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How the Golf Industry Drives South Carolina's Economy

Jun 19, 2019
File photo, close-up of golf ball and golf club head.
File photo: HeungSoon/Pixabay

The golf industry is big business for the state of South Carolina, generating $2.59 billion in sales for the state in 2018.

The sport generated 31,434 jobs, $857 million in wages and income, and $309 million in federal, state, and local taxes, according to an economic impact study created by the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism.

Ham radio operator Warren Rickey calls amateur operators statewide in SC HEART's weekly training exercise.  The group was founded to provide emergency communications when a disaster destroys phone and Internet capabilities.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

When a disaster strikes, communications may become spotty or even gone completely.  Cell phone towers may be down, land lines even disrupted, and if the Internet is offline, there goes email.  Keeping communications open for hospitals and other health care facilities during these types of crises are what amateur radio operators - or "hams" - train for once a week, as members of the South Carolina Healthcare Emergency Amateur Radio Team, or SC HEART for short.

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Post and Courier's Caitlin Byrd to discuss the latest South Carolina 2020 poll numbers and recap the recent Black Economic Alliance forum in Charleston. They also preview two major political events this week: Congressman Jim Clyburn's annual fish fry, which 22 of the 23 Democratic presidential candidates are expected to attend, and the state Democratic Party Convention.

In the city where nearly half of all enslaved Africans were brought to this nation, Spoleto Festival USA will unveil a new opera based on the life of an African-Muslim slave.  His autobiography is believed to be the only surviving, unedited story written in Arabic in the United States.

Omar Ibn Said came to Charleston through Gadsden’s Wharf in 1807 and was sold as a slave.  He escaped his Charleston owner and fled to North Carolina where he was recaptured, jailed and resold.  He penned his autobiography in 1831.  His story, lost for decades and eventually held in private collections, was acquired by the Library of Congress two years ago.  It was recently translated into English.

Gavin Jackson (l) speaks with Kirk Brown and Nikie Mayo (r) in the Greenville News offices.
Sean Scott/SCETV

On this edition of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with Greenville News reporters Nikie Mayo and Kirk Brown about their recent coverage on South Carolina prisons. Mayo and Brown have been focusing on the disciplinary action taken against hundreds of corrections officers and other factors surrounding the 2018 riot at Lee Correctional Institution. The investigation into the incident, which left seven inmates dead, is ongoing and no one has been charged.

Selecting the Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra

Jun 7, 2019
Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra members carry their insturments in downtown Charleston
Victoria Hansen

They are sure signs of Spoleto in downtown Charleston; instrument toting musicians and scorching heat.  Among the jostling violin cases, is Shannon Fitzhenry.  She’s back for her second year with the annual Spoleto Festival USA Orchestra, one of 92 musicians chosen to play.

“The goal is to get up in time to warm up before rehearsal,” she laughs.  The Charleston native grew up with Spoleto, but admits she didn't fully appreciate it until she  moved away to study music at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, Maryland.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

That the NFL’s Carolina Panthers would eventually move the team’s practice facility and operations out of Charlotte and south of the border to Rock Hill was really just a matter of when the South Carolina Legislature would greenlight a set of tax breaks (worth somewhere between $115 and $120 million, by most estimates) that would allow the team to set up shop in York County. And when Panthers would officially say they were coming.

On June 5, the Panthers, the state, and City of Rock Hill made the official announcement that the team will be moving in over the next couple years.

Rock Hill Unveils All-Electric Bus Fleet

Jun 6, 2019
Rock Hill's free My Ride bus fleet boasts zero emissions. My Ride is funded mainly through the a combination of FTA funds, a local match from the city's general fund, and partners.
Scott Morgan/SC Public Radio

When Rock Hill set out to launch its first full-scale bus system, it wanted to try something different. Well, all the rides on the MyRide system will be free and all seven buses in the fleet will be 100 percent electric. The really different part, though, is that no one’s ever started out this way before.

Sid Scott/What Girls Are Made Of

On this final episode of Spoleto Backstage for 2019, host Adam Parker speaks with Cora Bissett, writer and star, and Orla O'Loughlin, director, of the play "What Dreams Are Made Of." Based on Bissett's life story, the production follows a Scottish schoolgirl's rise to rock and roll stardorm and her rollercoaster journey along the way.

Down the ramp of a Coast Guard Landing barge Yankee soldiers storm toward the beach-sweeping fire of Nazi defenders in the D-Day Invasion of the French Coast. Troops ahead may be seen lying flat under the deadly machine gun resistance of the Germans.
National Archives

75 years ago - June 6, 1944 - 156,000 Allied troops on nearly 7000 ships and landing craft and supported by 11,590 planes dropping both bombs and paratroopers, landed on the beaches of Normandy, France.  The top-secret invasion of Europe was code-named Operation Overlord, but is more broadly known the world over as D-Day.  That day began the battle to free the continent from the grip of Nazi Germany.  

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of June 6, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes you to recent campaign stops by Democratic presidential hopefuls Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Rep. Seth Coulton (D-Mass.).

Pianist David Virelles and percussionist Roman Diaz teach a class at the Charleston Jazz Academy
Victoria Hansen

Scribbling notes on a dry erase board just won't do.  So David Virelles plays them instead, on a piano.  The Cuban composer and pianist is teaching a masters class at the Charleston Jazz Academy in North Charleston, as part of the Spoleto arts festival's community outreach program.

In just a couple of hours, he's performing too.

"I hope the students walk away with what it takes to play music," Virelles says.  "It takes a lot of discipline, perseverance and love.  You have to be passionate about it and really spend time to be any good."

Tina Davis, GIS specialist, and Mike Lewis, recovery specialist, take in some training at the York County OEM, to better know how to handle an emergency.
Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Emergency management coordinators in South Carolina have a lot to think about. A lot to think about.

On any given day, a normally quiet command center, like the one deep in the ground below Greenville City Hall, could fill up with representatives from a whole pile of agencies in a matter of minutes.

“County Public Works, the American Red Cross, the Department of Social Services, DHEC, law

Spoleto Festival USA

On this edition of Spoleto Backstage, host Adam Parker chats with Rob Taylor, director of Choral Activities at the College of Charleston, artistic director of the Taylor Festival Choir, and director of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Chorus and Chamber Singers, about his series of choral concerts as part of Piccolo Spoleto Festival 2019.

Sonatas and Soundscapes host Bradley Fuller speaks with Joe Miller, director of Choral Acivitives for Spoleto Festival USA and director of the Westminster Choir, about that group's performances at this year's festival.

Jennifer Berry Hawes/St. Martin's Publishing Group

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning Post and Courier reporter Jennifer Berry Hawes about her book, "Grace Will Lead Us Home: The Charleston Massacre and the Hard, Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness." Hawes chronicles the tragic shooting of nine parishioners at the Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston and its aftermath through pointed, detailed accounts of the victims and their familes.

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