SC From A to Z

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781). Minister. A native of Switzerland, Zubly was ordained in London’s German Reformed Church in 1744. He was in South Carolina in the 1740s where he traveled among German communities in the lowcountry and among the German Lutheran community in Orangeburg. Known for his erudition, Zubly occasionally lectured at the Independent Meeting House in Charleston. In 1760, he moved to Savannah. He represented Georgia in the Continental Congress. Although he appreciated colonial opposition to British imperial policy, he opposed moves toward independence.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"Y" is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict between the colony of Carolina and its trade partners the Yamassee.  Unscrupulous Indian traders cheated and mistreated the Native Americans. On Good Friday 1715, the Yamassees struck. They killed the traders in their midst and launched attacks against coastal plantations. Despite its name, the Yamassee War also involved the Cherokees, the Creeks, the Choctaws, the Santees, and the Waccamaws in a far-ranging rebellion from the Savannah River to Charleston.

"X" is for XYZ Affair

Jul 28, 2020
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"X" is for XYZ Affair. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was one of three Americans sent to France to try to improve diplomatic relations. The French foreign minister was originally cordial to the three men, but refused to negotiate with them in any official capacity. Instead, he sent unofficial envoys to meet with the Americans. They made it perfectly clear that the French government expected a bribe in return for improved relations. Pinckney is claimed to have responded to the bribery demands with “No! No!

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

“W” is for Waccamaw River. The Waccamaw River, named for the Waccamaw Indian nation, begins in North Carolina. The river runs parallel to the coast through Horry and Georgetown Counties—never straying more than fifteen miles from the Atlantic Ocean. In Horry County the river runs through the county seat of Conway. The Waccamaw is navigable from Georgetown to Conway, but the upper reaches become shallow and swampy.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for Abbeville County (508 square miles; 2010 population 25,328). Abbeville County was one of the six counties created in 1785 out of Ninety Six District. Its border to the north was the pre-Revolutionary War Indian boundary line. The Savannah and Saluda Rivers marked its eastern and western boundaries. Abbeville lost much of its area to Greenwood County in 1897 and gave up further territory in 1916 to McCormick County. Beginning in the 1760s, settlers from Virginia established farms in the area known as the Long Canes.