Walter Edgar

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind. The South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind began in 1849 as a private school. The state purchased it in 1856. From a handful of students, by the twenty-first century the institution had grown to more than four hundred students—enrolled from pre-school to high school as well as vocational and post-secondary programs. While the main campus remains in Spartanburg, regional outreach centers are maintained in Charleston, Columbia, Conway, Florence, and Rock Hill. The school is governed by a board of twelve commissioners.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Spartanburg County (811 square miles; 2010 population: 284,748). Spartanburg County is located in the northwestern section of South Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Originally occupied by the Cherokees as a hunting ground, the area was not open to European settlement until 1755. In 1785 Spartanburg was one of six counties established in the interior of the state by the General Assembly. Subsistence agriculture gave way to short-staple cotton in the nineteenth century that, in turn, was replaced by peaches as the county’s cash crop.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Review. The South Carolina Review is a literary miscellany featuring short fiction, poetry, critical essays, interviews, and book reviews. Founded at Furman University in 1968, the Review, was edited and published there until 1973, when it moved to Clemson University under the leadership of Richard J. Calhoun, who became editor. Special issues dedicated to single authors represent the publication’s efforts to promote the exchange of ideas and discoveries.

"S" is for Spartanburg

Sep 12, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Spartanburg (Spartanburg County; 2010 population 36,786). The town of Spartanburg was incorporated in 1831, its name originating from a local Revolutionary War regiment: the Spartan Rifles. The town was built around an open rectangle of land, which became known as Morgan Square. Long an upcountry commercial center, Spartanburg’s commercial and financial role expanded further following a flurry of cotton mill building. By 1909 there were nine mills in or near the city.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Railroad. The South Carolina Railroad was chartered in 1827 as the South Carolina Railroad and Canal Company. Completed in 1833, the road stretched 136 miles from Charleston to Summerville, Branchville, Blackville, Aiken, and ending in Hamburg. At the time it was the longest railroad under single management in the world. . By 1848 there were branches to Camden ad Columbia. In 1853 the railroad reached into Augusta, Georgia. And in 1858 permitted to join its track to the Georgia Railroad.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Spartan Mills. Organized in 1888 by John H. Montgomery and other upcountry business leaders, Spartan Mills was the first textile mill built within the Spartanburg city limits. In 1889 Spartan Mills merged with Whitfield of Newburyport, Massachusetts, in an agreement whereby all machinery from Whitfield was shipped to Spartanburg. The first mill began operations in 1890 with thirty thousand spindles and eleven hundred looms—making it the largest mill in the state at the time. In addition to the factory, 150 mill homes were built in a surrounding village.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Public Service Authority. The South Carolina Public Service Authority was established by the General Assembly in 1934 with the power to provide navigation and flood control on the Santee, Congaree, and Cooper Rivers; to generate electricity; to reclaim swampland; and to reforest the state’s watersheds. The prospect of using New Deal funds to build a hydroelectric generating station in the lowcountry excited many of that area’s powerful legislators. These men envisioned a small industrial empire in the lowcountry, supplied with Santee Cooper power.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Spanish moss. Spanish Moss is a gray tree-borne epiphyte native to the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. As an epiphyte, Spanish moss gets water and food from the air and does not harm the host tree. It is not a true moss but a relative of the pineapple family. It produces small, yellow-green, three-petaled flowers in the spring and early summer. In mid- to late summer seedpods burst forth and rely on the wind for distribution. The plants are a tangle of long stems and slender leaves.

"S" is for Spanish

Sep 5, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Spanish. Some of Spain’s earliest efforts at exploration, evangelization, and settlement in the present-day United States took place within South Carolina’s boundaries. The first documented appearance was 1521 when a slave-raiding expedition stopped in Winyah Bay. In 1526, Lucas Vàsquez de Ayllón founded the short-lived settlement, San Miguel de Gualdape, on the coast of present-day South Carolina. Hernando De Soto and his army of six hundred came into contact with the chiefdom of Cofitachiqui marching through what is South Carolina in 1540.

"S" is for Soybeans

Sep 4, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Soybeans. An important cash crop widely grown in South Carolina, soybeans were first cultivated as a soil builder and animal fodder. Farmers simply broadcast the seeds and turned livestock into the fields to forage. Recognizing the crop’s potential to free the state’s farmers from “King Cotton,” the agriculturalist John Edward Wannamaker worked to develop soybean varieties that would thrive in South Carolina. Soybeans became a cash crop in the state in the late 1940s. Farmers liked the crop’s low fertilizer requirements and soil-building character.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Southern Wesleyan University. Southern Wesleyan University (SWU) is a private Christian liberal arts institution located in the town of Central in Pickens County. Founded in 1906 as Wesleyan Methodist Bible Institute, the university is affiliated with the Wesleyan Church, an evangelical denomination with Methodist roots in the American tradition. Since its founding the school’s name has evolved from Wesleyan Methodist College (1909), to Central Wesleyan College (1959), to Southern Wesleyan University (1995).

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Southern Textile Exposition. First envisioned by the Southern Textile Association, the Southern Textile Exposition invited local textile representatives to exhibit their machinery, products and services. In 1915, unable to hold the show in Atlanta, Greenville business leaders agreed to sponsor the event. With the exhibition’s overwhelming success, a “Textile Hall” was constructed to house the event. Aided by the influx of northern textile companies, the Southern Textile Exposition became a symbol of South Carolina’s growing industrial economy.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Southern Quarterly Review. The Southern Quarterly Review (SQR) originated in New Orleans in January 1842, but moved to Charleston later that year. It remained there until 1854 when it moved to Baltimore. A year later it returned to South Carolina where it was published in Columbia in 1856 and 1857. The SQR had the advantage of being not a literary magazine, but rather a magazine open to any branch of knowledge. It also had experienced editors in Daniel K. Whitaker (a transplanted New Englander) and South Carolina’s man of letters William Gilmore Simms.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Southern Methodist Church. In 1934 white Methodists in the southern states who opposed the unification of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and the Methodist Episcopal Church, which had split over slavery in 1844 along with the Methodist Protestant Church, formed the Laymen’s Organization for the Preservation of the Southern Methodist Church. They feared northern domination and racial integration. In 1939 some four hundred opponents of reunification met in Columbia and a year later formed the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Southern Aviation School. The Southern Aviation School in Camden was founded in November 1940 by Frank Hulse and Ike Jones. They obtained contracts to provide flight training in Greenville and Anderson for students at Clemson and Furman. The program’s success led to the school’s leasing Woodward Airport in Camden and obtaining a contract with the U.S. Army Air Corps to train student pilots. Within ninety days the company built barracks, classrooms, additional hangers, and employed civilian instructors and ground-school instructors.

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