PRI - APM

News and features from American Public Media and Public Radio International.

Ways to Connect

I started getting into photography when I was 18 and bought my first camera with money I earned waiting tables in a restaurant in Sari, in northern Iran.

After decades in the shadows, Russia's feminists grab their spotlight

Jun 5, 2019

Russian feminists paraded a 13-foot-tall model vagina down the streets of St. Petersburg on May 1, 2018, without getting arrested. It was a big win.

“[Police] arrested only those who they have orders to arrest,” says Leda Garina, director of the Eve's Ribs, a social, artistic, documentary and communication project devoted to the subject of gender discrimination. “But there were no vagina orders, so they didn’t know how to react.”

Australian Federal Police executed a raid at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) offices to search thousands of documents relating to investigative stories that ABC reported in 2017 regarding alleged misconduct of Australian troops in Afghanistan. Authorities say the material was classified, and their search warrant covered thousands of documents, emails, raw footage and broadcast scripts relating to the stories. 

Russia's youth flex their political power

Jun 4, 2019

Is Russia "United” or looking to the “Future?”

For President Vladimir Putin, who leads the “United Russia” party and opposition leader Alexei Navalny, founder of “Russia of the Future,” it's an important question. It's also one the world is increasingly looking toward young people to answer.  

Arina Malinofskaya spends her weekends at animal shelters across Moscow helping dogs and cats get adopted. On a sunny May Saturday, Malinofskaya is in charge of volunteers at the 10th annual WOOF fest, a yearly adoption event run by the NIKA Charitable Foundation.

Toronto fans are going nuts. Their basketball team, the Toronto Raptors, is going to the NBA finals for the first time in the franchise's history.

Superfan Nav Bhatia is even more excited than most. If you've ever watched a Raptors game on TV, you've seen Bhatia courtside, in his characteristic Sikh turban and jersey.

Twitter found out about Bhatia over the past weekend in a viral thread: 

President Donald Trump is heading to Japan for a weekend visit. On the official agenda: well, not much.

The president is expected to play some golf with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Trump will take in some sumo and be served some well-done steak, just the way he likes it. The Japanese seem to be making a concerted effort to keep Trump busy, perhaps so nothing can go off script. After all, they’ve been burned by him before, a long time ago.

Sen. Chris Murphy says Trump's Iran plan is 'blind escalation with no endgame'

May 24, 2019

President Donald Trump says he does not want war with Iran. But his administration is still sounding the alarm.

"This threat from Iran remains," Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told CNBC on Thursday. "We've had some luck in disrupting some of the tactical things that were in front of us, I think it's fair to say. But make sure we're still on high alert."

The trope that migrants bring diseases that threaten immigrant-receiving countries is among the most pervasive myths touted in anti-immigrant discourse, and one justification of racist and humiliating policies directed toward immigrants throughout history. 

Is your phone listening to you?

May 17, 2019

It's a spooky feeling: You're discussing a TV show or a pair of shoes or whatever with a friend, then you open Instagram and see an ad for the exact thing you were just talking about. But it's not like your phone is listening ... right? Plus: How delivery apps are changing the restaurant business and the legacy of Grumpy Cat.

Donald Trump says auto imports from Japan and the E.U. threaten the U.S.'s national security. SAT participants will now get an "adversity score," but they won't know what it is. Plus, we travel to Denmark, where top chefs are developing the foods of the future. Rollie pollies, anyone?

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

The age of fraud

May 17, 2019

Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio kicks off the special series "Brains and Losses," which looks at the financial vulnerability of an aging population. Then, more than 40 states are now suing Oxycontin maker Purdue.

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

Spoilers are good for you

May 17, 2019

From the BBC World Service... Facebook has banned an Israeli company it believes was behind hundreds of fake accounts, mostly targeting elections in six African countries. Then, we explain why climate change is a major issue in Australia's upcoming elections. Plus, do story spoilers necessarily spoil stories?

Today's show is sponsored by Indeed and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage.

It's the final installment in our kickoff week of "How We Survive," an ongoing series about how technology can help us adapt to climate change. It's controversial to talk about using more money and technology to adapt versus efforts to mitigate, or slow down, global warming. Marketplace's Scott Tong tells us how he's seen the adaptation versus mitigation debate evolve in his years of reporting on climate change.

Today's show is sponsored by Clickshare and Indeed.

When we last talked with Ed Bastian in 2016, he had only just been appointed CEO of Delta Air Lines. This time we caught up with him at Los Angeles International Airport as he stepped off a flight from Atlanta.

Pages