SC From A to Z

From Hilton Head to Caesars Head, and from the Lords Proprietors to Hootie and the Blowfish, historian Walter Edgar mines the riches of the South Carolina Encyclopedia to bring you South Carolina from A to Z.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"N" is for Nairne, Thomas (d. 1715). Indian agent. Nairne, a Scot, was in South Carolina by 1695. By the early 1700s Nairne led Indian raids against Spanish Florida. The Commons House, in 1707, established the Board of Indian Commissioners to regulate The Indian trade. The act created the office of Indian agent and Nairne was the colony’s first official one. He traveled across the Southeast dealing with tribes as far west as the Mississippi River. He lost his post in1708 because he arrested the governor’s son-in-law for illegal trading.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"M" is for Mabry, George Lawrence, Jr. (1917-1990). Soldier, Medal of Honor recipient. After graduating from Presbyterian College, Mabry entered the Army and was assigned to the Fourth Division. His first action under enemy fire was at Normandy on D-Day when he led his company into the first wave at Utah Beach. By the time he had fought his way across France he had earned promotion to battalion commander. In the fall of 1944 Mabry and his divisions took part in the bloody campaign to take the Huertegen Forest in western Germany.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"L" is for Lady of Cofitachiqui. The leader of a powerful chiefdom, the “Lady of Cofitachiqui encountered Hernando de Soto and his conquistadors in 1540 as they passed through her territory (probably near the modern town of Camden). Spanish narratives portray the encounter as a chivalrous and romantic one, in which the Lady formed a pact of friendship and peace with de Soto by offering him a magnificent strand of pearls from around her neck and graciously supplying provisions The reality was quite different as the Spaniards threatened the Lady and her family.

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"K" is for Kellogg, Clara Louise (1842-1916). Opera singer. Born in Sumter, Kellogg’s family moved to Connecticut when she was a child. After completing her education at Ashland Seminary and Musical Institute, she made her musical debut in 1861at the Academy of Music in New York. During the 1870s Kellogg toured extensively throughout Europe and North America. She was one of the first American operatic singers to gain an international reputation.

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"J" is for Jackson, Andrew (1767-1845). Soldier, U.S. senator, president of the United States. Jackson was born in the Waxhaw settlement of Lancaster District. He was an active partisan fighter during the Revolutionary War. After the war he moved to North Carolina and then to Tennessee. Very quickly, he entered politics representing Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. During the War of 1812, he led the successful defense of New Orleans and became a national hero. In 1824, he won the popular vote, but lost the election to John Quincy Adams.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"I" is for Indian Affairs Commission. The Lords Proprietors established the first Indian Affairs Commission in 1680 with the expectation that it would help promote peace between the local Indians and the settlers. During the colonial period—up to 1763 when the British government assumed control over Indian affairs in all colonies—the commission continued to function. However, it appears that the royal governor wielded most of the authority. After the Revolutionary War, control over Indian affairs passed to the United State government.

"H" is for H.L. Hunley

Dec 30, 2019
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"H" is for H.L. Hunley. On the night of February 17, 1864, the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley attacked and sank the USS Housatonic about four miles off Sullivan’s Island. This was the first successful sinking of an enemy ship by submersible in the history of the world. Constructed in Mobile, Alabama, and named for one of its owners, the iron vessel was forty feet long, five feet tall, and four feet wide. It was transported to Charleston with the hopes that it would help break the Union naval blockade of the port.

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"E" is for Edisto Island [Charleston County; population 1, 558]. Located between the mouths of the North and South Edisto Rivers, Edisto is a sea island of approximately sixty-eight square miles. It is shielded from the Atlantic by Edisto Beach, a barrier island. In the sixteenth century, Spanish settlers established a short-lived Jesuit mission here.  In the 1670s, the Edisto Indians deeded the island to English settlers. Indigo was introduced in the 1740s.

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"D" is for Daufuskie Island. Daufuskie, is a sea island near the mouth of the Savannah River at the southern tip of Beaufort County. Eight miles square, the island is bordered by salt marshes and oyster beds that are affected daily by six-to-eight foot tides. Live oaks, palmettos, and pines thrive in the semi-tropical climate. Native American groups inhabited the island until after the Yamassee War. Indigo and sea island cotton dominated the pre-Civil War economy. Because of the island's geographic isolation, native islanders have maintained many of their Gullah traditions.

"B" is for Banov, Leon

Dec 18, 2019
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"C" is for Camp Meetings. These outdoor services of worship held for a week or longer were characterized by the encampment of the participants. Camp meetings were not only religious in nature, but were also major social events in a predominantly rural culture. Eventually a brush arbor, wagons, and tents were replaced by a central tabernacle for worship and wooden structures for family groups [still known as “tents”].

"B" is for Banov, Leon

Dec 17, 2019
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"B" is for Banov, Leon [1888-1971]. Physician. Public Health Official. Born in Poland, Banov immigrated to Charleston at the age of eight. He received his pharmacy degree from the Medical College of South Carolina and returned to the College and obtained his M.D. In 1920 he was appointed Charleston County's first public health officer and instituted routine medical examinations of schoolchildren, enforced existing laws requiring smallpox vaccinations, and advocated vaccination against typhoid.

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"A" is for African Theological Archministry, Inc. [Oyotunji Village]. In 1973 a group of African Americans established an independent Yoruba kingdom at Sheldon, fourteen miles from Beaufort. The Kingdom of Oyotunji Village is headed by Oba [or King] Efuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I. Oyotunji means “Oya again awakes” or “Oya rises again.” Oya was an ancient city-state kingdom in Yorubaland located in present day Nigeria, Togo, Benin, and Ghana.

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"S" is for Sullivan's Island, Battle of (June 28, 1776). The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first major patriot victory in the Revolutionary War. In February 1776, after British plans to capture Charleston were revealed, South Carolina patriots began construction of a palmetto log and sand fort on Sullivan’s Island. At 11:30 a.m. on June 28th the British fleet began a daylong bombardment. The fort withstood the pounding from the heavy British guns. The patriots returned fire and their solid shot and shells tore into the wooden ships.

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"S" is for Swansea Veneer and Basket Works. Founded in 1914 by Washington Bartow Rast, the Swansea Veneer and Basket Works was an expansion of Rast’s veneer mill that he had started in 1896. Initially the factory made banana drums, barrels, furniture, and fine veneers. By 1903 production was expanded to include wooden crates, boxes, and baskets used by South Carolina’s burgeoning truck-farming industry.

"S" is for Sun News

Dec 11, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Sun News. The Sun News is a morning newspaper published daily and Sunday in Myrtle Beach. It was founded in 1935 as a weekly, the News, by C.L. Phillips and J. Clarence Macklen. In 1961 Mark Garner, owner of the weekly Myrtle Beach Sun, bought the News and merged the two newspapers into the Sun-News.  In 1973 Garner sold the Sun-News—by then a three-times-a-week newspaper to the State Record Company of Columbia. It was made a daily within two months.

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