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Gov. Niki Haley and response team, Thu, Oct 6, 2016.
Russ McKinney / SC Public Radio

Gov. Nikki Haley Announces Evacuation Of Additional Areas In Jasper and Colleton Counties, Zone B

Residents and visitors in Zone B of Jasper and Colleton Counties should begin evacuating effective immediately TODAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6.  This evacuation is in addition to the previous evacuation for the areas of Jasper and Colleton Counties in Zone A, which went into effect yesterday, October 5.

Gov. Haley: 175 Thousand Evacuated. That is Not Enough

Oct 6, 2016
Gov. Niki Haley and response team, Thu, Oct 6, 2016.
Russ McKinney / SC Public Radio

  Governor Adds Horry and Georgetown Counties to Evacuation Orders

Thursday morning, Gov. Haley said not enough coastal residents have evacuated ahead of Hurricane Matthew. Officials were expecting 250,000 people to move away from the cost, but with only 175,000 people gone, more residents need to leave, she said.

All South Carolina shellfish beds will be closed at 12:00 p.m. on Friday, October 7, 2016 in advance of Hurricane Matthew. This precautionary action is being taken because of the likelihood of the occurrence of heavy rainfall and storm water runoff as a result of the storm.

“All oyster, clam and mussel harvest areas will be closed on Friday at noon and remain closed until evaluated and re-opened by the Department,” said Mike Pearson, manager of DHEC’s Shellfish Sanitation Program. “Individual areas will be opened as soon as conditions are acceptable for the harvest of shellfish.”

Owners and operators of reservoirs in areas potentially impacted by rain and winds from Hurricane Matthew should check their dams and take appropriate steps to safely lower the water levels today and through the next several days in preparation for the storm, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

Emergency Shelters Open

Oct 5, 2016

The South Carolina Response Team today announced the opening of shelters across the state for residents and visitors who are evacuating from coastal areas as Hurricane Matthew approaches. Shelters began opening on Wednesday, October 5, and as of 5 PM there are 32 shelters open.

Charleston County Hurricane Matthew Update

Oct 5, 2016

Charleston County Government announces the following shelters are now open:

  • North Charleston High School, 1087 E Montague Ave, North Charleston, SC 29405
  • Stall High School, 3625 Ashley Phosphate Rd, North Charleston, SC 29418
  • A.C. Corcoran Elementary, 8585 Vistavia Rd, North Charleston, SC 29406
  • Midland Park Primary, 2415 Midland Park Road, North Charleston, SC 29406
  • Ladson Elementary, 3321 Ladson Rd, Ladson, SC 29456
  • Edmund A. Burns Elementary, 3750 Dorchester Road, North Charleston, SC 29405 (Pet / Pet Owner Shelter)

Gov. Nikki Haley and other state officials during Tuesday press conference.
Thelisha Eaddy / SC Public Radio

As Hurricane Matthew threatens the southeastern United States, Governor Nikki Haley today ordered an evacuation of coastal areas in and around Charleston and Beaufort, South Carolina  

Residents and visitors in Charleston and Beaufort Counties should begin evacuating no later than 3:00 PM TODAY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5.  Residents and visitors in certain parts of bordering coastal counties – Berkeley, Colleton, Dorchester and Jasper Counties – should begin evacuating no later than 3:00 PM TODAY, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5.

Cooper McKim / SC Public Radio

Gov. Nikki Haley announced updated evacuation routes for coastal communities in preparation for Hurricane Matthew.

"The greater Charleston County area and greater Beaufort County area will go on with the evacuation at 3 o' clock. That will include the lane reversal of I-26."

LISTEN: Entire 9AM press conference

Hundreds of volunteers with the nonprofit Eight Days of Hope were expected in Williamsburg and Georgetown Counties Saturday. The group was scheduled to start rebuilding 150 homes damaged in last year’s flood. President Stephen Tybor is now asking some of those volunteers to delay their arrival.

"We ask those volunteers that are going to come in tomorrow on Saturday, to delay that arrival to Sunday Afternoon."

Tybor said teams that are already in the area will temporarily shift their focus to post-storm cleanup.

South Carolina Emergency Management Division logo
SCEMD

COLUMBIA, S.C. - Governor Nikki Haley today issued an executive order declaring a State of Emergency and asked residents to prepare for a potential evacuation of the South Carolina coast in advance of any impact from Hurricane Matthew.

As state officials continue to monitor weather conditions, the governor will update residents about preparations for Hurricane Matthew, including the need for an evacuation of coastal areas, during a news conference tomorrow, Wednesday, October 5, at 9:00 AM.

Counselling
lisafx/123RF Stock Photo

On average, about two people die by suicide each day in South Carolina, which is more than twice the state’s homicide rate.   With its “Out of the Darkness” walks statewide in October and November, the S.C.

Only days after the flood, Columbia's Gills Creek was approaching normal level, but its rage left its marks, both on the vegetation pictured here, and on its many victims.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Rain can be a painful reminder to some people of the great losses suffered a year ago in South Carolina’s historic floods.  According to USC School of Social Work Assistant Professor Patrice Penney, the anniversary of a traumatic event such as the floods can cause fear, anxiety and other symptoms in survivors. And psychologist Richard Kagan tells us that these renewed feelings at the anniversary are perfectly normal behavior, but  William Wells of the S.C. Dept.

DNR: White Shrimp Season As High As Predicted

Sep 30, 2016
Alexandra Olgin

The spring 2016 white roe shrimp season in South Carolina was the best in 37 years. The state natural resources department reports catches of shrimp at testing sites in August were more 200 percent higher than the decade average.

In April, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources marine scientist Steve Arnott attributed the projected successful season to weather conditions. He said the influx of freshwater from 2015 flooding moved many of the crustaceans out of the marshes and into the waters where the shrimp boats are.

Low Prices Make Flood Recovery Tough For Farmers

Sep 30, 2016
Alexandra Olgin

Farmer Jamie Burgess has a lot riding on this harvest.

“Corn so far is doing good,” he said from the drivers seat of his combine. “If we can just get a good price we’ll be all right.”  

Last year, most of Burgess’ crops were drowned by record rainfall. The South Carolina agriculture department estimates farmers lost 75 percent of the money they were expecting to make off of crops in 2015.  

Alexandra Olgin

The future of a South Carolina hospital damaged by water a year ago is uncertain. The Williamsburg Regional Hospital in Kingstree was damaged by heavy rains last October and it  is still waiting to hear if it will get funding to repair or build a new facility.

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