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  More than $2 million is lost to fraud in South Carolina every year, says Juliana Harris of the South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs. The department tracks scams in the state, and receives 3,000 to 4,000 reports of these crimes each year. Harris lists some of the more common scams, how consumers can spot them, and how people can avoid being taken in by scammers.


Race car driver
Parker Anderson

  For more than half a century, one of NASCAR’s greatest races, the Southern 500, was held on Labor Day weekend. In 2003 the race was moved, and for the next dozen years was held on various days from March to November. NASCAR fans are now celebrating the return of the Bojangles Southern 500 to its traditional home slot, as this year’s race will be held once again on the weekend before Labor Day. Some of those happy about the return include Gov. Nikki Haley, NASCAR drivers Ryan Blaney and Kevin Harvick (the defending Southern 500 champion) and super fan William McElveen.

  

Larry Doby, 1953
Bowman Gum [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  Camden native Larry Doby was the first African American to play Major League Baseball in the American League, joining the Cleveland Indians on July 5, 1947, just 11 weeks after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in the National League with the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Indians recently honored Doby with a statue outside Progressive Stadium in Cleveland. Camden is justifiably proud of Doby – who was the first black player on a World Series Championship team – as is evidenced by the comments of Camden Archives and Museum Director Catherine Richardson and Tom Didato, sports editor with the Camden Chronicle Independent.


USS Hornet (CV-8) with USS Gwin (DD-433) during Doolittle Raid 1942.
USAF

  In 1945, the Japanese surrendered to end World War II on Sept. 2, officially observed as V-J Day in the United States. But few people realize that the road to victory began with America’s first victory – at least, psychologically – over Japan: the Doolittle Raid, in which 16 B-25 bombers launched from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Hornet bombed Tokyo in the first strike back at Japan after Pearl Harbor. James Scott, author of the new book “Target Tokyo,” talks about the raid, its affect both on America’s morale and Japan’s sense of invincibility, and how South Carolina played a part in this historic event: the raiders were first assembled and volunteered for this dangerous and daring mission in Columbia.


  The number of women’s colleges has declined severely over the past 50 years, from 230 to 45. A variety of causes is blamed, from more acceptance at coed colleges to some being located in small, remote towns. Beth Dinndorf, president of Columbia College, tells how her school has defied the trend and talks about how women’s colleges can compete and stay relevant in the 21st century. Columbia College student Laura Mauer tells us that she doesn’t miss the distractions of men on campus and lists some of the advantages that she sees in women’s colleges.


  It’s National Farmer’s Market Week, and BetterDoctor.com, an online consumer health site, has named the South Carolina state Farmer’s Market the number 5 community-oriented farmer’s market in the nation. We talk with market Manager Brad Boozer and vendor Jason McCarter about what makes the market a top 5 market, and how it attracts wholesalers from as far away as New York to the Midlands of South Carolina to buy produce.


  As thousands watched, the Confederate battle flag was lowered from beside the Confederate soldier monument on the State House grounds for the last time Friday, July 10. It was presented to the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum, where it eventually will be exhibited. Relic Room Director Allen Roberson talks about the flag and the museum’s intentions to exhibit it appropriately after a thoughtful plan is formed.


Russ McKinney recaps an historic week at the South Carolina State House which culminated in the removal of the Confederate battle flag from the capitol grounds to the Confederate Relic Room and Millitary Museum.

  

The Confederate battle flag on the grounds of the South Carolina State House, July 9, 2015.
Jim Covington

  In an historic move, the South Carolina House of Representatives early Thursday morning followed the Senate’s vote with its own vote to take down the Confederate battle flag from the State House grounds. Several dozen people braved the noonday sun of the capital grounds Thursday to take pictures, be witnesses to history and soak up the atmosphere in anticipation of the flag’s removal. A number of them reflected on the flag and its meaning, and gave their opinions of the historic event.


  People from all walks of life lined up for hours on Friday, June 26 for the funeral of state Sen. Clementa Pinckney. The senator also was the beloved pastor of Charleston’s historic Emanuel AME Church, where the shooting of nine people at a Bible study the week before shocked the nation. Among those in the line was SCETV President and CEO Linda O’Bryon, who met and interviewed the Rev. Dr. Bill McGill, pastor of Imani Baptist Temple in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as they stood waiting to be admitted to the arena where the funeral was held. McGill shared his thoughts on the occasion, and why he felt its importance compelled him to make the long journey to be in attendance.


  This is podcast is part two of recorded coverage of the funeral of South Carolina Senator Clementa Pinckney, June 26, 2015. Sen. Pinckney was pastor of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC. He and eight members of his congregation were fatally shot along in a mass killing during evening bible study on Wednesday, June 17, 2015.

The funeral was broadcast live from the TD Arena at the College of Charleston, anchored by ETV's Beryl Dakers with Dr. Walter Edgar, professor emeritus of Southern Studies at the University of South Carolina, and ETV Radio's Russ McKinney. President Barack Obama delivered the eulogy.


Flowers, notes, and other items placed as memorials to the slain outside Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston in June, 2015.
Linda O'Bryon/SC Public Radio

  Drisana McDaniel is a Charlestonian who teaches anti-bias workshops for the Transformative Teaching Collective. Her family was personally touched by the recent murders at Emanuel A.M.E. Church. She talks with Jeanette Guinn about her own reaction to the tragedy, about how individuals are coping, and about how the people of Charleston are drawing together to comfort each other.


Memorials outside Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston on Sunday, June 21, 2015.
Linda O'Bryon

  The killing of nine members of Emanuel A.M.E. Church last week turned the nation’s attention Charleston, South Carolina, and, in no small measure to their church home. “Mother Emanuel,” as it is known, was established in the 19th century and has long been important to Charleston’s African American community. Historian Walter Edgar with Dr. Bobby Donaldson of USC and Dr. Jon N. Hale of the College of Charleston about Emanuel A.M.E. Church.


State Troopers bear the body of Sen. Clementa Pinckney to the South Carolina State House rotunda on Wednesday.
David Hunt

  State Senator Clementa Pinckney was not only a respected member of the South Carolina legislature, he was also a father, a husband and a friend to many people in and out of South Carolina. In addition, he was the beloved pastor of Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. In this report we hear from several of those who knew him well, and learn how their lives were touched by Pinckney.


Participants in "Black Lives Matter" march in Charleston, SC, June 20, 2015.
Jeanette Guinn

    Joy Vandervort-Cobb is an Associate Professor of Theater at the College of Charleston. She spoke candidly with Jeanette Guinn about her participation in Saturday's "March for Black Lives," which took place in the wake of the recent murder of 9 members of Emanuel A.M.E. Church. Vandervort-Cobb sees the march as part of the process by which the city can begin to heal and move toward racial equality.


  In the wake of the shootings at Charleston’s Emanuel AME Church, a renewed effort has arisen to remove the Confederate battle flag from the grounds of the State House. Among those calling for its removal is Gov. Nikki Haley, but there remain prominent South Carolinians on both sides of the issue. Today we hear from two of them: State Representative Jonathan Hill of Anderson, a republican who represents House District 8, and the Rev. Nelson Rivers IIL, long time Civil Rights activist and Vice President of Religious Affairs and External Relations for the National Action Network.


Linda O'Bryon

  The tragic shootings in Charleston last week shocked and saddened South Carolinians and all Americans.  But the resilience of Charlestonians shone through as they returned violence and hate with forgiveness.  In this report, U.S. Representative James Clyburn of South Carolina’s sixth congressional district remembers his friend, pastor and State Senator Clementa Pinckney, and gives his thoughts on why and how Charleston has remained  calm and has come together to heal after the tragedy.


Denmark Vesey
Courtesy National Park Service

  There's a long history to the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C., — affectionately known as "Mother Emanuel" — where nine churchgoers were allegedly shot and killed by 21-year-old Dylann Roof on Wednesday night. Part of that history involves Denmark Vesey, a West Indian slave, and later a freedman, who planned what would have been one of the largest slave rebellions in the United States had word of the plans not been leaked.

The revolt was to take place on Bastille Day, July 17, 1822, and was in reaction to the city of Charleston's suppression of the African Church, which boasted a membership of over three thousand in 1820. News of the plan leaked and Charleston authorities arrested the plot's leaders before the uprising could begin.

Dr. Bernard E. Powers, Jr., Professor of History and Director of African-American Studies at the College of Charleston, joins Dr. Edgar to talk about Denmark Vesey and why his name still has resonance today. (Originally broadcast 03/14/08)


Red Bellied Snake
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    This week on South Carolina Focus, we talk with Jim Knight, one of the state’s leading herpetologists, or reptile experts. He’s been studying and handling snakes, his specialty, for more than half a century, and now that summer is approaching, he says people who are out and about in the woods, on the lakes or even in their yards, may encounter a snake. Knight imparts some good advice on what to do in these unexpected meetings, and reminds us of the important role that snakes play in the cycle of nature, and perhaps even in the future treatment of some diseases as well.


Roy Thomas
Alan Waite

  This week on South Carolina Focus, we talk with Roy Thomas, who wrote and edited The Avengers, among other titles, for Marvel Comics, and who recently authored the colorful tome “75 Years of Marvel: From the Golden Age to the Silver Screen.” The St. Matthews, SC, resident talks about the new blockbuster movie “The Avengers: Age of Ultron,” featuring the title villain he created, and gives us a glimpse into the world of comics with the “true” origin of the Avengers, inspired more by printers’ deadlines than a brainstorm for a new “dream team” of heroes.


Musica Nuda
Angelo Trani

Vocalist Petra Magoni, and bassist Ferruccio Spinetti form the unique duo Musica Nuda, or “Naked Music.” They will present two concerts at Spoleto on May 21 and 22 at the College of Charleston that will demonstrate an amazing repertoire that encompasses jazz, rock, classical and more. Ms. Magoni talks about how the duo was formed and why it feels no limits on what it can perform even with its minimal instrumentation.


Pillars of Creation, 2015
NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI / AURA)

South Carolina Focus we talk with NASA head Charles Bolden about the amazing Hubble Space Telescope, which has, for the last quarter-century, provided breathtaking photographs of outer space never before possible. It has opened up so much new information to science it has caused textbooks on astronomy and astrophysics to be rewritten.

Post & Courier reporter Jennifer Berry Hawes
Post & Courier, Charleston, SC

  This week on South Carolina Focus we look at a respected state newspaper that has distinguished itself nationally: the Charleston Post and Courier was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for public service for its series on domestic violence in South Carolina. Largely because of the series, the General Assembly has put forward legislation to combat this serious problem in our state. We talk with two of the reporters who worked on the series about their feelings on the problem and the prestigious prize their work has earned.


Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET

The Post and Courier of Charleston, S.C., has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize award for public service for Till Death Do Us Part, a series the award's panel said "probed why South Carolina is among the deadliest states in the union for women and put the issue of what to do about it on the state's agenda."

Last Days in Vietnam

Apr 20, 2015
Photo by Hiroji Kubota

  “Last Days in Vietnam” is a new film documenting the end of the Vietnam War on the 40th anniversary of America’s withdrawal from Saigon.  The film, produced and directed by Rory Kennedy, youngest child of the late U.S. Sen. Robert Kennedy, will air on PBS and ETV April 28 at 9 p.m.


Tut Underwood
SCETV

  A good breakfast can sometimes be worth traveling for – if you’re a member of the South Carolina Breakfast Club.


As second novels go, this one should prove a doozy. More than five decades after Harper Lee published her first — and, so far, only — novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee's publisher has announced that she plans to release a new one. The book, currently titled Go Set a Watchman, will be published July 14.

Updated at 2:28 p.m. ET

A judge in South Carolina has thrown out the convictions of the Friendship Nine, nine black men who integrated a whites-only lunch counter in 1961, at the peak of the civil rights movement.

"We cannot rewrite history, but we can right history," Judge John C. Hayes III said before signing the order that vacated their trespassing convictions. (Hayes is the nephew of the judge who handed down the original sentence.) The prosecutor apologized to the eight surviving members of the Friendship Nine who were in the courtroom.

James B. Edwards
Washington Times

  With the passing of former South Carolina Governor James B. Edwards, on December 26, 2014, Walter Edgar's Journal offers an encore of a conversation between Dr. Edgar and the Governor, which first aired in October of 2004.

Edwards was the first Republican Governor elected since Reconstruction.  Walter talks with him about his time in office…both on the state and federal levels. 

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