Walter Edgar

"B" is for Banov, Leon

Dec 17, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"B" is for Banov, Leon [1888-1971]. Physician. Public Health Official. Born in Poland, Banov immigrated to Charleston at the age of eight. He received his pharmacy degree from the Medical College of South Carolina and returned to the College and obtained his M.D. In 1920 he was appointed Charleston County's first public health officer and instituted routine medical examinations of schoolchildren, enforced existing laws requiring smallpox vaccinations, and advocated vaccination against typhoid.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"A" is for African Theological Archministry, Inc. [Oyotunji Village]. In 1973 a group of African Americans established an independent Yoruba kingdom at Sheldon, fourteen miles from Beaufort. The Kingdom of Oyotunji Village is headed by Oba [or King] Efuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I. Oyotunji means “Oya again awakes” or “Oya rises again.” Oya was an ancient city-state kingdom in Yorubaland located in present day Nigeria, Togo, Benin, and Ghana.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Sullivan's Island, Battle of (June 28, 1776). The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first major patriot victory in the Revolutionary War. In February 1776, after British plans to capture Charleston were revealed, South Carolina patriots began construction of a palmetto log and sand fort on Sullivan’s Island. At 11:30 a.m. on June 28th the British fleet began a daylong bombardment. The fort withstood the pounding from the heavy British guns. The patriots returned fire and their solid shot and shells tore into the wooden ships.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Swansea Veneer and Basket Works. Founded in 1914 by Washington Bartow Rast, the Swansea Veneer and Basket Works was an expansion of Rast’s veneer mill that he had started in 1896. Initially the factory made banana drums, barrels, furniture, and fine veneers. By 1903 production was expanded to include wooden crates, boxes, and baskets used by South Carolina’s burgeoning truck-farming industry.

"S" is for Sun News

Dec 11, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Sun News. The Sun News is a morning newspaper published daily and Sunday in Myrtle Beach. It was founded in 1935 as a weekly, the News, by C.L. Phillips and J. Clarence Macklen. In 1961 Mark Garner, owner of the weekly Myrtle Beach Sun, bought the News and merged the two newspapers into the Sun-News.  In 1973 Garner sold the Sun-News—by then a three-times-a-week newspaper to the State Record Company of Columbia. It was made a daily within two months.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Sumter, Thomas (1734-1832). Soldier, congressman, U.S. senator. A native Virginian, Sumter moved to South Carolina around 1764 and settled in St. John’s Berkeley Parish where he opened a country store. He later married a wealthy widow and moved to her plantation In St. Mark’s Parish. With the coming of the Revolution, he served in the army and rose to the rank of colonel. He retired in 1778, but with the British invasion in 1780 he was back in uniform as an upcountry partisan leader.

"S" is for Sumter

Dec 9, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Sumter (Sumter County; 2010 population 40,576). When the South Carolina legislature created Sumter District (named for the area’s most prominent resident Thomas Sumter) in 1800, the legislators also established the crossroads village of Sumterville as the courthouse seat. The town was incorporated in 1845 and in 1855 its names shortened to Sumter. By 1900 the town was a major cotton and tobacco market and home to several industries, including a textile mill and an ice-manufacturing plant.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Summerville (Dorchester County; 2010 population 42,210). Summerville was established as a summer refuge for plantation owners of St. George’s Dorchester and St. Paul’s parishes. Prior to 1831 Summerville had few year-round residents, but the population swelled in the summers as lowcountry planters sought the breezes and pine forests that were deemed healthier than their swampland rice plantations. With the coming of the railroad in 1831 the permanent town was established—and, in 1847 incorporated.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Summers, Eliza Ann (1844-1900). Educator. A native of Woodbury, Connecticut, in 1866 Summers volunteered her services to the American Missionary Society to teach emancipated slaves in South Carolina. In January 1867 she arrived at Hilton Head. She and another teacher were assigned to work in Mitchellville--a hamlet of numerous small wooden houses built for five hundred former slave families. Three churches were utilized as freedmen schools. Throughout the next six months the teachers conducted both day and evening schools for pupils of all ages.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Sully, Thomas (1783-1872). Portraitist. Sully was born in Lincolnshire, England. In 1792 the entire family immigrated to the United States and in 1794 settled in Charleston. Sully studied with several local artists before leaving the city in 1799. He went to England in 1809 where he, like other aspiring artists, spent his time copying canvases by Benjamin West and old masters painters.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Sullivan’s Island (Charleston County; 2010 population 1,703). Sullivan’s Island was discovered in 1666 by Captain Robert Sandford and named for Captain Florence O’Sullivan, a former Irish soldier and one of South Carolina’s first colonists. In 1674 O’Sullivan was given the responsibility of manning the signal cannon on the island at the entrance to Charleston Harbor.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Sugarloaf Mountain (Chesterfield County). Sugarloaf Mountain is an erosional remnant located in the Sand Hills State Forest within the upper coastal plain. It lies 513 feet above sea level and 100 feet above the surrounding terrain. From this position and elevation, Sugarloaf offers a wide view of the surrounding landscape. The sand dunes and clays that make up Sugarloaf were originally rocks of the various mountain ranges that formed beginning in the Ordovician period and continuing during the Devonian and Permian periods and then wore away.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel. The Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel is an unfinished nineteenth-century railroad tunnel located near Walhalla. In the 1850s planners contemplated cutting a one-and-one-half mile railroad tunnel through the heart of the mountain in order to link the state’s rail lines with the Blue Ridge Railroad coming from Knoxville, Tennessee. If successful, this enterprise would have linked Charleston with the commercial heartland of the new nation.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stuart's Town. Stuart’s Town was a Scottish colony founded in 1684 and envisioned by the Lords Proprietors as a counterweight to the somewhat ungovernable English settlement at Charleston. Establishing New World colonies was difficult and dangerous work, but when the proprietors sought new settlers in 1689, they found willing recruits among Scots Covenanters (Presbyterians facing persecution for their adherence to the Covenant of 1683). The Covenanters wanted political autonomy and freedom of worship—which the Lords Proprietors guaranteed.

South Carolina From A to Z
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"S" is for Stuart, John (1718-1779). Soldier, colonial official. A native Scot, Stuart joined the Royal Navy. In 1748 he settled in Charleston. As a militia captain, in 1759, he was assigned to Fort Loudon in East Tennessee among the Overhill Cherokees. In 1762 he was named superintendent of Indian affairs for the Southern District. In his new position Stuart controlled the licensure of Indian traders and the transfer of Indian lands under his control—irritating other colonial officials.

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