South Carolina

Columbia Moves Closer to 100% Renewable Energy

May 31, 2017
Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin is one of 26 mayors to particpiate in the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin is one of over 60 mayors across the U.S. who has joined with the Sierra Club's Ready for 100 Campaign. The goal is to get 100 cities to switch from fossil fuel to clean energy. During a press conference Wednesday, Mayor Benjamin said decisions made by President Trump highlights the need for local governments to work together on environmental policy making.

"It only underscores the importance of the true leadership at every level of government, pushing to make sure that we hand over to our children the country and the world that they deserve."

A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893 to 2006
University of South Carolina Press

(Originally broadcast 12/09/16) - In the third volume of the history of Beaufort County, Lawrence S. Rowland and Stephen R. Wise conclude their five hundred–year chronicle of the legendary South Carolina Sea Islands. A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893–2006 (2016, USC Press) begins with the devastating Sea Island Hurricane of 1893, one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

Greenville Chautauqua illustration: Rachel Carson, Cesar Chavez, Maya Angelou, Abraham Lincoln
Greenville Chautauqua

Before radio and television, traveling cultural tent shows toured across America. The original Chautauqua was a road show of music, entertainment, and always a great speaker of the day. At their peak, Tent Chautauquas appeared in over 10,000 communities and preformed for more than 45 million people.

Members of the House-Senate Conference Committee debating a road funding bill on May 4, 2017.
S.C. Senate

With one week remaining before adjournment, the S.C. General Assembly still has some heavy lifting to do.

An advertisement for the fair appears in the Keowee Courier (Pickens Court House, S.C.), October 18, 1905.
South Carolina Digital Newspaper Room/https://library.sc.edu/blogs/newspaper/

Dr. Rodger Stroup, retired Director of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, is taking a deep dive into the history of the South Carolina State Fair, doing research for an upcoming book on the subject. Stroup talks with Walter Edgar about the history of South Carolina’s fair—which goes back farther than you think—in context with other states’ fairs.

All Stations: Fri, May 05, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, May 07, 4 pm

"G" is for Grand Strand. South Carolina’s Grand Strand is an uninterrupted strip of sandy beaches that officially stretches along sixty miles of Horry and Georgetown Counties from the North Carolina border to Winyah Bay. Unofficially the Grand Strand has referred to the greater Myrtle Beach area since the early 1920s. The Grand Strand is an unbroken strip of municipalities and communities strung together along US Highway 17. The first visitors were middle class and blue-color families from the Carolinas, but today's vacationers come from all over.

 "F" is for the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina [1669-1698]. Part Constitution and part promotional tract, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina comprised a much-revised document that the Lords Proprietors created to govern their New World province. Among the guiding principles of the constitutions were that landownership was the bedrock of society and that Carolina’s government should avoid creating a "numerous democracy." The proprietors’ insistence on provisions for considerable religious liberty was innovative.

"D" is for Drayton, Percival [1812-1865]. Naval Officer. Born in Charleston, Drayton’s family moved to Philadelphia in the 1830s. At fifteen, he was appointed a midshipman in the US Navy. Eventually he commanded a variety of vessels, including the Mississippi, the navy’s third steam-powered warship. In 1861, he held the rank of commander. While many southern-born officers resigned their commissions, Drayton chose to remain with the Union. In October 1861 he commanded a ship in the Port Royal Expedition.

"C" is for Charleston Hospital Workers’ Strike [1969]. In Charleston in 1969, more than 400 African American hospital workers (mostly female) went on strike against the all-white administrations of the Medical College Hospital and Charleston County Hospital. The strike against the Medical College lasted one hundred days during the spring and summer; the one at Charleston County went on for an additional three weeks.

Dr. J. Drew Lanham
Clemson University

“In me, there is the red of miry clay, the brown of spring floods, the gold of ripening tobacco. I am, in the deepest sense, colored.” From these fertile soils—of love, land, identity, family, and race—emerges The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature (2016, Milkweed Editions) a big-hearted, unforgettable memoir by ornithologist J. Drew Lanham.

"B" is for Bishopville

Apr 24, 2017

"B" is for Bishopville [Lee County; population 3,670]. Bishopville, the seat of Lee County, traces its origins to prehistoric days when two Indian trails crossed near the future site of the town. European settlement began in the late 18th century and, for a time was known as Singleton’s Cross Roads. In 1821 Dr. Jacques Bishop purchased property in the area and operated a general store—by the late 1830s the little settlement was called Bishopville. The town has also served as a business and cultural center throughout its existence.

The South Carolina Senate
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

With the adjournment clock ticking, the S.C. Senate is finally debating a bill to fix the state's deteriorating roads and bridges.

"R" is for Rivers, John Minott [1903—1988]. Broadcasting executive. After college, Rivers, a native of Charleston, moved to Greenville. There he became friends with the president of the Liberty Life Insurance Company that operated WCSC radio in Charleston. In 1938 he became president of South Carolina Broadcasting Company, which operated WCSC. He later purchased the station. In 1948 he began operation of an FM station. In 1953, he put WCSC-TV, South Carolina’s first VHF television station on the air.

Requiem for Mother Emanuel: No. 9
Courtesy of the artist

Renowned South Carolina artist, Leo Twiggs, now 82, has long been fascinated by the contradictions of the South, and he has defined a unique iconography in his work by seizing on certain symbols, especially the Confederate battle flag, its stars and bars, the shape of an “X” and the image of a target, with its sequential rings and bull’s-eye.

Again this year, the fate of a bill to fix state roads and bridges will be determined in the S.C. Senate.

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