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Sen. Lindsey Graham speaks at a campaign event for state Rep. Nancy Mace in North Charleston on September 21, 2020.
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 22, 2020, features: a look at how you can vote absentee in the November 3 election; the latest from Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on the future of the Supreme Court nomination process he will oversee; comments from U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams from his recent visit to Columbia; and more.

Shortage of Coins Brought On by COVID Pandemic

Sep 15, 2020
COVID-19 has had many affects on society, some unexpected.  One of these is a shortage of coins.
gaustin11 via Pixabay

COVID-19 has caused many disruptions in people's daily lives, and one of the unexpected obstacles facing businesses around the state and country - as if there weren't enough - is a shortage of coins.

African American women and men carry signs calling for equal rights in 1963 more than 40 years after the 19th ammendent was passed giving women the right to vote.  But that right did not extend to all women or men.
Library of Congress

The 19th amendment promised women the right to vote would not be denied because of gender.  But it was an empty promise for women with dark skin.

"It's an historical legacy that can't be ignored because it's inconvenient," says Sandra Slater.  She's an associate history professor at the College of Charleston and the director of the school's Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World Program.

Slater has been talking a lot about the suffragist movement this year as part of the centennial celebration of the passage of the 19th amendment.

Army Identifies Soldier Found Dead at Fort Jackson

Sep 14, 2020

Sunday, Army officials identified the basic combat training soldier who was found dead in his barracks at Fort Jackson on September 12.

29-year old Pvt. Michael Wise from Wisconsin was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment.

Saturday, officials announced a 48-hour training stand down.

"This is a difficult time for everyone who knew Michael and we continue to provide comfort to his teammates," said Fort Jackson Commander Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. "Chaplains and other medical professionals are helping those in need."

Acting director of DHEC Marshall Taylor speaks at a press conference on September 10, 2020.
SCETV

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 12, 2020, features: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on how the offshore drilling moratorium including South Carolina came about; Gov. Henry McMaster outlines how he would like to spend phase II CARES Act money that the state legislature will decide next week; state health officials project how a COVID-19 vaccine would be implemented in South Carolina; and more. 

File photo of the S.C. Senate in session
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

The state legislature will return to Columbia next week to once again consider what to do about next year’s operating budget.  Uncertainty about the economy and how much state tax revenue it will generate has lawmakers in a quandary.

Florence Senator Hugh Leatherman, the veteran chairman of the powerful Senate Finance committee said this week that when it comes to the economic uncertainty being caused by the pandemic it’s the most uncertain of times he has ever seen.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

The mental health crisis among healthcare workers in the pandemic is, in large part, one of moral crisis.  

We’ve reported on the emotional toll COVID-19 can take on frontline healthcare workers. But what about the toll it’s taking on professionals at the further reaches of the healthcare continuum?

State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman announces an additional investment in datacasting technology with South Carolina ETV on September 9, 2020.
SCETV

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 10, 2020, we look at datacasting to help keep students in South Carolina connected remotely to school even without broadband, hear about how the pandemic could affect the future of land development, get an update on telehealth advancements, and more.

The latest South Carolina COVID-19 case numbers, as of September 4, 2020.
SC DHEC

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 5, 2020, we examine Facebook's aproach to limiting the spread of disinformation ahead of the November 3 election, discuss whether the stock market is indicative of the greater economy, speak with medical professionals about public trust of a potential coronavirus vaccine, and more.

Feliphe Schiarolli / Unsplash

One of the upsides to having children back in a physical classroom is that the state's child protective services workers can talk to kids again. A lot of them are dealing with abuse or neglect and it's easier to catch up with several of them when they're in one place, away from the people abusing and neglecting them.

Dr. Lommel preparing for a patient visit via Telehealth.
J.T. Hydrick

On March 6, 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act. While it may not have garnered as much attention as the CARES act, its impact should not be overlooked.

Sen. Dick Harpootlian (D-Columbia) speaks from the well of the South Carolina Senate on September 2, 2020.
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 3, 2020, we look at how state lawmakers are working to safeguard the November 3 election, hear from state budget officials about how much money is available and how that funding may be used, break down new visitation guidelines announced by Gov. Henry McMaster this week for nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and more.

Numerous pharmaceutical manufacturers are working hard to develop a vaccine for COVID-19.  Once that's done, the big question to be answered is, will people take it?
Arek Socha via Pixabay

Drug companies have been working furiously to produce a vaccine for COVID-19, with hopes for one late this year or early 2021.  As development gets nearer, an important question has arisen among some medical professionals:  once the vaccine has been produced, will people trust it enough to take it?

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

One could make much of the timing of Chef Rob Masone’s next big food venture, seeing that it just happens to intersect with a moment that’s brought us both a pandemic and a major conversation about the meaning and breadth of race and racism in the United States.

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 1, 2020, we discuss the Palmetto State’s current economic situation, break down the additional money lawmakers will have for upcoming budget negotiations, continue our look at the mental health of medical professionals on the frontline, and more.

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