All Things Considered

Mon-Fri, 4:00-6:30 pm
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish

Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Program Web Site

Ways to Connect

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

How Much Would Coronavirus Vaccine Cost?

1 hour ago

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

June 2020 was a pride month that looked different from past years, and not just because people were socially distancing and wearing masks: Demonstrations for LGBTQ equality overlapped with protests against violence and systemic racism against Black people.

At the intersection of these two fights for equality are Black transgender people.

Imara Jones, an independent journalist and founder of TransLash media, told NPR's All Things Considered, that this moment has been "a crucible."

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pride month is over, and it looked a little different this year, not just because people were social distancing and wearing masks. Demonstrations for LGBTQ equality overlapped with protests against violence and systemic racism against Black people. At the intersection of these two fights for equality are Black transgender people. A couple weeks ago, organizers estimate that 15,000 people gathered in Brooklyn to march for Black trans lives. It's believed to have been the biggest-ever gathering of its kind.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

To Arizona now, where the state is reporting some of the worst coronavirus numbers in the country. Hospitals are filling up. The Republican governor, Doug Ducey, is asking for help. NPR's Will Stone has the latest.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The surge in COVID-19 infections throughout Alabama is forcing Gov. Kay Ivey to rethink plans to reopen the state.

For the last seven days, Alabama has logged an average of nearly 1,000 new daily coronavirus cases, with hospitalizations at their highest level since the pandemic began.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

COVID-19 infections are now on the rise in 40 states, and that is forcing many governors to rethink their reopening plans. In Alabama yesterday, Gov. Kay Ivey extended her state's safer-at-home orders until the end of July.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KAY IVEY: While we are not overwhelmed yet, we should not think that because our summer feels more normal than our spring that we are back to normal. Fact is, folks, we are still in the thick of this virus disease, and it is deadly.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

COVID-19 infections are now on the rise in 40 states, and that is forcing many governors to rethink their reopening plans. In Alabama yesterday, Gov. Kay Ivey extended her state's safer-at-home orders until the end of July.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KAY IVEY: While we are not overwhelmed yet, we should not think that because our summer feels more normal than our spring that we are back to normal. Fact is, folks, we are still in the thick of this virus disease, and it is deadly.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Tourism has been decimated by coronavirus closures. And that's been especially tough in areas that rely heavily on seasonal dollars, like the Berkshires in western Massachusetts. Andrea Shea of member station WBUR reports on the region's creative economy now shut down by the pandemic.

ANDREA SHEA, BYLINE: During a normal summer, 350,000 visitors set up blankets and coolers on the lawn at the Tanglewood Music Festival in Lenox to hear music in the open air.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Pages