Walter Edgar

Host

Dr. Walter Edgar has two programs on South Carolina Public Radio: Walter Edgar's Journal, and South Carolina from A to Z. Dr. Edgar receivedhisA.B.degreefromDavidson College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1969. After two years in the army (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), he returned to USC as a post-doctoral fellow of the National Archives, assigned to the Papers of Henry Laurens.

In 1972 he joined the faculty of the History Department and in 1980 was named director of the Institute for Southern Studies. Dr. Edgar is the Claude Henry Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies and the George Washington Distinguished Professor of History. He retired from USC in 2012.

He has written or edited numerous books about South Carolina and the American South, including South Carolina: A History, the first new history of the state in more than 60 years. With more than 37,000 copies in print and an audio edition, it has been a publishing phenomenon. Partisans & Redcoats: The Southern Conflict that Turned the Tide of the American Revolution is in its fourth printing. He is also the editor of the South Carolina Encyclopedia.

Ways to Connect

Balcony seating originally designed for enslaved persons attending services at Trinity
Bill Fitzpatrick

For almost 30 years, Preservation South Carolina has been dedicated to preserving and protecting the historic and irreplaceable architectural heritage of South Carolina. Executive Director Michael Bedenbaugh and board member join Walter Edgar to talk about some of their projects, including efforts to preserve Endangered Sacred Spaces, which includes the restoration of Abbeville’s Trinity Episcopal Church.

- Originally broadcast 10/18/19 - 

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"N" is for New Ellenton [Aiken County; population 2,250]. Initially called North Ellenton prior to its incorporation, New Ellenton was an offspring of the Cold War and considered by many locals to have been "the first victim of the H-bomb." Incorporated in 1952, the town was the reincarnation of the town of Ellenton—a depot on the Port Royal Railroad.

In his new novel, The Last At-Bat of Shoeless Joe (2019, Chickadee Prince), Granville Wyche Burgess  imagines Shoeless Joe Jackson, the outfielder disgraced in the 1919 “Black Sox” scandal, living in Greenville, South Carolina, and finding that sports history has one more twist in store for him.

Southern Women

Mar 23, 2020
Walter Edgar's Journal
SC Public Radio

The Southern woman has long been synonymous with the Southern belle, a “moonlight and magnolias” myth that gets nowhere close to describing the strong, richly diverse women who have thrived because of—and in some cases, despite—the South.

"P" is for Pacolet

Mar 20, 2020
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Pacolet (Spartanburg County; 2010 population 2,690). Some people believe that “Pacolet” is a Cherokee word meaning “fast-running horse,” while others hold that it comes from the last name of an early French settler. In the 1880s, textile manufacturing pioneer John H. Montgomery purchased 350 acres and opened a three-story, 10,000 spindle mill in full operation. By 1895 there were three mills with a capacity of 53,424 spindles and 1,864 looms—making it the largest textile manufacturing complex in Spartanburg County.

"O" is for Oconee bell

Mar 19, 2020
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"O" is for Oconee bell. The Oconee bell (Shortia galacifolia) is a small, evergreen species related to Galax, with white flowers produced in March. It was discovered by French botanist André Michaux in 1787 in the mountains of South Carolina along the Keowee River near the present Jocassee Dam. For decades botanists unsuccessfully tried to find the plant in the wild, but it remained “lost” until the late nineteenth century when it was discovered in McDowell County, North Carolina. The plant immediately gained fame and has maintained its popularity ever since.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"N" is for Nance, Milligan Maceo, Jr. (1925-2001). University president. After service in World War II, Nance returned to college at South Carolina State. Nance graduated in 1949 was employed by his alma mater as a clerk. Over the next two decades he steadily advanced through the administrative ranks. In 1968, during campus unrest that led to the Orangeburg Massacre, Nance was a steadying influence on campus and in the Orangeburg community. In June 1968, he was named president. During his nineteen-year tenure, the college experienced dramatic growth and progress.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for MacDowell, Rosalie Anderson (b. 1958). Actress, model. A Gaffney native, “Andie” MacDowell attended Winthrop College for two years, but then moved to New York. Although she had only minimal modeling experience, she boldly walked into New York’s Elite Model Management and was hired. She became a successful model in New York and Paris. While continuing to represent L’Oreal cosmetics, MacDowell pursued her dream of becoming a film actress. Her first film role was as Lady Jane in Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan of the Apes (1984).

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"L" is for Lafaye and Lafaye. Founded by George Eugene Lafaye, the firm of Lafaye and Lafaye was one of the state’s most respected and successful architectural practices from the 1910s until the 1970s. Lafaye moved to Columbia in 1900 as chief draftsman for W.B. Smith Whaley & Company. In 1907 Lafaye established his own company and in 1913 hired his younger brother Robert. After World War I, the firm became Lafaye and Lafaye. Over the next twenty years it designed a number of important structures: Township Auditorium, James L. Tapp Department Store, St.

Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter
NY Public Library

Andrew Waters, author of The Quaker and the Gamecock: Nathanael Greene, Thomas Sumter, and the Revolutionary War for the Soul of the South (2018, Casemate), joins Walter Edgar to tells the story of two wildly divergent leaders against the backdrop of the American Revolution's last gasp, the effort to extricate a British occupation force from the wild and lawless South Carolina frontier.

"J" is for Jackson, Jesse Louis (b. 1941). Minister, civil and human rights activist. A Greenville native, Jackson was a star quarterback and student leader at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro. In Greensboro he led a successful demonstration to end discrimination in downtown stores. In 1967 Dr. Martin Luther King put Jackson in charge of Operation Breadbasket in Chicago. Jackson successfully organized black Chicagoans to boycott companies and stores that had “heavy minority patronage” to secure better service and more jobs.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"K" is for Kensington Plantation (Richland County). In the early 1850s, Greek revival remained the favorite architectural style of the state’s planter elite. However, Matthew Richard Singleton opted to transform his upcountry farmhouse into an elegant Renaissance-inspired residence that recalled country villas of northern Italy. Singleton hired Charleston architect Edward C. Jones to head the project. Kensington is a frame house on a raised basement. The domed structure is flanked by two gabled wings with arched colonnades and fronted by a porte cochere.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"J" is for Jackson, Jesse Louis (b. 1941). Minister, civil and human rights activist. A Greenville native, Jackson was a star quarterback and student leader at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro. In Greensboro he led a successful demonstration to end discrimination in downtown stores. In 1967 Dr. Martin Luther King put Jackson in charge of Operation Breadbasket in Chicago. Jackson successfully organized black Chicagoans to boycott companies and stores that had “heavy minority patronage” to secure better service and more jobs.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"I" is for Indian Mounds. Dotting South Carolina’s streams and rivers are vestiges of her prehistoric past. These mounds offer fragmentary evidence of the cultures that thrived before the Europeans arrived. At least sixteen Woodland mounds and nineteen Mississippian mounds have been identified that are at least fifty percent intact. Another eleven known sites have been destroyed or are underwater. Woodland period mounds are located primarily along coastal rivers while Mississippian mounds are found on inland rivers near the fall line.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"H" is for Hagler (d. 1763). Catawba chief. King Hagler is the best known of the Catawba chieftains. He rose to power in the 1750s. In 1751 he was a member of a peace delegation assembled by Governor James Glen to negotiate peace with the tribe’s long-time enemies, the Iroquois of New York. Under King Hagler, the Catawbas supported the British during the French and Indian War by sending soldiers to Virginia to fight with Colonel George Washington.

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