SC From A to Z

From Hilton Head to Caesars Head, and from the Lords Proprietors to Hootie and the Blowfish, historian Walter Edgar mines the riches of the South Carolina Encyclopedia to bring you South Carolina from A to Z.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Steele, Henry Maxwell (1922-2005). Writer, educator. A Greenville native, Steele’s first published story, “Grandfather and the Chow Dog: A Story,” appeared in Harper’s in 1944. Six years later, his first novel Debby was a critical success. Steele is best known for his short stories and twice has won O. Henry prizes. In 1956 he began teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he later served as writer in residence, professor, and director of the creative writing program.

South Carolina From A to Z
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“S” is for State mottoes. South Carolina has two official mottoes.  Animis Opibusque Parati (Prepared in Mind and Resources) was on the rim of the front of the state seal. The words were taken from the second book of Virgil’s Aeneid at the point when Aeneas and his band of followers were about to set forth on the great voyage of adventure that ultimately lead to the founding of Rome. Revolutionary South Carolina’s use of this motto expressed confidence in the state’s destiny.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for State Normal School. In 1873 the General Assembly, recognizing a need for trained teachers to educate African American citizens following the Civil War, passed an act to establish and support a State Normal School. The school’s regents leased a building on the University of South Carolina campus and hired faculty. The demand for teachers prompted most students to begin teaching before graduating.

"S" is for State House

Oct 24, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for State House. Three different buildings have served as the capitol of South Carolina. Located at the corner of Broad and Meeting Streets in Charleston, the first statehouse was among the most sophisticated public buildings in colonial America. When the capital was moved to Columbia, a hastily built wooden statehouse was constructed at the southeast corner of Senate and Richardson (now Main) Streets. In 1851 the construction of a new capitol began. The Civil War brought work to a standstill.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Steadman, Mark (b. 1930). Novelist. A native of Georgia, Steadman began teaching at Clemson in 1957 and since then his life has been centered in rural Pickens County. He taught humor and the American novel for forty years. From 1980 until 1997 he was also writer in residence. While a visiting professor at the American University in Cairo, he “found his voice” as a writer of fiction. His first novel McAfee County: A Chronicle, set in an imaginary coastal county, was an international success.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for States' Rights. The doctrine of states’ rights, a recurring theme of South Carolina political thought, is composed of two elements: a belief that the U.S. Constitution is a compact formed by the states that retained their sovereign status; and a belief that powers not specifically granted by the Constitution to the national government remain in state hands. During the sectional controversies before the Civil War, John C. Calhoun contended that states could nullify federal laws that exceeded the constitutional powers granted to the national government.

"S" is for Stateburg

Oct 21, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Stateburg. The name of this town, located in western Sumter County in the High Hills of the Santee, reflects Stateburg’s raison d’être. A group of speculators headed by Thomas Sumter founded Stateburg in 1783 in hopes that it would be named the new state capital of South Carolina. By the time the General Assembly took up the matter of relocating the capital from Charleston, Stateburg had become a bustling village and seat of the newly established Claremont County. Sumter’s dream never became reality as legislators never seriously considered the town as the new capital.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Stackhouse, Eunice Temple Ford (1885-1980). Educator, clubwoman.  An honors graduate of Limestone College, Stackhouse obtained graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. Beginning in 1906, she taught education, psychology, and philosophy and ethics at Limestone. And, from 1920-1932, she was dean of the college faculty.  Honored as “the godmother of the Federation [of Women’s Clubs in South Carolina],” Stackhouse served the organization as vice president and over the years chaired various departments.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Springs Industries. Springs Industries, a cotton textile company, was founded in 1887 by Samuel Elliott White of Fort Mill. At White’s death, ownership of the Fort Mill Manufacturing Company was transferred to Leroy Springs. Springs and his son transformed the company (renamed Springs Cotton Mills) into a major national corporation manufacturing a variety of new fabrics - pillowcases, towels, dress goods, and rayon fabrics. By 1959 Springs Industries operated 17,800 looms and 836,000 spindles.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Springs, Leroy (1861-1931). Merchant, entrepreneur, manufacturer. At the age of twenty-two, Springs opened his first business, Leroy Springs & Company in Lancaster. Over the next decade he founded a lucrative cotton-shipping firm, established the Bank of Lancaster, and founded Lancaster Cotton Mills—laying the foundation of the family fortune. By the early twentieth century Springs was the president of five mercantile companies, four cotton mills, two banks, a railroad, a power company, and a cotton-compress company serving shippers in South Carolina and Georgia.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Springs, Elliott White (1896-1959). Businessman, aviator, author. After graduating from Princeton in 1917, Springs joined the British Royal Flying Corps. Once the United States entered World War I, he was transferred to the U.S. Army. One of the most daring “aces” of the war, he had eleven confirmed “kills.” After the war he worked for his father and began to write. War Birds: The Diary of an Unknown Aviator (a thinly-disguised account of his time in England and France during World War I) was a commercial and critical success.

"S" is for Springs

Oct 14, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Springs. The springs of South Carolina became popular destinations for the state’s citizens beginning in the late eighteenth century. There were scores of mineral springs in the state. Some were local watering holes, but others became fashionable resorts. Large hotels were built to take advantage of the mineral springs. Glenn Springs in Spartanburg—with water that smelled like sulfur and had a bitter alkaline taste—was one of the best known.

"S" is for Springdale

Oct 11, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Springdale (Lexington County; 2010 population: 2,635). One of the youngest towns in the Midlands, until World War II this was a farming community with daily life dominated by crops, weather, seasons, church activities, and classes at Long Branch School. In 1955, reacting to fears of annexation by nearby West Columbia and Cayce, residents informed state officials of tentative plans to establish the town of Sherwood. In the ensuing election, voters were asked to do three things: approve or reject incorporation; if approved, the form of government; and name the new town.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Spratt, John McKee, Jr. (b. 1942). Congressman, lawyer. Reared in York, Spratt graduated from Davidson College; was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford, and obtained his law degree from Yale. After military service he returned home to practice law. In 1982, he was elected to Congress from the 5th Congressional District—and was subsequently re-elected until 2010—serving in the House twenty-eight years. In Congress Spratt garnered seats on three key House committees:  Budget, Armed Services, and Government Reform and Oversight.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Spotted salamander. State amphibian. The spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) became the official state amphibian in June 1999. The designation resulted from the interest and activity of children in the third-grade class at Woodlands Heights Elementary School in Spartanburg. Students conducted research and a letter-writing campaign to get the amphibian adopted, enlisting support from scientists, public officials, and other third-graders in the state.

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