making it grow

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Dean Moss is the “unpaid” executive director of the Spanish Moss Trail in Beaufort. He spent the day with us recently as we filmed this incredible infrastructure treasure that is transforming life in Beaufort for many citizens. Beaufort is flat, the weather is generally pleasant, and bike riding would be delightful except that our culture does not safely accommodate bike and vehicle traffic sharing the same roads.

Spanish Moss Trail

Nov 21, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Making It Grow spent a lovely day in Beaufort recently learning about and filming portions of the Spanish Moss Trail. The Magnolia Rail Line began in the late 1800’s carrying freight for twenty miles to the Port of Port Royal. Both the port and railroad were decommissioned in the early 2000’s, the train right of way now belongs to Beaufort County and has become the Spanish Moss Trail.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. When I was a little girl, we would take pennies and put them on the railroad tracks in Saluda NC– then come back after the trains had roared through and try to find those flattened pieces of copper. For many people trains are magical – they have memories of riding the trains to camp, to college, or to visit family across the country.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Railroads were the backbone of American growth but in recent years shipping by truck has supplanted their use. According to the rails to trails movement, by 1984 from 4000 to 8000 miles of track were being abandoned each year. This left corridors that went through neighbors, down busy city streets, and through miles and miles of agriculture and timberlands unused.

White Cabbage Moths

Oct 26, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. When we were little, we started walking barefooted up and down our long, gravel driveway in February so when warm days came, our feet would be tough enough to easily forego shoes when we were outside playing. My father had to catch a white butterfly in the spring before he could let his feet breath freely. What he probably was looking for was a pest of our Brassica crops – the imported white cabbage moth.

Mustard Greens

Oct 25, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. When my mother felt a little low in energy, she’d say, “I need some Lexington County tender greens, which are a type of mustard green. These come from Brassica juncea, a different species than the collards and kales, and originated in western or central Asia.

Jersey Cabbage

Oct 24, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Early wild types of cabbages grew in the warmer parts of Western Europe, including the Channel Islands. One in particular, the Jersey cabbage or Long Jacks, grows up to ten feet tall!   To cultivate a straight stem, growers would strip the leaves off as they matured and use them as nutritious food for livestock, giving rise to another common name of cow cabbage.

Wild Cabbages?

Oct 23, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Collards and kale are considered wild type members of the cabbage family. These species of the Brassica genus originated in the Mediterranean area, where they were eaten by the Romans and Greeks two thousand years ago. As the Roman Empire expanded, they were introduced into southwest Europe and even England. Cato the Elder, a Roman senator and historian living roughly 200 years before the Christian era, also had an interest in agriculture.

Origin of "Greens"

Oct 21, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Tony Melton told us recently that the greens which were planted months ago are sitting in the field waiting for rain. Well, we’ve finally gotten that much needed heavenly precipitation, and from Tony's extensive knowledge, our South Carolina collards and kale should quickly rebound from their slow start.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is considered one of the worst invasive species that’s arrived in our country from Asia. First discovered in Pennsylvania in 2001, it’s now found in most of the US and has spread to other continents. In all cases, it’s a major pest of agriculture and difficult to control, requiring increases in pesticide use as it feeds on a wide variety of crops including fruits and vegetables.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. We’ve had ninety degree temperatures in October, but during a brief cool spell in September, one of the worst imported pests, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, started its annual intrusion into my upstairs.  I awoke one morning to find these garden pests hanging out on my curtains and Edward had to suck them up with the vacuum, then empty the canister into a bag, seal it, and put it in the trash.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I’ve heard stories of a farming family that almost separated as a new wife, raised in the city, put up wallpaper covered with morning glories. Ipomoea purpurea commonly known as Heavenly blue morning glory, is native to the Central Valley of Mexico and is considered an aggressive weed in agricultural crops like cotton and corn. As I drive on 601 from St.

Fall Favorites

Oct 16, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. This time of year I’m reminded of fixing flowers for the happy second marriage of a friend because I used a native and an imported flower that are flowering right now. Both of them seem to pop up overnight. The native plant was Farewell to Summer which grows in sandy, dry soils. The imported plant was red spider lily and has been a staple of Southern gardens for hundreds of years and persists unless its foliage gets mowed down too often.

Farewell to Summer

Oct 14, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. September 22 was the first day of fall. Today is October 2 and it is going to be 98 degrees at my home in Saint Matthews. On my commute to Sumter, however, I’m seeing one of my favorite plant in the whole wide world. The common name for   is Farewell to Summer, the scientific name is Polygonella americanum.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Boxwood blight is a highly contagious fungal disease that is wiping out whole plantings of this beautiful evergreen which is the backbone of many gardens. If you have a maintenance crew helping in your yard, they can introduce the infectious spores from their shoes and clothing – and if they prune through their tools. There are some boxwood species/cultivars with some tolerance.

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