Walter Edgar

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Good Roads Association. Formed in 1897, he South Carolina Good Roads Association (SCGRA) was a catalyst for change in transportation policy and construction in the late 1890s and the first four decades of the twentieth century. Good roads promoters included civil engineers, dealers in roads materials and equipment, and community and civic leaders. The SCGRA originally emphasized the construction and maintenance of quality sand-clay, stone, or macadam farm to market roads.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina-Georgia Border. On June 29, 1977, an altercation between Georgia law enforcement officers and a South Carolina shrimp boat captain attracted national attention and rekindled a controversy that would not be resolved until 1990. A 1976 amendment to the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 allowed grants and loans to coastal states to offset damage expected from the production of offshore oil. This appeal for federal aid forced South Carolina and Georgia to settle a border dispute that had been simmering for two centuries. In 1990, the U.S.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South-Carolina Gazette. The South-Carolina Gazette began publication in 1732 in Charleston, and continued with some interruptions for more than four decades. For almost its entire existence, the paper was published by the Timothy family. Lewis Timothy, a former employee of Benjamin Franklin, assumed control of the Gazette in 1734. When he died, his widow Elizabeth continued the enterprise until their son Peter was of age. The weekly had a typical mix of news items, advertisements, reprinted material from other publications, and literature.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Federation of Museums. Museum professionals who saw the need for museum staff and volunteers to work together to strengthen South Carolina’s museums founded the South Carolina Federation of Museums (SCFM) in 1971. SCFM is a nonprofit professional association that represents and promotes the state’s museums. The organization sponsors workshops and meetings that provide members with specialized skills and knowledge applicable to all areas of museum expertise.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Equal Suffrage League. The South Carolina Equal Suffrage League (SCESL) was formed by the Spartanburg New Era Club and other members of the white South Carolina Federation of Women’s Clubs in 1914. Hannah Hemphill Coleman was elected the first president of the organization—which was affiliated with the National American Woman Suffrage Association. By 1917, the membership of the SCESL had grown to twenty-five clubs and some three thousand members.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Electric & Gas Company. South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (SCE&G), primarily an energy firm, was formed by the merger of dozens of companies over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Broad River Power Company adopted the name South Carolina Electric & Gas Company in 1937. Five years later Lexington Power Company merged with SCE&G). SCE&G became fully independent in 1946 after briefly being held by the General Public Utilities Corporation.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Public Radio. South Carolina Public Radio (SCPR) originated as South Carolina Educational Television-Radio and began broadcasting in 1972 when WEPR (90.1) Greenville signed on the air. This was the first of what would become an eight-transmitter statewide public radio network. These eight stations have allowed SCPR to fulfill its mission of providing continuous public radio programming to more than three hundred thousand people per week in three states. In 1996 SCPR moved to a twenty-four hour operation day.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Educational Television Network. The South Carolina Educational Television Network (SCETV) is a state agency providing educational, cultural, and historical programming to South Carolinians through telecommunications. SCETV began in 1957, with a resolution by the General Assembly calling for a sturdy of the use of television in the public schools. Within six years that pilot had developed into a closed circuit network that reached schools in all forty-six counties—and included one open circuit broadcast station, WNTV in Greenville. Under Henry J.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism. Created by the General Assembly in 1967, the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism (SCPRT) is charged with promoting tourism in the state, operating a system of state parks, and assisting local governments in the development of recreational facilities and programs. The establishment of SCPRT coincided with the dramatic expansion of South Carolina’s tourism industry and its economic impact that occurred in the 1970s.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Officially formed on July 1, 1994, the South Carolina Department of Natural resources (SCDNR) combined the non-regulatory programs of the South Carolina Water resources Commission and Land Resources Commission, the State Geological Survey, the South Carolina Migratory Waterfowl Committee, and the South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department. SCDNR is governed by a policy-making board of directors of seven members appointed by and serving at the will of the governor. The board appoints the agency director.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Department of Education. The South Carolina Department of Education is the administrative arm of the State Board of Education. The elected Superintendent of Education is secretary to the State Board of Education, a body of seventeen members appointed by legislators and the governor, which acts as the policy-making body for public elementary and secondary education. The department promulgates and oversees state educational policies for the state’s schools, as well as providing services, technical assistance, and assessment.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Department of Commerce. The South Carolina Department of Commerce administers South Carolina’s economic development program. In 1945 the General Assembly created the Department of Research, Planning, and Development-- later known as the State Development Board, it had five governor-appointed members. Governor Fritz Hollings was the first governor to make economic development a central concern. He increased board membership and it began concentrating its efforts on industry recruitment. In 1993 the Development Board became the S.C. Department of Commerce.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S is for South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Located in Columbia, the South Carolina Department of Archives and History is a state agency responsible for collecting the valuable public records of South Carolina. In 1891, the legislature established the Public Records Commission to obtain copies of South Carolina Records in the British Public Records Office and, in 1894, created the South Carolina Historical Commission to preserve them.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. In 1967, the General Assembly created The South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. It replaced the Advisory Council on Higher Education that had been created in 1962. The commission serves as a statewide higher education coordinating body. There are fourteen members, who are appointed by the governor and approved by the General Assembly.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Commission on Government Restructuring. In March 1991 Governor Carroll Campbell appointed the thirty-eight-member Commission on Government Restructuring to devise a blueprint for enhancing the powers of the state’s weak chief executive. The report, issued in September 1991, called for a dramatic shift to a cabinet fork of government similar to that used in forty states. Almost all agencies and boards would be reorganized into fifteen cabinet departments with directors appointed by the governor.

Pages