Women

Southern Women

Sep 21, 2020
Walter Edgar's Journal
SC Public Radio

The Southern woman has long been synonymous with the Southern belle, a “moonlight and magnolias” myth that gets nowhere close to describing the strong, richly diverse women who have thrived because of—and in some cases, despite—the South.

Emily Anderson Dunovantfield lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. She was well-educated and what many called a traditional woman. But during the early 1900's, Dunovant used a radical voice to help elevate the women's suffrage cause in South Carolina. 

Eulalie Salley pictured second from right, with then governor of South Carolina Ronald McNair, as he signed the 19th Amendment in 1969 .Source: https://sohp.org
Image courtesy of the Edgewood Project.

Eulalie was born in Georgia on December 11, 1883. She grew up on a plantation near Augusta, was privately educated and attended both, Virginia's Mary Baldwin College and Converse College in Spartanburg, SC. In 1906, she married attorney Julian Salley (later mayor of Aiken) and together they had two children. But it was the court case of another woman's fight to regain custody of her own children that prompted Salley to join the fight for suffrage.

Southern Women

Mar 23, 2020
Walter Edgar's Journal
SC Public Radio

The Southern woman has long been synonymous with the Southern belle, a “moonlight and magnolias” myth that gets nowhere close to describing the strong, richly diverse women who have thrived because of—and in some cases, despite—the South.

Women Vision SC – On South Carolina Public Radio

Apr 25, 2019

Who are some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts? What was their personal journey to success and what common themes helped them develop a vision for achievement? South Carolina Public Radio launches a series of Women Vision SC interview segments beginning on April 30th.