South Carolina Public Radio News

Emily Anderson Dunovantfield lived in Edgefield, South Carolina. She was well-educated and what many called a traditional woman. But during the early 1900's, Dunovant used a radical voice to help elevate the women's suffrage cause in South Carolina. 

Dr. Linda Bell (second from left) and Gov. Henry McMaster
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for August 11, 2020, we discuss The State's recent report on emails from State Epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell showing that she regretted not taking a stronger stance during press conferences with Gov. Henry McMaster. In the emails, Bell says the governor's staff misled people into thinking she also supported the reopening of close contact services in May. Also on this episode: a look at recent polling on how Gov. McMaster is handling the crisis; a detailed analysis on what is now forecasted to be an extremely active hurricane season; and more.

Critical care nurse Michele Baudet gowns up before going into a COVID-19 patient's room at Waccamaw Community Hospital in Murrells Inlet on July 31, 2020. The hospital is over capacity and has been handling with a surge of patients since mid-June with no
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

On this special edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson takes you to Tidelands Waccamaw Community Hospital in Georgetown County to speak with healthcare workers at the frontlines of the COVID-19 surge in South Carolina.

The most recent weekly COVID-19 death rates in South Carolina through August 1, 2020, according to SC DHEC.
DHEC

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for August 6, 2020, we bring you updates from State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman on school reopenings, virtual classrooms, truancy, and more. Also on this episode: a look at how Americans feel about the November election; the state of minority owned small businesses; when high school sports could resume; and more.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Right now, around the country, communities are asking hard questions about the role of police – does policing need an overhaul? How can officers better serve communities? And how can departments ratchet down tensions that can lead to aggression by and against police officers?

Well before the flashpoint that was the George Floyd incident, scholars and social reformers were posing an answer to questions like these: female officers.

More SC Public Radio News

Airbnb is going through a rough patch just as the rental home-sharing company is reportedly on the cusp of filing for an IPO later this month.

The company's latest challenge is dealing with a party-throwing renter whose large shindig ended with a shooting and three people injured.

Now, Airbnb says that for the first time, it will pursue legal measures against a guest for violating its party-house ban.

Discussions for the next round of coronavirus relief funding remain ensnared in a political back and forth over election money, with the topic of mail-in voting a lingering point of contention between Democrats and the Trump administration.

President Trump on Wednesday spent much of his daily briefing to reporters railing against additional funding to support the U.S. Postal Service and mail-in voting, making the baseless accusation that voting by mail is ripe for fraud.

A broken cable at Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory has torn a gaping 100-foot hole in the dish of one of the largest radio telescopes in the world, taking the instrument offline until repairs can be made.

Arecibo's massive reflector dish, which is built inside a sinkhole in northern Puerto Rico, was damaged when a 3-inch diameter support cable unexpectedly snapped before dawn on Monday, according to the University of Central Florida, which manages the observatory.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Democrats formally introduced their presidential ticket today in Delaware. That is where Joe Biden and his newly named running mate, California Senator Kamala Harris, delivered remarks. Biden announced yesterday he was picking Harris to be the first woman of color on the ticket of a major political party. Here's what he had to say today.

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WINIFRED FREDERICKS: Well, my name is Winifred Fredericks, also known as Sister Nandy. That's my name that I acquired during the civil rights struggle.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Winifred Fredericks was a daughter of New York City, a sister of the civil rights movement and a mother to the next generation of Black leaders. Fredericks died of COVID-19 in April, just 10 days before her 93rd birthday.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

We're back with season two of Play It Forward, where we talk with artists about their music and the artists they're thankful for. The band Indigo Girls has shaped a generation of singer-songwriters.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

The Big 12 Conference is moving ahead with its football season, announcing that fall sports will continue – with teams following safety precautions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The conference hopes to hold its title game in December, as it normally would.

Listen to the latest afternoon headlines
from South Carolina Public Radio
for Wednesday, August 12, 2020.

 

  

After George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis in late May, waves of anguished and outraged Americans took to the streets, to livestreamed city council meetings and to social media to denounce racism.

Protesters called for police reform, defunding or outright abolition; for an end to qualified immunity for officers; for reinvestment in underfunded communities; for schools, companies and communities to address their own complicity in racial inequity.

And they called for Confederate monuments to come down.

A federal judge in New York struck down a Trump administration decision to scale back U.S. government protections for migratory birds. The change by the administration would have allowed companies that accidentally kill migratory birds during the course of their work no longer to face the possibility of criminal prosecution.

In a 31-page document, U.S. District Judge Valerie Caproni cited the novel To Kill a Mockingbird to support her decision.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Amid crackdown in China, Uighur diaspora artists promote their culture

6 hours ago

Merdan Ghappar was a fashion model for the giant Chinese online shopping website Taobao. But the video that suddenly made him famous is not a commercial — it's a rare, grim glimpse into one of the detention centers in Xinjiang, in northwest China.

Mauritius rushes to stave off oil spill

Aug 11, 2020

The island of Mauritius boasts beautiful beaches, coral reefs, lagoons and clear waters. Now, oily black sludge mars the country’s southeast coastline.

It began on Thursday when oil began leaking from the Japanese-owned MW Wakashio ship, which ran aground on a southern coral reef on July 25.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

The force from the blast that rocked Beirut on Tuesday was so strong, it hurled Pamela Zeinoun outside of the neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit where she works.

Zeinoun, a nurse at Saint George Hospital, was in charge of five babies suffering from various health issues who needed to be kept in incubators that night. 

She passed out on the floor.

“When I woke up, I did not know where I was. I tried to go back through the door, but the door was closed shut.”

Top UN education official: Pandemic causing rethink of global learning

Aug 10, 2020

Earlier this week, UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the world faces a “generational catastrophe” because of school closures amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Guterres had a stark warning about the disruption to education that could "waste untold human potential, undermine decades of progress, and exacerbate entrenched inequalities."

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SC Suffragists

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Some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts tell their stories.

Walter Edgar's Journal

Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South. All Stations: Fri at noon | News & Talk Stations: Sun at 4pm

South Carolina Lede

Each week Gavin Jackson and his guests break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

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My Telehealth: the latest on how communications tech supports long-distance health care, patient & professional health education, public health and health administration.

Health Focus

  Doctors, medical professionals and researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina are featured weekly on Health Focus.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

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