom as a personal right to be expanded to all Americans. In the violent decades to follow, the extent of that freedom would be contested but not its central place in what defined the country.

Dr. William J. Cooper, Jr.
Louisiana State University

  The University of South Carolina’s College of Arts and Humanities and Institute for Southern Studies concludes its series Conversations on the Civil War with a look back to 1865, the end of the war, the beginning of freedom for thousands of slaves, and the period of Reconstruction in the South.

  (Note: this program was originally scheduled  for 02/20/15)

  The University of South Carolina’s College of Arts and Humanities and Institute for Southern Studies concludes its series Conversations on the Civil War with a look back to 1865, the end of the war, the beginning of freedom for thousands of slaves, and the period of Reconstruction in the South.

Dr. Mark M. Smith
University of South Carolina

Dr. Mark M. Smith, of the University of South Carolina, returns to The Journal to talk about his book The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege: A Sensory History of the Civil War (Oxford University Press, 2014). No other book has looked at the Civil War through the prism of the five senses, or considered their impact on various groups of indviduals.

All Stations: Fri, Oct 3, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Oct 5, 4 pm 

Dr. Charles H. Lippy, the LeRoy A. Martin distinguished Professor of Religious Studies Emeritus at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and author of Religion in South Carolina will be giving a lecture in October at Ebenezer Lutheran Church, Columbia, on How the Civil War Transformed Religion in South Carolina . He stops by our studios to preview the topic with Dr. Edgar.

Dr. Melissa Walker is the author of numerous books on the Civil War and is co-editor of Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War (USC Press, 2011). She talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the role of “plain folk”—especially women—during the war.

This presentation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 28, and was part of the series “Conversations on the Civil War, 1864,” presented in January and February, 2014. The series is sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.

Pages