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The Good Samaritan-Waverly Hospital has been closed since 1973. The building is now owned by Allen University and is scheduled for a massive renovation and projected ribbon cutting in the Fall of 2020.
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

In 1944, Columbia resident and civil rights activist Modjeska Monteith Simkins was put in charge of raising money for the construction of a new hospital to primarily serve the African American population of the Midlands. While completing this task, she wrote:

“It is our grand privilege and our duty; yours and mine; to help build and equip ourselves with a modern hospital owned and operated by Negroes.”

Symposium Examines Women's Roles During World War I

Apr 9, 2019
From The Electrical Experimenter, October, 1916. The original caption reads: "Here Are Some of the Patriotic Young Women Studying Radio-telegraphy At One of the Summer Preparedness Camps."
Public Domain

Lander University recented hosted a symposium on World War I, which ended just over a century ago.  The symposium drew scholars and authors primarily from the Southeast to discuss various aspects of the war, which then was known as "The Great War."  One aspect covered by a panel of experts examined the role of women during the war.

Gavin Jackson speaks with Russ McKinney (l) and Jeffrey Collins (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, April 8, 2019.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

The end of the legislative session is one month away, which means this week is "crossover week." That's an insider way of saying if a bill hasn't been passed out of its originating chamber -- either the State House or Senate -- by the end of the day Wednesday, that legislation is not likely to go anywhere this year without a supermajority vote.

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson discusses a number of the bills still up in the air (including controversial ones dealing with medical marijuana, outlawing plastic bags, and abortion) with the Associated Press' Jeffrey Collins and South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney.

UPDATE 3 PM MONDAY

A file photo of the late Sen. Ernest "Fritz" Hollings.
U.S. Congress

Former S.C. Governor and U.S. Senator Ernest "Fritz" Hollings died on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at the age of 97.  A Democrat, he held elective office for over fifty years.

South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney has this look back at Hollings's life and political career.

Fewer hurricanes are expected this year than the last two seasons, according to renowned researcher Dr. Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University. However, both of those seasons far outperformed expectations.

Even Phil doesn't have much confidence in his forecast this time of year.

“So our skill in April is modest, and that's because the hurricane season doesn't start until June and then doesn't ramp up until August. So obviously there's a lot that could change in the atmosphere and ocean,” he says.

The South Carolina State House
File

This year’s attempt by pro-life members of the state legislature to pass restrictions on abortions is centered in the House of Representatives.  A bill that would ban almost all abortions if a fetal heartbeat is detected in a woman passed the House Judiciary Committee this week on a mostly party line vote. Experts say a fetal heartbeat can typically be detected around the sixth week of pregnancy.

File photo of an L.E.D. lightbulb.
Shawn Harquail [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

When the “light emitting diode,” or “LED” light was first developed, it was primarily used as an indicator light in lab equipment. But as the low energy consumption of LEDs was observed, and costs for manufacturing LEDs went down, the new lighting technology found its way into the hands of consumers. Users of the more modern light bulbs not only began to see lower power bills, but also noticed how rarely they needed to replace their LED bulbs.

Gavin Jackson with Jamie Lovegrove (l) and Meg Kinnard (r) at Seminar Brewing in Florence, SC, on Thursday, March 28, 2019.
Aimee Crouch/SCETV

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, recorded live at Seminar Brewing in Florence, SC, host Gavin Jackson gets an update about the 2020 election from the Associated Press' Meg Kinnard and the Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove. The three look at the current slate of Democratic presidential hopefuls visiting the Palmetto State as they compete for their party's nomination.

Then, South Carolina Public Radio's own Russ McKinney quizzes Gavin and the audience about Florence history.

Diana Krall was one of the many guests Marian McPartland welcomed to Piano Jazz over its long run.
SCETV

For many years, jazz great Marian McPartland welcomed some of the biggest names in - and out of - jazz to her NPR program, Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz.  March 20, on the 101st anniversary of her  birth, an evening of McPartland's music inaugurated a new music series, Live in the Lobby, offered by Columbia's Koger Center for the Arts.  

The South Carolina State House
File

S.C. lawmakers had hoped to keep the decks at the Statehouse clear this legislative session to be able to focus on improving the state’s public school system.  A major education bill has already been approved by the House.

But matters regarding the state’s energy future are generating a lot of attention. 

Aside from the enormous question of whether or not the state should sell Santee Cooper, the debt-plagued state owned utility, the future of solar energy in the state is being debated. 

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of March 28, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes you to recent campaign stops by Democractic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke and potential candidate South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Pondering Plastic - Wildlife, Bans and Trash

Mar 26, 2019
Voldemort, a loggerhead being treated at the South Carolina Aquarium's Sea Turtle Hospital
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

He weighs less than five pounds, but Zazu had big belly problems when he was rescued off the Isle of Palms coast nearly three months ago.  The tiny, green sea turtle had eaten plastic, all kinds of plastic; part of a balloon, clear sheets of plastic and material from a grocery bag. 

The juvenile  turtle is the 23rd patient admitted to the South Carolina Aquarium’s sea turtle hospital because of sea debris.  He swims in a private tank next to 17 others now in recovery, including a 260 pound loggerhead named Voldemort who got caught up in crab traps nearly a year ago.

The Post and Courier

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with the Post and Courier's Tony Bartelme about the paper's "Above The Law" special investigation into questionable conduct by several South Carolina sheriffs. Bartelme and fellow reporter Joe Cranney sifted through more than 5,000 pages of bank statements, receipts, lawsuits, campaign filings, and IRS records related to the state's sheriffs, discovering extravagant spending, criminal charges, and questions about who is overseeing these officials sworn to uphold the law.

Santee Cooper headquarters sign.
Santee Cooper

After months of discussion about Santee Cooper, the SC General Assembly this week took the first official actions that could lead to the eventual sale of the state-owned utility.

The State House of Representatives and Senate are considering Joint Resolutions that would begin a process to sell Santee Cooper which is burdened by an enormous debt incurred from the collapse of the giant V.C. Summer Nuclear Project in 2017. 

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