SCEMD

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Why don’t people leave when a hurricane hits where they live? And how do news outlets and emergency officials and even governors make people understand that they should?

Those are two questions that vex all of the above-mentioned groups during a storm. In the first week of September, Hurricane Dorian menaced the South Carolina coast for days and triggered evacuation orders for every beach community in the state.

And yet, more people than not in some evacuation zones just didn’t evacuate.  

Tina Davis, GIS specialist, and Mike Lewis, recovery specialist, take in some training at the York County OEM, to better know how to handle an emergency.
Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Emergency management coordinators in South Carolina have a lot to think about. A lot to think about.

On any given day, a normally quiet command center, like the one deep in the ground below Greenville City Hall, could fill up with representatives from a whole pile of agencies in a matter of minutes.

“County Public Works, the American Red Cross, the Department of Social Services, DHEC, law

The S.C. Emergency Management Division has started a program, the Citizens' Academy, to help the public understand what state and local governments do to respond to emergencies, such as the historic 2015 flood.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

The past few years of historic floods and hurricanes has amply demonstrated how subject South Carolina can be to severe weather emergencies.  To help the public better understand how the state reacts to and deals with these situations, the S.C. Emergency Management Division has created a new program, the Citizens' Academy.