Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Thousands of protesters flooded the streets of the Pakistani capital today in mass demonstrations against the government. The protests were led by fiery Islamic cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri and former cricket star turned politician Imran Khan.

Demonstrators are demanding that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif step down over alleged fraud in the country's May 2013 election, something Sharif has refused to do, according to The Associated Press.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, considered a possible GOP presidential candidate in 2016, was indicted on felony abuse-of-power charges late Friday in connection with his veto of funding for state public corruption prosecutors.

The case, which has been bubbling for months, is complicated. Here's a closer look at what we know from various sources:

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET.

A couple from upstate New York has been charged with two counts of first-degree kidnapping in connection with the abduction of two Amish girls from a roadside farm stand earlier this week.

Stephen Howells II, 39, and Nicole Vaisey, 25, appeared in a court in Albany late Friday with their lawyers, but were not allowed to enter a plea, The Associated Press reports. They were ordered held without bond.

By way of background, the AP writes:

Update at 1:25 p.m. ET.

U.S. F/A-18s and drones are conducting airstrikes around the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq, a senior U.S. official tells NPR.

The region has seen stepped up fighting in recent days between Kurdish peshmerga forces and Islamic State, or ISIS, militants.

Residents living near the Mosul Dam told The Associated Press that the area was being targeted in airstrikes.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET.

European Union foreign ministers condemned "atrocities and abuses" carried out in Iraq by Islamic insurgents against religious minorities, and gave the green light to its members to provide arms to combat the militants.

In an emergency meeting in Brussels, the EU's top diplomats did not reach a consensus agreement on the situation in Iraq, but said individual members were free to send arms to Iraq's Kurds to use in the fight against Islamic State (IS) militants in the country's north.

Police in Indonesia say that a U.S. couple being held in connection with the brutal killing of a 62-year-old Chicago woman while the three vacationed in Bali could face the death penalty if they are charged with premeditated murder.

The body of Sheila von Wiese-Mack was found stuffed in a bloodied suitcase on the resort island of Bali on Tuesday. After a preliminary investigation, Indonesian police detained the woman's 19-year-old daughter, Heather Mack, and Mack's boyfriend, Tommy Schaefer, 21.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET.

Ukraine's president says Kiev's artillery destroyed a "significant" part of a Russian armored column that is said to have crossed the border overnight.

Russia called the claim a "fantasy."

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET.

Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki announced today that he will step down and endorse his nominated successor, state television says.

Maliki, who has been under increasing pressure to step aside, will be succeeded by Haider al-Abadi, from the prime minister's own Dawa Party, who was appointed on Monday and had begun the process of forming a Cabinet despite Maliki's angry denunciations.

The wife of Robin Williams, who took his own life on Monday, says the actor/comedian was sober at the time of death, but suffering from the early stages of Parkinson's disease, a progressive and debilitating neuromuscular condition.

"Robin's sobriety was intact" at the time of his suicide, Susan Schneider said. "[He] struggled with his own battles of depression, anxiety as well as early stages of Parkinson's disease, which he was not yet ready to share publicly."

It's been a cutthroat existence for Colorado's state fish.

The rare greenback cutthroat trout, for years on the receiving end of a well-meaning, but taxonomically misguided attempt to save it, now seems to be back on track (though not out of the woods).

Update at 2:25 p.m. ET.

President Obama says U.S. airstrikes have broken a siege by Islamic militants of minority Yazidis on a mountaintop in northwestern Iraq and it's unlikely that more airdrops of humanitarian aid will be necessary.

"Our military was able to successfully strike ISIL targets around the mountain," where the militant group had laid siege to the Yazidis, he said.

He said U.S. airstrikes against the militants would continue "to protect our people and facilities in Iraq."

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET:

President Obama is calling the situation in Ferguson, Mo., where violence has broken out in the aftermath of a police shooting of an unarmed black teenager, "heartbreaking and tragic."

Speaking in Edgartown, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard where he is vacationing, Obama said he received a briefing this morning from Attorney General Eric Holder.

So far, a five-day extension to a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas appears to be holding, NPR's Jackie Northam reports from Jerusalem.

She says, "There were a few tense hours before the ... extension was announced — rockets were fired from Gaza into southern Israel, and the Israeli military responded with airstrikes. But it's been quiet since, as both sides prepare to return to Egyptian-brokered negotiations aimed at creating a long-term truce."

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has won Turkey's first-ever direct presidential election, with an unofficial 53 percent of the vote.

Opposition candidate Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu conceded defeat in elections, offering congratulations to Erdogan in a brief statement to reporters in Istanbul.

AP reports:

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