natural disasters

SC Lede: Life After Florence

Sep 25, 2018

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Post and Courier's Joe Cranney and Associated Press' Meg Kinnard to discuss the aftermath of Hurricane Florence and the record flooding that continues to affect us and could result in billions of dollars in damages.

South Carolina Public Radio's own Statehouse Reporter Russ McKinney also stops by to quiz Gavin with South Carolina trivia in this week's Did You Know segment.

“It’s been chaos here in Puerto Rico,” says Ezequiel Rodríguez-Andino, an independent radio producer in the capital, San Juan. The phones have been down, along with most internet service. The roads are blocked, and there are long lines for food, water and fuel, he says. 

“The whole island has been affected,” Rodríguez-Andino says. “Every single town has been affected in some way.” 

Residents in Nichols, SC are rescued by boat after Hurricane Matthew in 2016
Courtesty of Nichols resident Courtney Wilds

The first 72 hours after a disaster are critical. The Federal Emergency Management Administration’s (FEMA) website reminds that electricity, gas, water and telephones may not be working and that public safety services such as police and fire departments may not be able to reach you immediately during a serious crisis.

The agency recommends individuals should be prepared to be self-sufficient (able to live without running water, electricity and/or gas, and telephones) for at least three days following a disaster.