Justin Chang

Justin Chang is a film critic for the Los Angeles Times and NPR's Fresh Air, and a regular contributor to KPCC's FilmWeek. He previously served as chief film critic and editor of film reviews for Variety.

Chang is the author of FilmCraft: Editing, a book of interviews with seventeen top film editors. He serves as chair of the National Society of Film Critics and secretary of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Nearly every review I've read of Alfonso Cuarón's Roma has insisted that you must see it on the big screen, and it's hard not to agree. You can certainly watch and appreciate this immaculately photographed movie when it hits your Netflix queue, but it's hard to imagine its immersive storytelling and virtuoso camerawork having quite the same effect.

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Joel and Ethan Coen have an erratic body of work but a remarkably consistent worldview. So it's no surprise that their six-part Western anthology, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, feels like both an entirely coherent vision and something of a mixed bag.

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This is FRESH AIR. Our film critic Justin Chang has a review of the new movie "Can You Ever Forgive Me?" It's adapted from a memoir by Lee Israel, a New York writer who in the early 1990s began forging letters attributed to literary luminaries including Dorothy Parker and Noel Coward and selling them to unsuspecting collectors. Melissa McCarthy plays Israel in the movie, which costars Richard E. Grant and is directed by Marielle Heller. Here's Justin's review.

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This is FRESH AIR. The new movie "First Man" dramatizes the long buildup to the Apollo 11 moon landing from the perspective of Neil Armstrong, played by Ryan Gosling. The ensemble cast also includes Claire Foy, Jason Clarke and Kyle Chandler. It's the latest picture from Damien Chazelle, who won an Oscar two years ago for directing the musical "La La Land." Film critic Justin Chang has this review.

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The ingeniously high-concept whodunit Searching isn't the first movie to turn the big screen into a computer screen, to make you feel as if you're eavesdropping on online conversations and surfing the Internet alongside its characters. You might have seen the 2014 horror movie Unfriended, where a group chat suddenly turns deadly — basically the Skype version of Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None.

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This is FRESH AIR. The romantic comedy "Crazy Rich Asians" has generated a lot of anticipation as the first major Hollywood studio film in years to focus on contemporary Asian and Asian-American characters. Adapted from Kevin Kwan's 2013 best-seller, the movie stars Constance Wu as a New Yorker who travels to Singapore to meet her boyfriend's wealthy family. Film critic Justin Chang has this review.

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