SC From A to Z

From Hilton Head to Caesars Head, and from the Lords Proprietors to Hootie and the Blowfish, historian Walter Edgar mines the riches of the South Carolina Encyclopedia to bring you South Carolina from A to Z.

"S" is for State Road

Oct 31, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for State Road. In 1818, the General Assembly appropriated funds for roads and canals to improved transportation in the state. As part of this larger effort, construction began on a 110-mile State Road, which would connect Charleston with Columbia. The road was not designed to connect towns in the state and, except for Charleston did not enter a single county seat. The project was a true state enterprise, and for the first four years the laborers were direct state employees. Later, in 1823, all work was contracted out. The expensive undertaking was to be paid for with tolls.

"S" is for State Parks

Oct 30, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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“S” is for State Parks. The genesis of South Carolina’s system of state parks came in the 1930s with the development of sixteen parks under the auspices of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). These early parks, which included recreation facilities such as swimming lakes, trails, and campgrounds, also provided access to some of the state’s most scenic natural areas. With the dissolution of the CCC in 1942, state parks came under the management of the State Commission of Forestry.

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"L" is for Lebby, Nathaniel H. [1816-1880]. Inventor. In 1852 Lebby, an employee of the South Carolina Railroad, received a patent for a “water-raising apparatus”—a steam-driven pump frequently used in the Lowcountry’s rice fields. It was also used to deepen a channel in Charleston Harbor. When in operation, the pump discharged sizable amounts of mud, sand, and even rocks. He then made a working model of a dredge that impressed the U.S. Corps of Engineers responsible for Charleston Harbor.

"L" is for Lutherans

Oct 29, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"L" is for Lutherans. While Lutherans are the third largest Protestant denomination in the United States, their numbers have never been large in the South. In South Carolina, Lutherans make up less than two percent of the population, with highest concentrations in Newberry and Lexington Counties. Among Protestants, Lutherans typically give greater weight to the historic (“catholic”) tradition going back to the ancient church and conduct a liturgy of worship that stands in continuity with that tradition. South Carolina Lutherans formed their own synod in 1824.

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"S" is for Steele, Henry Maxwell (1922-2005). Writer, educator. A Greenville native, Steele’s first published story, “Grandfather and the Chow Dog: A Story,” appeared in Harper’s in 1944. Six years later, his first novel Debby was a critical success. Steele is best known for his short stories and twice has won O. Henry prizes. In 1956 he began teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he later served as writer in residence, professor, and director of the creative writing program.

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“S” is for State mottoes. South Carolina has two official mottoes.  Animis Opibusque Parati (Prepared in Mind and Resources) was on the rim of the front of the state seal. The words were taken from the second book of Virgil’s Aeneid at the point when Aeneas and his band of followers were about to set forth on the great voyage of adventure that ultimately lead to the founding of Rome. Revolutionary South Carolina’s use of this motto expressed confidence in the state’s destiny.

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"S" is for State Normal School. In 1873 the General Assembly, recognizing a need for trained teachers to educate African American citizens following the Civil War, passed an act to establish and support a State Normal School. The school’s regents leased a building on the University of South Carolina campus and hired faculty. The demand for teachers prompted most students to begin teaching before graduating.

"S" is for State House

Oct 24, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for State House. Three different buildings have served as the capitol of South Carolina. Located at the corner of Broad and Meeting Streets in Charleston, the first statehouse was among the most sophisticated public buildings in colonial America. When the capital was moved to Columbia, a hastily built wooden statehouse was constructed at the southeast corner of Senate and Richardson (now Main) Streets. In 1851 the construction of a new capitol began. The Civil War brought work to a standstill.

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"S" is for Steadman, Mark (b. 1930). Novelist. A native of Georgia, Steadman began teaching at Clemson in 1957 and since then his life has been centered in rural Pickens County. He taught humor and the American novel for forty years. From 1980 until 1997 he was also writer in residence. While a visiting professor at the American University in Cairo, he “found his voice” as a writer of fiction. His first novel McAfee County: A Chronicle, set in an imaginary coastal county, was an international success.

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"S" is for States' Rights. The doctrine of states’ rights, a recurring theme of South Carolina political thought, is composed of two elements: a belief that the U.S. Constitution is a compact formed by the states that retained their sovereign status; and a belief that powers not specifically granted by the Constitution to the national government remain in state hands. During the sectional controversies before the Civil War, John C. Calhoun contended that states could nullify federal laws that exceeded the constitutional powers granted to the national government.

"S" is for Stateburg

Oct 21, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Stateburg. The name of this town, located in western Sumter County in the High Hills of the Santee, reflects Stateburg’s raison d’être. A group of speculators headed by Thomas Sumter founded Stateburg in 1783 in hopes that it would be named the new state capital of South Carolina. By the time the General Assembly took up the matter of relocating the capital from Charleston, Stateburg had become a bustling village and seat of the newly established Claremont County. Sumter’s dream never became reality as legislators never seriously considered the town as the new capital.

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"S" is for Stackhouse, Eunice Temple Ford (1885-1980). Educator, clubwoman.  An honors graduate of Limestone College, Stackhouse obtained graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. Beginning in 1906, she taught education, psychology, and philosophy and ethics at Limestone. And, from 1920-1932, she was dean of the college faculty.  Honored as “the godmother of the Federation [of Women’s Clubs in South Carolina],” Stackhouse served the organization as vice president and over the years chaired various departments.

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"S" is for Springs Industries. Springs Industries, a cotton textile company, was founded in 1887 by Samuel Elliott White of Fort Mill. At White’s death, ownership of the Fort Mill Manufacturing Company was transferred to Leroy Springs. Springs and his son transformed the company (renamed Springs Cotton Mills) into a major national corporation manufacturing a variety of new fabrics - pillowcases, towels, dress goods, and rayon fabrics. By 1959 Springs Industries operated 17,800 looms and 836,000 spindles.

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"S" is for Springs, Leroy (1861-1931). Merchant, entrepreneur, manufacturer. At the age of twenty-two, Springs opened his first business, Leroy Springs & Company in Lancaster. Over the next decade he founded a lucrative cotton-shipping firm, established the Bank of Lancaster, and founded Lancaster Cotton Mills—laying the foundation of the family fortune. By the early twentieth century Springs was the president of five mercantile companies, four cotton mills, two banks, a railroad, a power company, and a cotton-compress company serving shippers in South Carolina and Georgia.

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"S" is for Springs, Elliott White (1896-1959). Businessman, aviator, author. After graduating from Princeton in 1917, Springs joined the British Royal Flying Corps. Once the United States entered World War I, he was transferred to the U.S. Army. One of the most daring “aces” of the war, he had eleven confirmed “kills.” After the war he worked for his father and began to write. War Birds: The Diary of an Unknown Aviator (a thinly-disguised account of his time in England and France during World War I) was a commercial and critical success.

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