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Hong Kong is slipping into dysfunction so rapidly that, for its citizens, normality is being constantly redefined.

Slugfests between riot cops and black-clad protesters. Glitzy avenues lit up by flaming barricades. A DIY catapult heaving stones toward police. Just months ago, much of it would have been hard to imagine.

It’s been more than a half century since the United States last convicted a citizen of treason. Almost never has the US charged an elected leader with the crime. 

But another country has convicted one, as recently as this year: Ukraine. 

Polish author Olga Tokarczuk was named the 2018 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday, after a sexual assault scandal led to last year's award being postponed. Austrian writer Peter Handke won the 2019 Nobel Prize for Literature.

The White House on Sunday said President Donald Trump had endorsed a controversial plan to pull US troops away from key border posts in the Kurdish region of northern Syria and to allow the Turkish military to move in. The president defended his decision Monday with a tweet: "I was elected on getting out of these ridiculous endless wars."

This weeks marks one year since the killing of Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi. 

Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist who lived in Turkey as an exile, was murdered on Oct. 2, 2018, inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. His dismembered body has never been found. A global outcry ensued and led to US Treasury sanctions on 17 Saudi individuals, and a Senate resolution blaming Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Saudi officials have denied suspicions in the CIA that Crown Prince Mohammed, or MBS, ordered the killing. Eleven people are on trial in Saudi Arabia.

US President Donald Trump on Monday intensified his attacks on a lawmaker leading the House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry, suggesting that Rep. Adam Schiff should be arrested for "treason."

Witnesses are due to testify in the House this week in hearings related to Trump's request that a foreign power investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, one of the leading Democratic candidates seeking to challenge him in 2020.

The day Kara Ulmer closed down the refugee resettlement office she led in Akron, Ohio, was one of the hardest days of her life. 

Students and teachers in Québec have returned to school for the first time since a law banned teachers and public employees in positions of “authority” from wearing religious symbols — this means no headscarves, Sikh turbans, Christian crosses or Jewish skullcaps.

The law, which passed in June, is not a complete ban and included a clause that applies the law only to new hires or those who change jobs.

At around 3 a.m. one night in 2017, Bilol, an Uzbek immigrant, heard a knock on his door.

“There were around 25 people,” Bilol said later. They included FBI, immigration authorities and NYPD officers. Even an ambulance arrived.

Related: What it’s like to become a US citizen after a lifetime of statelessness

A 'Pang!' of emotion, Gruff Rhys drops new album

Sep 20, 2019

Gruff Rhys is known for Britain's indie rock band, Super Furry Animals. But the Welsh musician just dropped a groovy new solo album this month titled, "Pang!" 

The album is a collaboration with Muzi, a South African electronic artist and producer who worked with Rhys to put a new spin on his beats. 

Rhys spoke with The World's Carol Hills about the album, and the political issues it references. 

Growing up in an Ethiopian refugee camp, Tecle Gebremichael used to dream of going to school in the United States. 

He finally got that chance in 2012, when he was resettled to the US and landed in Boise, Idaho. Now 29 years old, Gebremichael is a homeowner, student at Boise State University, and petroleum supply specialist for the US Army Reserves. He’s also running for a seat on Boise’s city council. 

Gebremichael, who recently became an American citizen, credits the United States’ refugee resettlement program for allowing him to fulfill his American dream.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinta Arden introduced a new bill to parliament on Friday that aims to further tighten gun laws, as the country marks six months since the mass shooting in Christchurch that killed 51 Muslim worshippers.

This is New Zealand's second set of gun reforms after weak firearm laws were identified as a key reason why a suspected white supremacist was able to own semi-automatic weapons that he used to kill people gathered at two mosques for Friday prayers on March 15. A mandatory nationwide gun buy-back program was part of the reforms.

A storm system threatening the Bahamas with more heavy downpours and strong winds on Friday hampered the search for some 1,300 people missing in the wake of the worst hurricane in the nation's history and a massive humanitarian operation to help survivors.

The unnamed system, which had the potential of becoming a tropical storm, could drop up to 6 inches of rain through Sunday in some areas that were inundated nearly two weeks ago by Hurricane Dorian, forecasters said.

For many Israelis, this election is all about Bibi

Sep 13, 2019

Israelis are heading back to the polls for the second time this year, and whether they love him, can’t stand him or happen to be indifferent about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, this election is all about “Bibi,” as he’s known. 

On Friday, the latest polling numbers found Netanyahu’s right-wing Likud party and the centrist Kahol Lavan, the “Blue and White” party, locked in a dead heat. Each party was projected to win 32 seats in Israel’s parliament, the Knesset. 

Canada’s campaign for federal parliamentary elections officially began Wednesday. Voting will take place on Oct. 21 in what is expected to be a close contest between the parties led by incumbent Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and Conservative leader Andrew Scheer. 

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