trees

Tulip Trees

Jul 16, 2020
A tulip tree leaf
Stanley Zimny [CC BY-NC 2.0] via Flickr

Liriodendron tulipifera is sometimes referred to as tulip tree, tulip poplar or yellow poplar, and the wood simply as "poplar", although not closely related to the true poplars. Other common names include canoewood, saddle-leaf tree, and white wood.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Earlier this month, the South Carolina Forestry Commission estimated the that tornadoes that hit the state on April 13 destroyed close to 4,300 acres of trees. In dollars, that adds up to about $4 million in losses to South Carolina’s timber industry.

While that’s less than 1 percent of the state’s timber economy overall, it’s not an evenly distributed sum. Smaller landowners, with 20 to 40 acres and who lost a few acres of trees on April 13,  could face some significant losses, says Patrick Hiesl, assistant professor of forestry operations at Clemson University.

Osage Orange

Feb 28, 2019
Osage Orange Trees
Msact via en.wikipedia.org

Osage Orange trees have been imported from the Osage region of North America.

The Wool Sower Gall

May 17, 2018
A Wool Sewer Gall.
Jessica Lucia [CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] via Flickr

This fuzzy gall is always found on White Oaks.

The Tulip Tree

May 16, 2018
A tulip tree in flower.
Erica Maxine via Pixabay

One common name for this tree is "Tulip Poplar." However, it is not in the poplar family, but in the magnolia.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. A cultivar is a named variety of a particular plant that was selected or breed to have certain characteristics, often they’re vegetatively propagated  so all the plants with that name are exactly the same. It used to be that people often planted seedling dogwoods in their yards and the only downside was perhaps waiting a long time for the trees to bloom.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The dreaded Dogwood anthracnose, Discula distructiva, is a death knoll for that loveliest of native trees. There is another disease called spot anthracnose caused by a different fungus that fortunately is cosmetic instead of fatal. It causes problems when we have a wet spring with high humidity and may just make small lesions on the leaves that you probably won’t even notice it.

Dogwood Anthrachnose

Apr 19, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Dogwood anthracnose, with the frightening name Discula distructiva, was first identified in north eastern forests in 1978. Beginning with attacks on leaves and twigs, this disease spreads to branches and trunks and has caused mortality rates well above fifty percent in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Riding up to Clemson recently, my husband and I couldn’t stop ohhing and ahhing about the beauty our native flowering dogwood, Cornus florida, in full bloom, gave to the woodlands bordering the highway. Dogwoods are naturally an understory small tree, occurring in open woods or along their margins.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. If you visit the website Charlotte Tree Plan and read about the benefits of urban trees you’ll be encouraged to plant the largest shade tree possible in your yard this fall. For us, fall is the best time to add new trees and shrubs to our landscape, the roots can grow during the winter making the plant stronger when next summer’s hot weather rolls around.  At the Charlotte Tree Plan page, you’ll see the many benefits residents of the Queen City receive from their urban forest.

Inchworms a Threat?

Sep 7, 2017

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. We enjoyed the solar eclipse from the comfort of our Saint Matthews yard. Although lots of people searched out and set up camp in open fields, I’m not a sun lover and we simply  made periodic forays from our  covered porch out into an  open area of the front yard to observe the progress of the blackout. Numerous shade trees help keep our eighteen eighties home cool, a  value familiar to residents of cities with active urban tree programs.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Making It Grow gets lots of calls from Charlotte, right up the road in North Carolina. Charlotte is rightfully proud of its urban tree program and the City does a lot to protect its valuable tree canopy, which provides numerous benefits to its citizens. As we watch the devastation from Hurricane Harvey, it should serve as an encouragement for all of us to plant trees in our urban areas.

The trunk of a Hercules Club tree, in Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge.
Chesapeake Bay Program [CC BY-NC 2.0], via Flickr

Hercules Club tree, also known as a devil's walking stick or prickly ash, at Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

A flowering Chinaberry tree.
Paolo Fisicaro, via Wikimedia Commons

Chinaberry trees are in flower. These non-native plants were often planted in the 19th century on home sites.

Redbud Tree
Dcrjsr [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A listener who is new to South Carolina asks, is this tree native or invasive.

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