SC Features

Women Vision SC: Pastor Nannie Jefferies

Jul 9, 2019
Pastor Nannie Jefferies
SCETV

Pastor, Maranatha Free Church of Jesus Christ

Founder, Exec. Director, Angels Change Ministry

Women Vision SC: JoAnn Turnquist

Jul 2, 2019
JoAnn Turnquist
SCETV

President & CEO, Central Carolina Community Foundation; Former Chair,  Richland County Library

Women Vision SC: Minor Mickel Shaw

Jun 25, 2019
Minor Mickel Shaw
SCETV

President, Micco, LLC; Chairman of the Greenville-Spartanburg Airport Commission

Women Vision SC: Hope Blackley

Jun 18, 2019
Hope Blackey
SCETV

District Director, Office of U.S. Representative William Timmons (SC-04)
Former Spartanburg County Clerk of Court

Women Vision SC: Heather Holmquist

Jun 11, 2019
Heather Holmquist
SCETV

President, The Maritime Association of South Carolina

Women Vision SC: Elaine T. Freeman

Jun 4, 2019
Elaine Freeman
SCETV

Founder, ETV Endowment; Executive Producer, South Carolinians in WW II

Women Vision SC: Karen Alexander

May 28, 2019
Karen Alexander
SCETV

President and CEO, Auntie Karen Foundation; Producer, songwriter, author

Women Vision SC: Jennifer Gutierrez-Caldwell

May 21, 2019

Jennifer Gutierrez-Caldwell is the Director of Youth Services at Pendleton Place.

Women Vision SC: Inez Tenenbaum

May 14, 2019

Inez Tenenbaum practices law at Wyche, P.A. in Columbia and Greenville. She is the former Chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the former Superintendent of Education for South Carolina.

Women Vision SC: Anita Singleton-Prather

May 7, 2019
Anita Singleton-Prather
SCETV

Also known as Aunt Pearlie Sue, Singleton-Prather is an educator, storyteller, and historian of the Gullah culture.

Bradley Fuller / South Carolina Public Radio

“If you’re afraid of getting into Shakespeare, start with the music.”

For Dr. Sarah Williams, associate professor of music history at the University of South Carolina, the sometimes-challenging task of understanding the works of William Shakespeare can be made easier -- and more enjoyable -- through music. A specialist in the popular music and culture of England in Shakespeare’s time, Sarah suggests that common notions about the playwright and his works often miss the mark.

Pondering Plastic - Wildlife, Bans and Trash

Mar 26, 2019
Voldemort, a loggerhead being treated at the South Carolina Aquarium's Sea Turtle Hospital
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

He weighs less than five pounds, but Zazu had big belly problems when he was rescued off the Isle of Palms coast nearly three months ago.  The tiny, green sea turtle had eaten plastic, all kinds of plastic; part of a balloon, clear sheets of plastic and material from a grocery bag. 

The juvenile  turtle is the 23rd patient admitted to the South Carolina Aquarium’s sea turtle hospital because of sea debris.  He swims in a private tank next to 17 others now in recovery, including a 260 pound loggerhead named Voldemort who got caught up in crab traps nearly a year ago.

Ann Marie Luc was just a year old when her mother gave her away in Vietnam.   She was born to a Vietnamese woman and an American father serving in the Army during the Vietnam War.  She had been passed between several families and had four different names by the time she was 17 years-old.   That’s when she moved to the United States with a birth certificate she says was not her own.

“A lot them buy and sell us,” she says of the adoptive families.  “A lot them just use us to come here."

It would be decades before Ann knew she had a sister, born during the war as well.

Protestors against offshore drilling gathered last month outside Charleston's Federal Courthouse
Victoria Hansen

It’s a campaign promise made during an ad last fall as he treaded water in the Atlantic Ocean.  Now Congressman Joe Cunningham is swimming hard against the powerful currents of Washington, as he tries to make good and protect the South Carolina coast from offshore drilling.

The first time politician announced Tuesday he will introduce the, "Coastal Economies Protection Act", as soon as he gets back to Washington, to prevent opening the Atlantic and Gulf Coast to drilling and seismic air gun blasting. 

The inside of David Jones' practice balls are ribbed to give them strength.  The two halves are fused together by friction.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

David Jones and his son Brantley are baseball fans.  Brantley played as a youngster, and was so enthusiastic about batting practice that his older brother, who didn’t like the game, was forced by circumstance to invent a pitching machine so he wouldn’t have to pitch to his brother for hours every day.  That machine, created as a school science project when he was only 11, and Brantley just 9, became the foundation for a business. 

A portrait of Judge J. Waities Waring hangs in the courthouse that bears his name.
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

When Charleston journalist Brian Hicks first heard the story of U.S. District Judge Julius Waties Waring, he knew what he must do; write a book about it.  He says the son of a Confederate soldier became an unlikely civil rights "hero," and that's a word Hicks doesn't often use. Yet, Waring's name is still fairly unfamiliar, and he was an eighth generation Charlestonian.

Wynton Marsalis Jazzes Up the Holidays

Nov 28, 2018
Wynton Marsalis plays holiday songs with the jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra
Frank Stewart for Jazz at Lincoln Center

Ask Wynton Marsalis to name his favorite holiday song and he might tell you, “The Christmas Song” by Mel Torme.  Then he’ll likely explain it’s personal.  When Marsalis first moved to New York, he played in a show with Torme.  He was 18 years-old.

“The contractor thought I was only a classical trumpet player,” Marsalis recalled.  “He said this boy can’t play.  I don’t know why he’s playing this gig, and Mel heard me play and said, this boy can play.  Leave him alone.”

Charleston School Helps Women Sail the Seas of Life

Nov 2, 2018
Tall ship "Liberty Clipper" arrives at the Charleston Maritime Center
Victoria Hansen

Just leaving their cell phones behind for a week might seem tough enough, but 17 teenagers from Ashley Hall in Charleston, a private school for girls, spent a week at sea hoisting sails and navigating by stars aboard the tall ship, “Liberty Clipper”. Most had never sailed before. The trip is part of the school’s annual Offshore Leadership Program.

Literary Classic "Frankenstein" Turns 200

Oct 30, 2018
A detail from the frontispiece of the 1831 edition. Steel engraving (993 x 71mm) to the revised edition of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, published by Colburn and Bentley, London 1831.
Theodore Von Holst (1810-1844) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Halloween brings out the ghoul and monster in both kids and adults, and a perennial favorite is Mary Shelley's ground-breaking character, Frankenstein.  Acknowledged as the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein has hit another milestone this year: first published in 1818, it turns 200, and has enjoyed popularity virtually from the moment of its first printing.  University of South Carolina English professor and Shelley expert Paula Feldman said the story speaks to the mysterious fears of our nature, and thus has remained popular through the centuries.  She revealed that the inspiration

Early childhood expert and author Helle Heckmann talks to educators and community members at an education summit in Florence
Victoria Hansen

A conference thousands of miles away in California has inspired an early childhood education public awareness campaign in Florence.  That’s where district one teachers heard a woman from Denmark talk about serving children’s needs so they are better able to learn and grow.  The speaker was author and early childhood education expert Helle Heckmann.

Coming Home to Conway after the Flood

Oct 5, 2018
Bill and Diane Parker sit outside their flood ravaged home in Conway.
Victoria Hansen

Two weeks after the president visited their neighborhood in Conway, Bill and Diane Parker sit on a sofa in their front yard, surrounded by furniture.  They’ve just come home for the first time since Hurricane Florence’s flood waters ravaged their Sherwood community, east of downtown.  The damage is worse than they imagined.

“I would lie in bed at night and think about each room,” Diane Parker said.  “What did I leave?  What’s there that is possibly going to be ruined”.

Saying Goodbye to Two Iconic Radio Series

Sep 26, 2018
Ray Magliozzi, the late Tom Magliozzi, and the late Marian McPartland.
Car Talk/NPR, SC Public Radio

This month two of the longest running, most iconic public radio series end their runs on South Carolina Public Radio: Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz and Car Talk.

There are more than 400 different license plate designs for autos in South Carolina.  They range from the standard "While I Breathe I Hope" tags to include colleges, veterans, Parrotheads and vanity plates like this one.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Most, if not all, states offer a variety of license tags for automobiles. South Carolina offers more than 400, many to support causes or organizations, from colleges to gold star families, or wildlife and habitats, from trees to turkeys and elk. Some are offered out of support and respect, such as veterans or POWs. Some are more whimsical features of South Carolina culture, like the shag dance, or even Parrotheads, the fanatical followers of Jimmy Buffett.

The Future of Crab Bank; A Coastal Bird Sanctuary

Jul 24, 2018
The remnants of Crab Bank at the entrance of Mount Pleasant's Shem Creek
David Quick

Chris Crolley wears a long, grey, shirt only those who work in the sun instinctively know to wear.  His blue eyes reflect some of the button-up’s hue, as he looks out beneath his worn, woven hat with a small, winged pin.  He knows what makes tourists and locals alike go “ahhh”.  He’s been giving tours of Mount Pleasant’s Shem Creek for 30 years.

USC sleep specialist Dr. Antoinette Rutherford says there's a cure for everyone who snores - it's just a matter of finding the right method for each individual.
Nick Wilkes [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

Snoring can ruin the sleep of millions of South Carolinians, and it doesn’t do the snorer any good, either.  Sleep expert Dr. Robert Puchalski says vibrations in the throat cause snoring, and by the passing of air through a tight space in the upper airway, in the way that wind instruments create sound.  At least half of people snore, according to USC sleep specialist Dr.

hoto from the University of South Carolina's Motion Image Research Collection.
Photo from the University of South Carolina's Motion Image Research Collection.

At the University of South Carolina, the Moving Image Research Collection has established a reputation as one of the top film archives in the country. Curator Greg Wilsbacher says Newsfilm Collections at USC has received some notable donations over the years—including footage from the United States Marine Corps. But it all started with a donation in 1980 from the Fox Corporation, containing countless hours of newsreels and outtakes from the turn of the 20th Century.

If a black cat crosses your path on Friday the 13th - or any other day - don't worry, says USC sociology professor Barry Markovsky. There is no truth to any superstitions about Friday the 13th, black cats or any other traditional "bad luck" myths.
Pauline Havard [CC0 1.0] via Pixabay

Of the various superstitions people are subject to, one only manifests itself up to three times a year: Friday the 13th.

Students Create Computer Games and Apps at Girls Go for IT Camp

Jun 29, 2018
Instructor Jaya Gantt, a recent graduate of USC, teaches 6th-grader Kenney Williams and other students at Girls Go for I.T. camp.
Laura Hunsberger

During the last two weeks of June, the University of South Carolina's School of Earth, Ocean and Environment was home to Girls Go for I.T., a camp for middle school-age girls who are interested in learning about computer science and programming. South Carolina Public Radio's Laura Hunsberger and Clayton Sears went to USC's campus to see what the girls are creating and to talk with the professors who started the program, Dr.

The first annual Lizardman Festival and Comic Con was  held June 8-10 at the S.C. Cotton Museum in Bishopville.
Olivia Aldridge/SC Public Radio

The tale goes something like this: a young man gets a flat tire late one night in 1988 while driving near Scape Ore Swamp, and gets out of his car to change it. Then, from the shadows emerges a creature that’s green, wet, seven feet tall, with three fingers, red eyes and scales. As the young man scrambles to drive away, the creature viciously attacks his car.

Patty Lozon, Amanda Lozon, and Bill Lozon, Columbia 2016
StoryCorps

This edition of Narrative features an interview from StoryCorps, an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. At the StoryCorps mobile booth in Columbia in 2016, Amanda Lozon spoke with her parents, Patty and Bill Lozon. Also her grandparents, Patty and Bill adopted Amanda and raised her from age twelve. Here, Patty and Bill tell Amanda what the experience was like.

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