South Carolina Public Radio News

Provided by Veronica Morris

In the middle of an interview on Zoom, nature called on Hestia Morris to be let into the yard. Veronica Morris took her, trilling a sing-song hellooo to a neighbor under a perfect, cobalt Rock Hill sky.

How ordinary it all would be for anyone who isn’t Veronica Morris. But for this particular service-dog mom, stepping out into the yard without thinking anything of it is not always a guarantee. Morris is an agoraphobe whose condition is so severe, she is considered disabled.

COVID-19 Alters Halloween Traditions

4 hours ago
Visitors to Trenholm Road United Methodist Church's pumpkin patch in Columbia can look for pumpkins while staying socially distant in separate grids throughout the patch.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the traditions of many families, and Halloween in South Carolina is one of them.  Many families have decided not to Trick or Treat this year, and organizations have also changed their Halloween plans.  The annual Trunk or Treat event at Columbia's Trenholm Road United Methodist Church had to be cancelled this year, according to Anna Burrell, interim director of children and families ministry.  

Their recent political ads have changed.  Democratic Congressman Joe Cunningham features his two year-old son Boone as music plays in the background.

"We teach our kids to respect others and find common ground.  But that's not what you see in Washington," the congressman says.

Republican challenger Nancy Mace appears from a Waffle House.

"I waited tables at the Waffle House and as a single mom I know every dollar counts," says Mace.

Early Voters Turn Out In Record Numbers Statewide

Oct 27, 2020
Absentee voters wait in line outside Seacoast Church in Mount Pleasant
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

From the Upstate to the Lowcountry, absentee or early voters are making their way to the polls in droves.  The state election commission estimates more than one million absentee ballots could be cast in South Carolina.

People outside of the South Carolina Statehouse hold silhouettes during the annual Silent Witness ceremony on October 6, 2020. The silhouettes represent those who died from domestic violence in 2019.
SCETV

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for October 27, 2020, features: the voices of voters from around the state a week out from Election Day; a look at efforts to prevent domestic violence in South Carolina; the importance of getting the flu vaccine is this winter; and more.

More SC Public Radio News

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Warped Reality

For the past few years, journalist Andrew Marantz has been embedded in the world of far-right extremists online. He explains how once-fringe conspiracy theories migrated into the national discourse.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Warped Reality

Deep fakes are taking over the Internet—distorting our perception of what's real. Law professor Danielle Citron explains how deception online not only harms people, but also our democracy.

Frost Possible Next Week
SCEIN

The fall season can bring it all in the Palmetto State: just days after a tropical storm brought strong winds to the state, a cooler change is likely to bring frost to areas mainly west of I-95 by early next week.

 

A cold front quickly followed behind the departure of Tropical Storm Zeta late Thursday. Temperatures were 15 to 25 degrees colder behind the front Friday morning compared to Thursday morning. Patchy frost is possible over parts of the Upstate early Saturday morning, especially west of Interstate 85, but some wind is likely to prevent a widespread frost.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"K" is for Kershaw, Joseph (ca. 1727-1791). Merchant. A native of Yorkshire, England, Joseph Kershaw immigrated to South Carolina around the mid-1750s. After clerking for a Charleston mercantile firm, he settled near Pine Tree Hill as agent for one of the largest firms in the colony. He expanded his own business operations to include a flour and grist mill, indigo works, a warehouse, a brewery, and a distillery. Kershaw was elected to the Commons House of Assembly, the First and Second Provincial Congresses, and the first five General Assemblies.

When the tremendous benefits of George Washington Carver’s regime of rotating cotton with peanuts resulted in huge numbers of peanuts being grown, it created a dilemma. There wasn’t much demand for peanuts – we weren’t making peanut butter sandwiches or roasting peanuts or using them for candies. But Carter developed mind-boggling uses for this plant.  Paint pigments, different types of paper, sweeping compound, and charcoal were some of the items made from the shells or vines of peanuts.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"U" is for Union Leagues. Union Leagues sprang into existence across South Carolina and the South in the years immediately following the Civil War. The organization’s attraction was partly fraternal, with meetings marked by elaborate rituals, singing, and patriotic proclamations. The leagues’ primary mission, however, was the political education of the freedmen. At meetings the leading issues of the day, such as education, voting rights and land reform were discussed and candidates recommended for public office. By 1867 there were eighty-eight leagues in the state.

The Incas selected and developed peanuts from a wild ancestor 4000 years ago. The Spanish and Portuguese invaders carried the seeds to Africa, Asia and India where they quickly became part   of those peoples’ diets and a crucial ingredient in many recipes. They were reintroduced to the New World as a food for the people captured in Africa and sent to the Americas as slaves. It wasn’t until Dr. Carver began his campaign promoting peanuts that they became recognized as a healthy addition to the diet of all Americans.

Listen to the latest morning headlines
from South Carolina Public Radio
for Friday, October 30, 2020

Murphy Bannerman first noticed the posts this summer, in a Facebook group called Being Black in Arizona.

Someone started posting memes full of false claims that seemed designed to discourage people from voting.

The memes were "trying to push this narrative of, 'The system is a mess and there's no point in you participating,'" Bannerman said. She recalled statements like, "'Democrats and Republicans are the same. There's no point in voting.' 'Obama didn't do anything for you during his term, why should you vote for a Democrat this time around?'"

Provided by Veronica Morris

In the middle of an interview on Zoom, nature called on Hestia Morris to be let into the yard. Veronica Morris took her, trilling a sing-song hellooo to a neighbor under a perfect, cobalt Rock Hill sky.

How ordinary it all would be for anyone who isn’t Veronica Morris. But for this particular service-dog mom, stepping out into the yard without thinking anything of it is not always a guarantee. Morris is an agoraphobe whose condition is so severe, she is considered disabled.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

“What’s not to love about chocolate?” actor Idris Elba asks in a video that circulated on social media last month by the Dutch ethically sourced chocolate brand, Tony’s Chocolonely.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Tanzania has a history of free and fair elections, but now, as voters head to the polls to elect their next president, it's not so clear.

President John Magufuli, with the ruling Revolutionary party (CCM) is up for a second term. But the main opposition party leader, Tundu Lissu, with the Party for Democracy and Progress (Chadema), is giving him a fight. So much so that for months, the government has put restrictions on the opposition party.

In the run-up to the general election on Nov. 3, our series examines how US President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden diverge on key issues by identifying important stories that highlight what the candidates would do differently on the global stage:

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South Carolina U.S. Senate Debate

Lindsey Graham & Jaime Harrison debate

On SCETV and all South Carolina Public Radio Statlions

South Carolina Lede

Each week Gavin Jackson and his guests break down state political news and go inside the legislative happenings that could affect you, your family, and your pocketbook.

SC Suffragists

Walter Edgar's Journal

Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South. All Stations: Fri at noon | News & Talk Stations: Sun at 4pm

2021 ETV Endowment Internships

Now Accepting Applications for the 2021 ETV Endowment Internships at ETV and South Carolina Public Radio.

Some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts tell their stories.

Health Focus

  Doctors, medical professionals and researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina are featured weekly on Health Focus.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

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