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On April 26, 1986, the No. 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant near Pripyat, Ukraine, exploded and started a fire during a safety test. By the time the fire was contained, the incident — one of only two level-7 events in history on the International Nuclear Event Scale — had sent deadly radiation into the air and over western Europe, killed dozens and sickened more. 

HBO is releasing a five-part miniseries dramatizing the disaster, which was the worst nuclear power accident in history.

112: What. The. Fed.

May 7, 2019

The Federal Reserve's got quite the puzzle on its hands. We're dealing with one of the longest job growth streaks in modern history. And yet, the economy isn't working as expected. Interest rates and inflation are simply not behaving according to standard economic models. And it’s the Fed’s job to figure out what’s going on in the name of keeping things stable and growing. New York Times' senior economics correspondent Neil Irwin returns to break things down for us. Plus, we hear from the 'Iolani High School economics team (good luck at the finals!) on their favorite Fed chairs.

Met Gala red carpet faces challenge from influencers

May 7, 2019

The Met Gala is possibly the biggest fashion event of the year. Designers create elaborate gowns in order to put the spotlight on their brands as millions watch the red carpet. But with the rise of influencers and fashion houses paying celebrities directly to model their designs, could the Met Gala be losing some of its cachet?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

A million species of life on this planet are facing imminent extinction because of human activity, according to a United Nations report. That report makes clear that there are consequences — economic consequences — for humans.

British retailers expect royal baby sales bump

May 7, 2019

The baby watch has ended and ... it's a boy!

The Duchess of Sussex, better known as Meghan Markle, yesterday gave birth to the British monarchy's first mixed-race child. Retailers around the country are set to see their cash registers ring amid the celebrations.

Meghan, 37, went into labor in the early hours of Monday morning with Prince Harry, 34, by her side, according to Buckingham Palace. Their son's name has yet to be released and it is unclear if he will receive a royal title.

Schools struggle to address rising student homelessness

May 7, 2019

Cecilia Sirianni's small office at Massabesic High School can sometimes get a bit messy. Piles of donated clothes and boxes of snacks fill cabinets and shelves — all for students at the rural district in York County, Maine. For more than a decade, a big part of Sirianni's job has been to identify kids and families who are homeless and help them meet basic needs.

The deal deadline over Chinese tariffs looms as talks continue this week. Mexican President Andrés Manuel Lopes Obrador is dealing a huge blow to oil thieves. Plus, we look at how some schools districts are making sure students experiencing homelessness don't get left behind.

Today's show is sponsored by BitSight Technologies, the United States Postal Service and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage

Uber and Lyft drivers are banding together to launch a strike on Wednesday in several major American cities. The strike comes just days ahead of Uber’s IPO launch, planned for Friday. The drivers are seeking better working conditions, higher pay and a cap on corporate commissions. Frustration among rideshare drivers has been exacerbated by controversial public offerings from Lyft and Uber. In their IPO filings, both companies have described drivers’ employment status and pay as threatening revenue.

U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is set to testify before a House appropriations subcommittee Tuesday. Bernhardt is likely to face questions about a severe maintenance backlog in the National Park Service, which says it can’t afford to keep its parks looking like what people expect. "These funding problems really threaten not just the integrity of the cultural natural resources that make parks so special, but also of the tourism economy that is so important," said John Garder, senior director of budget and appropriations with the National Parks Conservation Association.

How one species is killing off one million others

May 7, 2019

The Fed is keeping a close eye on risky corporate borrowing. The National Parks Service budget gets the spotlight on Capitol Hill. Plus, a new U.N. report finds one million species are at risk of extinction due to human activity.

Today's show is sponsored by BitSight Technologies, the United States Postal Service and Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage

Where do things stand with the trade war?

May 6, 2019

In a couple of tweets over the weekend, President Donald Trump threatened more tariffs on more Chinese goods. It's another twist in a long saga that's had a lot of turns already, and it's just one of several international trade disputes the Trump administration is currently involved in. That's why we figured today would be a good day for a trade war update.

How a Canadian city "Uberized" its public transportation

May 6, 2019

With an IPO debut later this week and ongoing employee strikes, Uber has been nothing short of newsworthy. The next bit of news about the ride-hailing company includes partnering with cities to improve their public transit systems. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal talked to CityLab's Laura Bliss about how the Canadian city of Innisfil has "Uberized" its public transportation system.

My Economy: Dealing with trade uncertainty

May 6, 2019

My Economy tells the story of the new economic normal through the eyes of people trying to make it, because we know the only numbers that really matter are the ones in your economy.

The tariff hikes that President Donald Trump is threatening would come at a time when inflation has otherwise been pretty quiet. Too quiet, according to some economists, since the economy's booming and productivity's on the rise. So could boosting tariffs on Chinese goods to 25% finally lead to some inflation?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

In Beijing, President Donald Trump’s new threat to hike tariffs on Chinese goods has not gone over well. Stocks fell 5% in one Chinese stock exchange, 7.4% in another, and the currency tumbled. Politically, this puts Chinese leaders in a tough position. They want to end this trade war, but as we know, all politics — even in China — is local. And President Xi Jinping cannot afford to look weak before a domestic audience.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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