South Carolina Public Radio News

Voters cast ballots during the South Carolina Democratic presidential primary on February 29, 2020.
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 29, 2020, features: the latest on absentee voting by mail; what the Supreme Court fight could mean for the future; a look at the economic impact the pandemic is having on families; and more.

State lawmakers meet during the legislature's special session in September 2020.
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for September 22, 2020, features: a look at what South Carolina state lawmakers did during their recent special two-week session; an economic update from Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond President Tom Barkin; South Carolina's rankings in a report released by this week by the White House Coronavirus Task Force; and more.

File photo of the S.C. House chamber
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

Last Year's Operating Budget to Remain In Effect

It now appears that South Carolina’s state government will operate for the first half of its’ current fiscal year using last year’s budget.  A lack of action by the General Assembly this week left last year’s budget in place as lawmakers face continued uncertainty about the state’s economy.

USC Library Acquires Major Comic Book Collection

Sep 25, 2020
A prestigious collection of more than 180,000 historic comic books, pulp magazines and other items has been acquired by the University of South Carolina's Thomas Cooper Library.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Superman, Batman, Donald Duck, Tarzan of the Apes and many more characters that help define American popular culture have been seen in comic books and other media for many years.  The adventures of hundreds of such characters are now gathered in one place at the University of South Carolina's Thomas Cooper Library, thanks to the gift of a major collection of more than 180,000 comics, pulp magazines and related items from an Ohio collector.  

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Isn’t it interesting how differently the following two phrases sound:

  • A little house in the country.
  • Affordable rural housing.

They’re the same thing, really. But perceptions about life in the country depend almost entirely on whether someone with choices opts to buy a house there or someone without choices tries to buy in.

More SC Public Radio News

An heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune has been sentenced to nearly seven years in prison for fraud and forced labor as a leading member of Nxivm, a cult-like self-help group accused of holding women captive, and coercing them into having sex with the group's leader.

Clare Bronfman, 41, was a member of Nxvim — pronounced Nehk-see-um — for 15 years, eventually joining its executive board and bankrolling numerous lawsuits against critics of the secretive organization led by Keith Raniere.

Sarah Collins Rudolph was 12 years old when the explosion of a bomb, planted by the Ku Klux Klan, ripped through the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963.

Her sister and three other young girls were killed by the dynamite blast, and although she survived, she lost an eye and was hospitalized for months. Since then, the medical bills and the trauma of that violent Sunday have haunted her.

Brad Parscale, the former campaign manager and longtime digital strategist to President Trump, has stepped away from his role in the president's re-election effort, campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh confirms to NPR. Last weekend, Parscale was involved in an incident with police that saw him involuntarily hospitalized.

In a statement to Politico on Wednesday, Parscale said he was stepping down to seek help for "overwhelming stress" on both him and his family.

The head of the Federal Aviation Administration conducted his own test flight of a Boeing 737 Max Wednesday, and he's giving it a positive review, as the regulatory agency gets closer to allowing the troubled jet to return to commercial passenger service more than 18 months after it was grounded.

The Trump administration has added its fourth political appointee in three months to the Census Bureau amid growing concerns about partisan interference with the 2020 census.

Earl "Trey" Mayfield has been appointed to serve as counselor to the bureau's director, Steven Dillingham, the bureau's chief spokesperson, Michael Cook, confirmed in a statement Wednesday to NPR.

"In this role, Mr. Mayfield will assist the Director in strategic decision making and litigation coordination, reporting to the Department of Commerce Office of General Counsel," Cook said.

The Glass Fire has prompted the evacuation of thousands of residents in California's Napa and Sonoma counties and caused the destruction of dozens of buildings.

Since igniting in the wine country on early Sunday, wind-fueled flames have engulfed 48,440 acres and consumed more than 50 homes and buildings, according to CalFire. As of late Wednesday morning, the fire was only 2% contained.

Updated 1 a.m. ET Thursday

President Trump signed a short-term spending bill into law early Thursday, about an hour after current funding levels expired and averting a federal government shutdown.

Hours earlier the Senate voted 84-10 to approve the bill, which extends current funding levels and keeps the federal government open through Dec. 11

In theory, parts of the government were unfunded for about an hour, but the White House did not address the discrepancy in a brief statement following the signing.

Yvette Gentry will become the third police chief in the city of Louisville, Ky., since the police killing of Breonna Taylor in March.

After serving in the department for two decades — including time as a deputy police chief — Gentry retired in 2014. She will be the first Black woman to lead the department and will serve on an interim basis.

President Trump has consistently told Americans "the complete opposite" of what his health experts have been telling him in private meetings about COVID-19, according to Olivia Troye, who until recently worked on the the White House coronavirus task force.

A man has been charged with attempted murder after he fired multiple shots into a Los Angeles County sheriff's patrol vehicle earlier this month.

Deonte Lee Murray, 36, allegedly fired a handgun into the squad car as it was parked near a train station in Compton on Sept. 12. The two deputies inside were critically wounded, but were able to radio for help.

Pages

News and Features from APM and PRI

The largest international body charged with monitoring elections — the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, or OSCE — wanted to bring in 500 observers for the upcoming US elections.

Instead, there will be about 130. That’s mostly because of concerns about COVID-19; fewer people than expected volunteered to come to the US.

The European Parliament has nominated Iraqi Archbishop Najeeb Michaeel Moussa for its prestigious Sakharov Prize, awarded every year to recognize individuals and organizations that defend human rights. 

It’s hardly surprising that Laos is under China’s sway.

The former is a mountainous nation of 7 million people, mostly farmers, with an economy smaller than that of Mobile, Alabama. It sits next to a superpower soon to possess the largest economy in human history.

In the past decade or so, China, via its vast network of state-run companies, has brought a development blitz to Laos. Think highways and train lines, gold mines and rubber plantations, and hydropower dams tapping the flow of the Mekong River.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Growing numbers of Latinos in Georgia have come out to support the Black Lives Matter movement over the past few months — and increasingly, it’s shaping how they could vote in the upcoming US general election. 

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

More...

Special Coverage

Watch an archived version of the latest debate.

Programming Changes

Changes Are Coming to Our Program Schedule

Our broadcast schedules will look different as we say goodbye to a few programs, welcome new additions to our lineup, and move some old favorites to new times.

SC Suffragists

2021 ETV Endowment Internships

Now Accepting Applications for the 2021 ETV Endowment Internships at ETV and South Carolina Public Radio.

Some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts tell their stories.

My Telehealth Podcasts

My Telehealth: the latest on how communications tech supports long-distance health care, patient & professional health education, public health and health administration.

South Carolina Lede

Each week Gavin Jackson and his guests break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

Health Focus

  Doctors, medical professionals and researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina are featured weekly on Health Focus.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.